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Does streaming mean the death of movie theaters?


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At the moment, the biggest threat that pandemic-era "Premieres" pose to theaters is that they've almost blurred the line between Real Movies and "Fake" made-for-streaming movies out of existence:
I know that if Wonder Woman 1984, or Luca, or the live-action Mulan premieres on HBOMax or Disney+, it's a big blockbuster that had to also open in whatever theaters were open as a contractual studio obligation that went back to pre-pandemic '19...But when I see an ad for "Cry Macho"?  "Free Guy"?  The hysterically promoted "Blue Bayou", which is not so much "Oscar-bait" as "Oscar dynamite-fishing"?  Were these movies that were ACTUALLY going to play wide big-studio theatrical release if there was no lockdown??  Or just fake ones, like the overpromoted  indies that get six promotional tweets an hour on social media, or the Amazon Woke-Drama of the Week?

I'd like to experiment with going back to a theater (carefully), now that ours is open again, but the reasons for even going to a theater anymore seem to have flipped upside down--Even before the pandemic, I was asking whether some studios (ahem warner) literally even knew how to make single middle-tier movies anymore without the need for franchise-universe blockbusters to keep the house brand name going, and now I'm convinced that instinct has atrophied completely.  

We're going to be in a Dark Ages for moviemaking if and when this is all over, if somebody doesn't stop defending their streaming income and starts standing up for the theater-release industry.

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Martin Scorsese Says Cinema is Being Systematically Devalued by Streaming Services

I believe there's no one in this forum who doesn't understand the unique value of the shared cinema experience. What's a comedy without hearing the roar of laughter from a theater full of people? It's still funny, but watching it on your laptop in your bedroom is not the same experience, not even close. The same goes for emotionally powerful films as well. I believe humans need to share sorrow.  A theater full of people sees the story unfold, and if it's done correctly and there's truth behind the emotion, you will find yourself in a room full of people who are no longer complete strangers. Who says movies are just movies? It ain't necessarily so.

I hate to say it, because I love movies, and I have loved seeing films on the big screen with other people who may have nothing at all in common with me except a desire to be told a story, but I''ve stopped going to the cinema for the most part, and this was true long before the COVID hysteria seized upon the world. The first time I saw a TV commercial at a movie theater, my jaw dropped. And then there's the sensory assault of having these misplaced commercials blasted at the audience at ear-splitting decibel levels. For heaven's sake, why? Movies no longer start on time. The theater chains fudge the start times so you will be in your seat for the tsunami of sound. You're gonna pay attention to these ads and you're gonna like it- or perhaps, next week, we'll make them even louder. The last two times I visted a movie theater, I brought ear plugs. Most useful. Also, I stopped being my punctual self. About twenty minutes late seems to be just about right.

The concession stand. They might as well put a stack of credit applications on the counter. Yes, I know, the theater supposedly makes its money at the concession. I can believe that. Imagine a family of six attending a film. What's the pricetag on that if you have kids who want the full experience, including a soft drink for $5.75 and that 8 dollar tub of popcorn?

Last but certainly not least, I find little to nothing I want to see out of what's currenty being puked out by the PC ninnies in Hollywood. Mountains of CGI garbage with three edits per second, and hidden lectures about how evil is America, men, etc.  It used to be that acting was not an honorable profession, but...no. wait...once again, it's not honorable. Lectured to about real life by the likes of Gwyneth Paltrow? Yeah, not a chance.

I believe there will be theaters to attend twenty years from now, but the classic period of cinema, yeah, that's gone.

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22 hours ago, unwatchable said:

The first time I saw a TV commercial at a movie theater, my jaw dropped.

The first time I saw one, it was a "fake" trailer about butlers planning a robbery, which turned out to be a sports car ad, and there was a disappointed groan from the audience--Aww, we wanted to SEE that!   😯

Although this was back in the early 80's, when that Activision game-cartridge ad got more sounds of puzzlement than groans:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qreQBaDsOVY   🧐

Quote

I believe there will be theaters to attend twenty years from now, but the classic period of cinema, yeah, that's gone.

The Gamestop-like fatal diagnosis of AMC Cineplex should be a wakeup call for cities to rediscover antique downtown 1-3 screen micro-theaters again, since those were the theaters running "Save Our Theater" campaigns with special virtual screenings, early on in the Lockdown.  Before the majority of those theaters were the arthouse screens ramming gay/feminist/Spectrum indie documentaries down our throats with the aforementioned social-media carpet-bombing, and blackened the good name of hardworking commercial independent theaters.

And even worse, we've got to contend with a generation that literally--LITERALLY--thinks that "Shopping mall cineplex" = "Movie theater", because they've never known anything else, and are struggling to save AMC before "Movie theaters disappear completely!", unquote.   Um, some of us didn't have as sheltered childhoods.    🙄

 

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I've heard all these arguments before.  

I do fear the possibility of less to no movie theaters.  For one, I never could, nor do I care to know ANY idiot that would watch a first run movie on a phone, tablet or laptop.   Maybe streaming to a good sized "smart" TV monitor might be a bit more acceptable.  But to think there may be generations that totally miss out on the big silver screen movie going experience saddens me a bit.    It also might mean the end of cute exchanges like----

When a grandnephew of ours was about four years old, he was going on about some movie he saw.  His description didn't sound like any of the movies my sister in law would let him watch from her collection of children's movies, so she asked him, "When did you see that movie?"    And his answer?

"When Mommy and Daddy took me to the BIG TV!"  :D 

Never before or since heard a movie theater described that way.  ;) 

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It's been predicted many times before, and yet it survives. There is no substitute for "the movie experience". Love it of hate it, it stands alone, and "dinner and a movie" is still SOP for many on dates. It will eventually be a thing of the past, but it'll be a slow death, and, for now, is doing well enough.

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Shang-Chi and the Legend of the 10 Rings just made $94 million on its opening weekend in theaters only? Whichis no doubt poor for a Marvel movie but fantastic for COVID times. Seems like there's a chance movie theaters will survive. I'm rooting for it.

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Radio was supposed to be the end of live musical performances.

Radio was supposed to be the end of newspapers.

Movies were supposed to be the end of live theater.

Television was supposed to be the end of movie theaters.

Video games were supposed to be the end of civilization.

Computers were supposed to be the end of paper being used in offices.

The Internet was supposed to be the end of newspapers, radio and television.

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1 hour ago, SansFin said:

Radio was supposed to be the end of live musical performances.

Radio was supposed to be the end of newspapers.

Movies were supposed to be the end of live theater.

Television was supposed to be the end of movie theaters.

Video games were supposed to be the end of civilization.

Computers were supposed to be the end of paper being used in offices.

The Internet was supposed to be the end of newspapers, radio and television.

https://moviecollectoroh.com/pics_to_hotlink_on_TCM/forum-continue.jpg

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19 minutes ago, 37kitties said:

Xerox machines were supposed to be the end of carbon paper.

And they were, pretty much.

Word processors ended typewriters. Though I think you can still get an Olivetti. 

There is something about the theater experience, live entertainment especially. We rarely go to cinema but I am hoping to see both Free Guy (wife came into a coupon for Cinemark) and The Lost Leonardo, which I will have to pay for. If I'm still willing to go every couple of years, then theaters will probably be around a while longer.

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On 9/8/2021 at 11:19 AM, unwatchable said:

. . . I believe there's no one in this forum who doesn't understand the unique value of the shared cinema experience. What's a comedy without hearing the roar of laughter from a theater full of people? It's still funny, but watching it on your laptop in your bedroom is not the same experience, not even close. The same goes for emotionally powerful films as well. I believe humans need to share sorrow.  A theater full of people sees the story unfold, and if it's done correctly and there's truth behind the emotion, you will find yourself in a room full of people who are no longer complete strangers. Who says movies are just movies? It ain't necessarily so . . .

Please allow me to introduce myself.

Your belief is wrong, in my case. I totally disagree with your perspective. I, for one, think that the "communal experience" of movies is extremely overrated . . . by "people who need people" (Not guilty!).

Whenever I go to a movie, I go to a matinee that is usually sparsely attended. I loathe and detest crowds -- particularly now, during this pandemic.

As I expressed elsewhere in another discussion on the TCM Message Boards, I don't need an audience to make a comedy funny (or funnier), a horror film scary (or scarier), a tear-jerker touching (or more touching), or a powerful drama more powerful. I don't need to be prompted by an audience to respond/react to a movie.

The first time that I watched Reservoir Dogs was on my TV and I was captivated -- riveted -- by Quentin Tarantino's earworm dialogue. The only dubious benefit of watching it at a movie theatre would have been to see the cast "larger than life" on The Big Screen.

Yes, some movies should be seen in a movie theatre. For me, the first movie -- this year during the pandemic -- that compelled me to see it in a movie theatre (COVID-19 be damned!) was Godzilla vs. Kong. Watching it on a movie theatre screen definitely enhanced my experience. But, unless a movie is an extravaganza -- a "spectacle" -- or an epic (e.g., Ben-Hur) -- I have absolutely zero problem watching it on the telly.

"What's a comedy without hearing the roar of laughter from a theater full of people?"

Funny.

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7 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Your belief is wrong, in my case. I totally disagree with your perspective. I, for one, think that the "communal experience" of movies is extremely overrated . . .

Devastating. How shall I make it through today, knowing someone on the internet disagrees with me?

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You should talk.  Stating one's opinion is fine and expected, but:

1 hour ago, unwatchable said:

Your belief is wrong, in my case. I totally disagree with your perspective.

Could you be any more obvious? Nice try, but a sarcastic response is all you deserve with that approach. I love the "Your belief is wrong" (comma) "in my case."     "I totally disagree"

Jesus, man. You sound like a teenager. What a joke. Whatever happened to simply stating your opinion without this kind of stuff? It's obvious what you're trying to do.

I care not about what you think about my opinions. As I stated in another thread "to each his own" doesn't seem to apply around here. I'm upsetting the clique.

Don't worry, though. I'll be sure to remember that my belief (IOW, my opinion) is wrong. Oh, in your case, of course. Tacking that on makes all the difference. 😛

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47 minutes ago, unwatchable said:

You should talk.  Stating one's opinion is fine and expected, but:

Could you be any more obvious? Nice try, but a sarcastic response is all you deserve with that approach. I love the "Your belief is wrong" (comma) "in my case."     "I totally disagree"

Jesus, man. You sound like a teenager. What a joke. Whatever happened to simply stating your opinion without this kind of stuff? It's obvious what you're trying to do.

I care not about what you think about my opinions. As I stated in another thread "to each his own" doesn't seem to apply around here. I'm upsetting the clique.

Don't worry, though. I'll be sure to remember that my belief (IOW, my opinion) is wrong. Oh, in your case, of course. Tacking that on makes all the difference. 😛

Sadly the way the re-quote feature works your post made it look like you said "Your belief is wrong, in my case. ". 

Anyhow,   I'm going to start using this on the unsuspected to see if it gets by undetected.       That is one bogus statement for the ages.

 

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Your belief is wrong, in my case.

The above text was copied directly from his post, then bolded and enlarged for clarity. This is exactly what he posted.  Try it yourself and see. It has nothing to do with a re-quote.

"Your belief is wrong" (comma) "in my case."    Different emphasis to highlight the comma. Again, copied directly from my post, no quote, half-quote, re-quote or de-quote.

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2 hours ago, unwatchable said:

Your belief is wrong, in my case.

The above text was copied directly from his post, then bolded and enlarged for clarity. This is exactly what he posted.  Try it yourself and see. It has nothing to do with a re-quote.

"Your belief is wrong" (comma) "in my case."    Different emphasis to highlight the comma. Again, copied directly from my post, no quote, half-quote, re-quote or de-quote.

What I see is this:

5 hours ago, unwatchable said:

Your belief is wrong, in my case. I totally disagree with your perspective.

***
It says "unwatchable said" and of course  that wasn't the case.    Don't you see that?    

That was the point I was making: There is a bug in the TCM "quote" feature.

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18 hours ago, David Proulx said:

. . . There is no substitute for "the movie experience". Love it of hate it, it stands alone, and "dinner and a movie" is still SOP for many on dates.

Actually, according to some relationship "experts," going to the movies is a No-No for a first date.

     "DO NOT: Go to the cinema!

     Cinema dates are great for the third, fourth or fifth date in, but if this your very first time meeting this person, the last thing you want to do is be sitting in a dark room
     with a couple of hundred other people, not talking to each other, not even looking at each other for two hours. This is the getting-to-know-you part, and you’re not going
     to get to do that in a cinema . . . " -- 5 Dos And Don'ts On A First Date

Watching a movie is an experience that actually does not require a partner or group participation. One can do it all by oneself.

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When I was...ahem...between marriages I went to see THE CRYING GAME by myself. I sat near the front, on the aisle. I didn't know what it was about but it was getting a lot of attention.

When the.....pivotal.... scene occurred I felt every eye in the theater looking at the back of my head.

You can't get that experience anywhere else but in a movie theater.

I hope they don't disappear.....but alas....I think in 10 years they will be a novelty, if they exist at all.

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18 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Actually, according to some relationship "experts," going to the movies is a No-No for a first date.

     "DO NOT: Go to the cinema!

     Cinema dates are great for the third, fourth or fifth date in, but if this your very first time meeting this person, the last thing you want to do is be sitting in a dark room
     with a couple of hundred other people, not talking to each other, not even looking at each other for two hours. This is the getting-to-know-you part, and you’re not going
     to get to do that in a cinema . . . " -- 5 Dos And Don'ts On A First Date

Watching a movie is an experience that actually does not require a partner or group participation. One can do it all by oneself.

Well, the first "real" date my second wife and I had shortly after we met was dinner and a movie.  In our case, as we both worked at the same plant and in different parts of the same division, we went through the "getting to know you" part while at work.

After the movie we went to a local Western bar she liked back in her "Urban Cowgirl" phase, had a few drinks and dances, and found a motel down the road a spell.  ;)  So much for the "experts".  B)  So I guess that advice is good depending on what the relationship was of the two before a first date is agreed on.

Sepiatone

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On 9/8/2021 at 12:45 PM, JakeHolman said:

Image result for Fox Business Logo. Size: 201 x 100. Source: commons.wikimedia.org

Jul. 09, 2021 - 8:12 - Slated co-founder Stephan Paternot and Porter Bibb of Mediatech Capital Partners discuss on 'The Claman Countdown'

https://video.foxbusiness.com/v/6263083741001#sp=show-clips

https://popculture.com/streaming/news/hbo-max-10-tcm-movies-you-need-to-watch/#1

Well they said that about television once upon a time.

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