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"The Good, The Bad and The Ugly" (1967)


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I was watching the extended cut of Sergio Leones western epic and started thinking maybe less is more.  I wish I had seen this on the big screen because Leone is a master of  using the wide frame. And yes it's a great film with some classic scenes and spectacular action. But I would have done with less of Eli Wallach's Tuco.   Eastwood is iconic but the actor that really impressed me was Lee Van Cleef that does more by just staring at the screen than Wallach endless hammy jabbering. 

 

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Well, Wallach -- the runt, least imposing, and least intimidating of the trio -- had to do something to stand out. For my money, he steals the movie from his rugged, iconic co-stars. He, arguably, has the best line in Leone's epic:

"When you have to shoot, shoot. Don't talk."

I agree about Lee Van Cleef. He didn't need dialogue to make an impression, stand out, or call attention to himself.  His steely eyes and accipitrine features were his claim to fame and fortune. But, when he needed to act, he delivered. For me, Van Cleef's best acting was in El Condor. He invested his character (the wily Jaroo) with humor, sensitivity, craftiness, and murderous villainy -- a laudable, multi-dimensional performance.

As for Eastwood: Meh! I was never a fan and never got his popularity.

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4 hours ago, LiamCasey said:

Go ahead! Make me break out a dictionary! 😀

accipitrine
[ ak-sip-i-trin, -trahyn ]
adjective
1. of, relating to, or belonging to the family Accipitridae, comprising the hawks, Old World vultures, kites, harriers, and eagles.
2. raptorial; like or related to the birds of prey.

See also: Van Cleefis Leeus

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On 9/8/2021 at 6:21 PM, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Well, Wallach -- the runt, least imposing, and least intimidating of the trio -- had to do something to stand out. For my money, he steals the movie from his rugged, iconic co-stars. He, arguably, has the best line in Leone's epic:

"When you have to shoot, shoot. Don't talk."

I agree about Lee Van Cleef. He didn't need dialogue to make an impression, stand out, or call attention to himself.  His steely eyes and accipitrine features were his claim to fame and fortune. But, when he needed to act, he delivered. For me, Van Cleef's best acting was in El Condor. He invested his character (the wily Jaroo) with humor, sensitivity, craftiness, and murderous villainy -- a laudable, multi-dimensional performance.

As for Eastwood: Meh! I was never a fan and never got his popularity.

Wallach was he big star name at the time and of course he is better actor. 

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It's been awhile since I've seen EL CONDOR but I remember becoming a fan of Lee Van Cleef when I watched BARQUERO (1970). In BARQUERO we get a vulnerable romantic side of him in his scenes with Mariette Hartley. Warren Oates is the villain so Van Cleef is able to be more likable. 

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