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What are some interesting, odd, or fun pieces of Hollywood memorabilia you have?


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Heck I steal the IMAGES off ebay rather than buying them. There's still a photo processing place here. I have a nifty 8x10 print collection in 4x6 album books. My few real autographed photos are framed.

Although I treasure my 5x7 Robert Mitchum and 4x6 Robin Williams autographed portrait photos.

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9 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Haha, it's part of my job to make exact replicas of antique paintings. F is for FAKE.

And I have attended some higher end auctions (like Southeby's in NY) that had taken reproductions on consignment. When alerted them to the fact, they just announced "age/provenance unconfirmed" when it went to bid and sold it anyway.

Wow, I would LOVE to work with antiques/ in an auction house, I'd just have no idea where to start lol

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2 hours ago, Fausterlitz said:

The photo itself sounds very cool, although (unless Keaton spelled it with a "y") the original recipient may have been someone else--Sydney Chaplin's nickname was "Syd":

th-50.jpg.bd04a5c7c4bda8f1a874cc41652ff025.jpg

http://www.sydchaplin.com/

Although on second thought, it's entirely possible that Keaton could have simply misspelled it with an "i", especially if he'd only heard the name and never seen it written down before.

I know, Charlie's son (of musical comedy fame) was also called Sydney, but the friend who gave it to me thinks it was to Charlie's brother.  I guess I'll never know for sure.

s-l300.jpg

Sydney Chaplin also starred in Bells Are Ringing and Subways Are for Sleeping.  (He was in three June Styne musicals).

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9 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

 And I have attended some higher end auctions (like Sotheby's in NY) that had taken reproductions on consignment. When alerted them to the fact, they just announced "age/provenance unconfirmed" when it went to bid and sold it anyway.

That's bad. Those guys are shady. It would be one thing if they truly didn't know, but knowing and claiming not to ... 

 

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3 hours ago, Swithin said:

I know, Charlie's son (of musical comedy fame) was also called Sydney, but the friend who gave it to me thinks it was to Charlie's brother.

Yes, the lobby card I posted is for one of the elder Sydney's films (Charlie's brother).  The younger Sydney, who appeared in Limelight (1952), would have been 10 years old in 1936; I wasn't suggesting him as the possible recipient, although I suppose that's also possible.  🙂

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39 minutes ago, Fausterlitz said:

Yes, the lobby card I posted is for one of the elder Sydney's films (Charlie's brother).  The younger Sydney, who appeared in Limelight (1952), would have been 10 years old in 1936; I wasn't suggesting him as the possible recipient, although I suppose that's also possible.  🙂

I was wondering about little Syd for the gift. The photo is actually something that a young boy might like -- Keaton in a Spanish costume holding a bird in a cage. But I doubt that it was for the kid. Btw, I've never seen the film --The Invader -- but the user reviews on IMDB are simply awful! The back of the photo frame has a sticker that says "Photo by Lewis Protheroe."

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I have the  movie album from Yankee Doodle Dandy.  A large framed picture of Marilyn Monroe and a framed picture of James Cagney, not to mention numerous movie books about the Warner Brothers Studio Story, Paramount Studio Story, MGM Studio Story and 20th Century Fox Studio Story.

When is the November schedule coming out?

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13 hours ago, LuckyDan said:

That's bad. Those guys are shady. It would be one thing if they truly didn't know, but knowing and claiming not to ... 

Although I'm an "expert" in the field the questionable object fell within, I did not work for the company. They didn't know me from Adam. So pull the item from their auction on the basis of heresay from someone in the audience?

I'm sure they consulted with the object owner who told them some lie. It didn't sell for the crazy price of a true antique, but for the lower price of a reproduction. Obviously everyone bidding smelled a rat.

I've seen fakes passed off as authentic on Antiques Roadshow too. Not everyone can be an "expert" on everything.

14 hours ago, SweetSue said:

Wow, I would LOVE to work with antiques/ in an auction house, I'd just have no idea where to start lol

That's where to start-be an expert on something, even if it's general like 20th Century Commercial/Retail items. The bigger auction houses have consultants on hand, like the Comic Book guy, the US Military guy, the Hollywood guy, Religious art guy, etc. 

When an unusual item comes in, they call you to access value, rarity, etc. But you better know your stuff, no one is an expert on everything and many can be fooled. It helps to have a long line of credentials, your provenance/experience. It also helps not referring to yourself as an expert but "knowledgeable 25 years experience in XXX field".

Hollywood and autographs especially seem pretty tricky. That's why my framed autographs say "To Sue" and are from those I actually met. No fakes. (I was given the Janet Gaynor which came with a COA & Disney World's label/price $95-don't want it)

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5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Although I'm an "expert" in the field the questionable object fell within, I did not work for the company. They didn't know me from Adam. So pull the item from their auction on the basis of heresay from someone in the audience?

I'm sure they consulted with the object owner who told them some lie. It didn't sell for the crazy price of a true antique, but for the lower price of a reproduction. Obviously everyone bidding smelled a rat.

I've seen fakes passed off as authentic on Antiques Roadshow too. Not everyone can be an "expert" on everything.

That's where to start-be an expert on something, even if it's general like 20th Century Commercial/Retail items. The bigger auction houses have consultants on hand, like the Comic Book guy, the US Military guy, the Hollywood guy, Religious art guy, etc. 

When an unusual item comes in, they call you to access value, rarity, etc. But you better know your stuff, no one is an expert on everything and many can be fooled. It helps to have a long line of credentials, your provenance/experience. It also helps not referring to yourself as an expert but "knowledgeable 25 years experience in XXX field".

Hollywood and autographs especially seem pretty tricky. That's why my framed autographs say "To Sue" and are from those I actually met. No fakes. (I was given the Janet Gaynor which came with a COA & Disney World's label/price $95-don't want it)

I had friends who had an object appraised on Antiques Roadshow.  The appraiser on the show was unsure if the item was original or not, and suggested they get the opinion of the premier authority in the country on it, who happened to be in LA.  They did so.  The LA expert couldn't definitively characterize it either.

Your Janet Gaynor autograph more than likely came from a shop called Sid Cahuenga's One-of-a-Kind at Disney-MGM Studios Theme Park.  It was just to the left after you entered the park.  Never bought anything there (I don't collect stuff) but spent some time leafing through their items.

https://d23.com/a-to-z/sid-cahuengas-one-of-a-kind/

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Heh, I recently was searching my Tiki glasses for a particular brush and realized this pair of drink glasses are cross collection pieces being both Tiki & Hollywood. They were crafted for a failed 1960 TV show set in Hawaii:

242947128_10159571072399489_724427050877

242854372_10159571072394489_224650825420

I had forgotten about gifts items given to cast & crew on productions- mugs, glasses, t-shirts and sometimes crazy bomber jackets. (you often see these for sale on ebay) One of my favorite production momento gifts is a FLY AWAY HOME '96 coffee mug. Love the movie, love the graphic.

I had a hilarious purple rhino Smoochy plush that came in a body bag, a gift to DEATH TO SMOOCHY crew. Although I loved it, my niece loves Rhinos so I gifted it to her. I'm sure (hoping) she has kept it for the unusual collectible that it is.

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I collect Classic Hollywood autographs and especially tragic figures. I currently have the signatures of:

Clara Bow (Bell), William Haines, Buster Keaton, Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd, Marion Davies, Karl Dane, James Murray (The Crowd), Lillian Gish, Mary Pickford, Warren William, John Gilbert (my favorite), Catherine Deneuve, Chester Morris, Gloria Swanson, probably some more I can’t think of right now.

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21 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

My Mom has a letter from Star Trek (the original one).

Which letter? The "S"?

Wow Vidor, those are all really old star autographs! I once had a scrapbook of someone who had made a model replica of Hollywood (or Pickfair Dollhouse or something or other) that traveled on display. It included a guest book of people who viewed it including all those stars you mentioned plus many, many more. Some included personal comments on the piece. I was supposed to post it on ebay for a client but they could not prove ownership so I declined. It was amazing, but could have been stolen.

 

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20 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

it is a letter in a response she wrote to Gene R

Gee I hope it's not like this:

gene-shattner-wig-letter.jpg

My guess it was in response to the big write in campaign to save Star Trek for another season? Thanks to your Mom for doing so! (I was too young, but my brother wrote in) 

 

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Gee I hope it's not like this:

gene-shattner-wig-letter.jpg

My guess it was in response to the big write in campaign to save Star Trek for another season? Thanks to your Mom for doing so! (I was too young, but my brother wrote in) 

 

Though I don't collect ephemera, I love looking at it, because you can get a lot of insight on day-to-day happenings from it.

This would have been written after the second season filming wrapped and before NBC OK'ed a third season.  Gulf+Western (Paramount's parent) had already bought Desilu by the time this was written, but I guess they were still using the old letterheads and other office materials.

This answers that great question as to what associate producers do! 

Never paid attention to Shatner's hairline on the show, but I did notice when the 1979 film came out, and in his later TV shows, he had a lot more hair than he did in the 1960s.  I guess hairpiece technology had advanced just like everything else.

Majel and Gene weren't married at the time this was written but were in a relationship.   And according to Nichelle Nichols, she was also in a relationship with Gene in the show's early days.

I looked up Bob Justman on Wikipedia.  According to his article, he was an associate producer the first two seasons, and was promoted to co-producer for the third, but he left the show after Paramount bought Desilu due to exhaustion and being unhappy with the way Paramount was treating the show (reducing the budget, etc.).   He must have had a good relationship with Roddenberry because he also worked on TNG.

 

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17 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

I once saw that someone was selling the plaster impression of Groucho's bridge on ebay's memorabilia section.

Gross. I am fascinated by the life face casts of several great actors/actresses available by an ebay vendor. That's how the set designers of Svengoolie built the devil head wall mounts - one is built upon Vincent Price's face, the other Boris Karloff's.

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OH MY! On another thread a poster mentioned Mel Tormé's autobiography  It Wasn't All Velvet -I promptly went to ABEBooks to buy it. I found a copy being sold by a charity Thrift Store, so bought it. I don't care so much about condition, just want to read it & like contributing to charity with my purchase. 

It arrived yesterday. It's signed "To Donna, Love Mel Tormé" and compared to my "To Susan, Best Always, Mel Tormé" received in person ca 1985. While not identical, appears authentic. The Thrift Store had 2 copies listed at $3.95 each, there was no mention either were signed copies, so I just lucked out.

This is the second time I purchased a book from a Thrift Store on ABEBooks & it came inscribed by the star - the other is Didn't You Used To Be George Murphy?

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A friend of mine is an avid collector of books on films and filmmakers. One day when he was browsing through a book store he came across a copy of a fairly rare book, Basil Rathbone's autobiography, In and Out Of Character. In glancing through the book, though, he was shocked and delighted to see that it had been signed by Rathbone on the title page. The store owner had no idea of the rarity of the item and sold it to my friend at a cheap price. My friend regards this book as one of his great finds in book browsing.

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On 9/27/2021 at 6:09 AM, TikiSoo said:

Gross. I am fascinated by the life face casts of several great actors/actresses available by an ebay vendor. That's how the set designers of Svengoolie built the devil head wall mounts - one is built upon Vincent Price's face, the other Boris Karloff's.

In the late 1980s, a guy bought about 200 face casts at an auction. They'd been made by someone who created masks/make-up/prosthetics for movies. I don't remember exactly, but I'm fairly sure one of them was Vincent Price.  (I got involved because the buyer wanted to scan them into a computer. The companies who could do it wanted too much money and a share of the copyright.  I helped him (for a nice fee) pull together a team of university students to do it for class credit.)

 

9 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

OH MY! On another thread a poster mentioned Mel Tormé's autobiography  It Wasn't All Velvet -I promptly went to ABEBooks to buy it. I found a copy being sold by a charity Thrift Store, so bought it. I don't care so much about condition, just want to read it & like contributing to charity with my purchase. 

It arrived yesterday. It's signed "To Donna, Love Mel Tormé" and compared to my "To Susan, Best Always, Mel Tormé" received in person ca 1985. While not identical, appears authentic. The Thrift Store had 2 copies listed at $3.95 each, there was no mention either were signed copies, so I just lucked out.

This is the second time I purchased a book from a Thrift Store on ABEBooks & it came inscribed by the star - the other is Didn't You Used To Be George Murphy?

Up until the 1990s, buying and selling used books was a nice little sideline. I'd buy boxes of them at auctions (farm auctions were the best), sort them, and sell or cosign the good ones to bookstores/thrift shops/etc.. In the 20+ years I did it, I must found at least a hundred that'd been signed by the author. Sadly, none of them were first editions or any of the authors famous. I always saved them back because there was a great used bookshop in a city two hours away, and I knew they/their customers would appreciate them.   

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10 hours ago, Capuchin said:

Up until the 1990s, buying and selling used books was a nice little sideline.

My friend sold books as a sideline and paid off his college loan within two years, discarded SU textbooks was his bread & butter. He went to Animation school in Ottawa and now animates video games in San Francisco.

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