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Today I was reading about his devotion to Montgomery Clift in the latter's biography.   By 1955, Roddy's career was in a slump, before he regained his footing in a Broadway success a year or so later.  With not much to do, he would stop over at Monty's NYC brownstone and look for chores to do around the house, and run errands.  The author claims that McDowall was the only member of Monty's "family of friends" to remain close to him until Monty died on 7.23.1966.  Roddy McDowall died on 10.3.1998.

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McDowell was one of the few child stars to proceed to a long and fruitful adult acting career. He was also known for being the confidant to an untold number of movie stars, and probably knew more of what went on in Hollywood than any other person. Unlike a more spiteful person might have, he was honest and kept their secrets to himself. 

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I always liked Roddy McDowall.

He was so adorable as young Huw in HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY. He excelled in heroic roles (as the actor-turned-vampire hunter Peter Vincent in 1985's FRIGHT NIGHT) and as absolute heels (I already mentioned in a previous thread how deliciously nasty he was as the greedy nephew in one of the stories in the pilot of NIGHT GALLERY). 

He was one fine actor, without a doubt.

 

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2 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

 (I already mentioned in a previous thread how deliciously nasty he was as the greedy nephew in one of the stories in the pilot of NIGHT GALLERY).

Funny this should come up today, since just this afternoon, I had to specifically seek out this episode to complete my viewing of Night Gallery. Seems the station doesn't put the pilot and its 3 segments in the rotation. I have to admit, Roddy's segment became more and more familiar as it evolved, so I'm sure I've seen it before. Not so for "Eyes" with Joan Crawford or the Nazi-In-Hiding story.

"The Cemetery", "Eyes", and "The Escape Route" were all good stories, and justifiably worthy of a series, but, it became irregular in quality afterward.

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4 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

McDowell... was also known for being the confidant to an untold number of movie stars, and probably knew more of what went on in Hollywood than any other person. Unlike a more spiteful person might have, he was honest and kept their secrets to himself. 

I was told by well known people, on two separate occasions, in effect, "Roddy knew where all the bodies were buried and he took all his secrets with him."

If only everyone these days could keep a confidence as well!

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3 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

. He excelled in heroic roles (as the actor-turned-vampire hunter Peter Vincent in 1985's FRIGHT NIGHT)

Boy, he was fantastic in Fright Night, a film for which he was probably hired in all honesty just to get anybody with a Hollywood name. I think he was deserving of a Best Supporting Actor nomination for that movie.

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4 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I always liked Roddy McDowall.

He was so adorable as young Huw in HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY. He excelled in heroic roles (as the actor-turned-vampire hunter Peter Vincent in 1985's FRIGHT NIGHT) and as absolute heels (I already mentioned in a previous thread how deliciously nasty he was as the greedy nephew in one of the stories in the pilot of NIGHT GALLERY). 

He was one fine actor, without a doubt.

 

While Comparatively Speaking a Minor Role, i always enjoyed his turn as the cookey quirky toy guy in Linda Carter's Lovely Wonder Woman Show

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1 hour ago, yanceycravat said:

I was told by well known people, on two separate occasions, in effect, "Roddy knew where all the bodies were buried and he took all his secrets with him."

If only everyone these days could keep a confidence as well!

What A Day. That Would Be 

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15 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I always liked Roddy McDowall.

He was so adorable as young Huw in HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY.

 

I love the film "How Green Was My Valley" and Roddy McDowall as a child actor gave a sensitive performance as Huw - the youngest in a large family of coal miners.  Unfortunately, How Green Was My Valley is too often just thought of as the movie that beat out Citizen Kane for the best picture Oscar in 1941 (and I have to agree that Kane should have won) but it is still a really beautiful and moving film.  It's a powerful story about a coal mining village that's been destroyed environmentally, morally and socially.  The film was directed by John Ford and it's striking, expressionistic photography in some ways could be compared to Kane.  I love a story like How Green Was My Valley that focuses on the struggles of working people and gives them nobility.  McDowall's acting was amazing for his age and I don't think the movie would have worked so well without such a talented actor.

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15 hours ago, yanceycravat said:

I was told by well known people, on two separate occasions, in effect, "Roddy knew where all the bodies were buried and he took all his secrets with him."

If only everyone these days could keep a confidence as well!

I believe he left all of his papers with a university, with instructions that papers should not be made public until 100 years after his death, to ensure that no one mentioned in his papers would still be alive when they were made public. 

A studio blunder cost him a nomination for CLEOPATRA (1963) -- he was considered a shoo-in  for his performance -- but he should have been given a lifetime achievement Oscar for his contributions to cinema.  He is, in my opinion, a perfect example of someone for whom lifetime awards are made.  He didn't necessarily get the kinds of parts that garnered Oscar talk, but the cumulative effect of his work was deserving of an honor.   One of my favorites is his chilling performance in INSIDE DAISY CLOVER -- the way he haunts the periphery of that film, mostly silently observing, but interjecting the occasional cutting remark or devastating facial expression.

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15 hours ago, wbogacz said:

"The Cemetery", "Eyes", and "The Escape Route" were all good stories, and justifiably worthy of a series, but, it became irregular in quality afterward.

When you've watched NIGHT GALLERY, did you watch the syndicated half-hour versions or the DVDs?  The syndicated versions were often severely altered, with longer segments edited for time and shorter segments padded with irrelevant footage.   Having grown up with the edited versions, I found the original broadcast versions to be revelatory.  

Kino Lorber Studio Classics is releasing the series on Blu-ray, with season 1 coming in November.

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15 hours ago, PhillyCinephile said:

When you've watched NIGHT GALLERY, did you watch the syndicated half-hour versions or the DVDs?  The syndicated versions were often severely altered, with longer segments edited for time and shorter segments padded with irrelevant footage.   Having grown up with the edited versions, I found the original broadcast versions to be revelatory.  

Kino Lorber Studio Classics is releasing the series on Blu-ray, with season 1 coming in November.

I will look forward to the originals. I've been watching the syndication version on Comet, which plays mostly SciFi genre on its network.

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On 9/16/2021 at 10:02 PM, yanceycravat said:

I was told by well known people, on two separate occasions, in effect, "Roddy knew where all the bodies were buried and he took all his secrets with him."

If only everyone these days could keep a confidence as well!

The opposite of Scotty Bowers!  Though I think he was just an opportunistic liar.

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8 hours ago, Movie Collector OH said:

The opposite of Scotty Bowers!  Though I think he was just an opportunistic liar.

You can't be sued for saying anything against dead people.  And, of course, they're not here to defend or admit to anything that is said. Easy to fabricate a story line that fits your needs or wishful thinking.

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3 hours ago, yanceycravat said:

You can't be sued for saying anything against dead people.  And, of course, they're not here to defend or admit to anything that is said. Easy to fabricate a story line that fits your needs or wishful thinking.

That reminds me of a blog my girlfriend was following at the time of some Hollywood columnist, she showed me a few posts.  I thought it was pretty funny and in good taste.  The author of the blog was reading Scotty's book (original plan was probably to go from cover to cover), and he attempted to trace Bowers' steps and connect some dots, presumably to see if Bowers could tell a straight story.  As I recall he didn't get that far into it.  Not sure what the outcome of that ever was, though he probably just got bored with it.  I know I would.

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