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I admit it: I love "It's Always Fair Weather"


brianNH
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Years ago, whenever this movie would show up somewhere, I would turn the channel after just a few minutes.  Not sure why, but I did.  Then I sat through the thing; then sat through it again.  And again.  And one day I found myself absolutely enchanted by this movie.  Since then it has become one of my favorite musicals, and I will go to battle with anyone who tries to talk me out of dropping it from my top 2 or 3 joys! (please don't let that discourage anyone -- most of you probably have a good 15 to 20 years on me, so have at it!)

Most movies go by at a fairly good pace, but in my opinion IAFW has not a wasted second in it.  The story and characters are well-fleshed out with fine precision.  Though the story has at its core a rather bittersweet premise, everything that unfolds from it is a terrific carousel ride with some very convincing character development.

In contrast to much of the Freed Unit productions, this movie's colors are subdued --- neutral grays and browns for a good portion of the film.  The songs are top drawer, really top drawer -- outstanding contributions from Comden & Green and Andre Previn.  Aurally, it's a joy and delight.  The dances then are inventively wonderful to watch as well.

I'll admit that in the last few years the Gene Kelly star has lost some of its shine for me, but he is engaging  in this film.  Though I know Dan Daily was a song and dance man, it still surprises me that he is on screen singing and dancing!  And when Michael Kidd is in the picture, he's the one I focus my attention on.  Now, I'll match Cyd Charisse's number in Stillman's Gym against anything else she's done.  And then there's that voluptuous volcano of an entertainer in Dolores Gray!  (How does anyone even think of combining Clifton Webb and Marlon Brando into a perfect man!)

So I'll admit it:  I love "It's Always Fair Weather."  I'll shout it from the rooftops, and I don't care who knows it.  So who's with me on this?  Any takers? 

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55 minutes ago, brianNH said:

Years ago, whenever this movie would show up somewhere, I would turn the channel after just a few minutes.  Not sure why, but I did.  Then I sat through the thing; then sat through it again.  And again.  And one day I found myself absolutely enchanted by this movie.  Since then it has become one of my favorite musicals, and I will go to battle with anyone who tries to talk me out of dropping it from my top 2 or 3 joys! (please don't let that discourage anyone -- most of you probably have a good 15 to 20 years on me, so have at it!)

Most movies go by at a fairly good pace, but in my opinion IAFW has not a wasted second in it.  The story and characters are well-fleshed out with fine precision.  Though the story has at its core a rather bittersweet premise, everything that unfolds from it is a terrific carousel ride with some very convincing character development.

In contrast to much of the Freed Unit productions, this movie's colors are subdued --- neutral grays and browns for a good portion of the film.  The songs are top drawer, really top drawer -- outstanding contributions from Comden & Green and Andre Previn.  Aurally, it's a joy and delight.  The dances then are inventively wonderful to watch as well.

I'll admit that in the last few years the Gene Kelly star has lost some of its shine for me, but he is engaging  in this film.  Though I know Dan Daily was a song and dance man, it still surprises me that he is on screen singing and dancing!  And when Michael Kidd is in the picture, he's the one I focus my attention on.  Now, I'll match Cyd Charisse's number in Stillman's Gym against anything else she's done.  And then there's that voluptuous volcano of an entertainer in Dolores Gray!  (How does anyone even think of combining Clifton Webb and Marlon Brando into a perfect man!)

So I'll admit it:  I love "It's Always Fair Weather."  I'll shout it from the rooftops, and I don't care who knows it.  So who's with me on this?  Any takers? 

So Do I.

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13 hours ago, brianNH said:

Years ago, whenever this movie would show up somewhere, I would turn the channel after just a few minutes.  Not sure why, but I did.  Then I sat through the thing; then sat through it again.  And again.  And one day I found myself absolutely enchanted by this movie.  Since then it has become one of my favorite musicals, and I will go to battle with anyone who tries to talk me out of dropping it from my top 2 or 3 joys! (please don't let that discourage anyone -- most of you probably have a good 15 to 20 years on me, so have at it!)

Most movies go by at a fairly good pace, but in my opinion IAFW has not a wasted second in it.  The story and characters are well-fleshed out with fine precision.  Though the story has at its core a rather bittersweet premise, everything that unfolds from it is a terrific carousel ride with some very convincing character development.

In contrast to much of the Freed Unit productions, this movie's colors are subdued --- neutral grays and browns for a good portion of the film.  The songs are top drawer, really top drawer -- outstanding contributions from Comden & Green and Andre Previn.  Aurally, it's a joy and delight.  The dances then are inventively wonderful to watch as well.

I'll admit that in the last few years the Gene Kelly star has lost some of its shine for me, but he is engaging  in this film.  Though I know Dan Daily was a song and dance man, it still surprises me that he is on screen singing and dancing!  And when Michael Kidd is in the picture, he's the one I focus my attention on.  Now, I'll match Cyd Charisse's number in Stillman's Gym against anything else she's done.  And then there's that voluptuous volcano of an entertainer in Dolores Gray!  (How does anyone even think of combining Clifton Webb and Marlon Brando into a perfect man!)

So I'll admit it:  I love "It's Always Fair Weather."  I'll shout it from the rooftops, and I don't care who knows it.  So who's with me on this?  Any takers? 

Gotta say here Brian, your history with and your growing appreciation for this film somewhat mirrors mine, and evidenced by after a recent viewing of it on TCM, I found myself liking this movie much more than I remember having done in the past. Especially good point about that terrific Cyd Charisse number with all the boxers. 

(...btw, ever noticed that a very similar resolution of this storyline, the one of mobsters being unwittingly televised while disrupting a TV program, would later be used in the 1982 comedy My Favorite Year ?)

 

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Thanks, Dargo.  I think at first I had some reluctance to get past what seemed like a hokey start -- the three army buddies marching along to the backdrop screens.  But once I stayed until when the three sang "The Time for Parting,"  I was hooked -- and I knew it!  That's one heck of a song for the plot point there, and the movie just sailed right along for me after that.  Yes, Cyd goes a full 15 rounds in that ring with the Stillman Gym Alumni Association.

One other thing I always notice in this movie in particular.  Dan Daily's "Situation-wise" -- the three-sheets-to-the-wind, sloshed to the gills song and dance number.  I wonder what it must be like to wake up in the morning, go to work, and then surrender all your inhibitions to lay yourself completely exposed to perform the number.  I know he's an actor and all, but to go out in front of fellow cast members and full crew and simply go nuts!  I find that ability extraordinary -- and mystifying. 

Well, I'm glad we've found some fellow enthusiasts.  We must form a club and meet once every 10 years at a bar somewhere.

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7 hours ago, Dargo said:

 

(...btw, ever noticed that a very similar resolution of this storyline, the one of mobsters being unwittingly televised while disrupting a TV program, would later be used in the 1982 comedy My Favorite Year ?)

 

I thought I was the only one who noticed this.  

I teach writing at the college level, and every time I read a student write "financial-wise" or "education-wise," I both laugh and cringe as I think of Dan Daily's crazy number.

 

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4 hours ago, rosebette said:

I thought I was the only one who noticed this.  

I teach writing at the college level, and every time I read a student write "financial-wise" or "education-wise," I both laugh and cringe as I think of Dan Daily's crazy number.

 

I've noticed several 50s/early 60s era films that use the "-wise" suffix on words (The Apartment comes first to mind).  I guess that was a thing in business-speak back then...

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3 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

I've noticed several 50s/early 60s era films that use the "-wise" suffix on words (The Apartment comes first to mind).  I guess that was a thing in business-speak back then...

Yep, but ya know Tex. NOBODY will ever be as darn cute doin this as Shirley MacLaine was when she added that suffix to the word  "cookie" in that Wilder flick.  ;)

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