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Bob Newhart: The Introvert’s Hero


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This is from my blog, The Classic Film Connection. I originally posted it on September 6th (the day after Bob’s 92nd birthday). While it’s mostly about his work in television, I also cover what I feel are his most notable film roles. I’d love to know your thoughts and favorites, too - so I thought it was still message board relevant. 🙂

Bob Newhart: The Introvert’s Hero

I’m a day late – but I’d like to dedicate this post as a birthday wish / tribute to the first person who showed me it’s OK to be an introvert…

img_2104.jpg?w=640

Several years ago, I landed my first real, grown-up, full-time job: a leadership position, in which I was responsible for overseeing multiple programs involving large groups of people. I also worked as part of a team of fellow leaders – all of whom were extroverted to a large degree.

I stuck out like a sore thumb. Eventually, in our staff meetings, I began to hear never-ending choruses proclaiming how different I was. (The refrain usually began with, “You’re so quiet!” – and variations of that theme went on from there.)

While I’ve often felt different, I never thought of myself as quiet – and I certainly didn’t equate quiet with bad. A supervisor re-introduced me to the terms introvert and extrovert (concepts I hadn’t heard since college) – although he would say “introvert” with such disdain, it sounded like a curse. And it was hard not to take on the idea that my introverted nature made me inferior – especially when that was so often, and so strongly, implied. It was harder still to lead and to do my job well when I felt undercut as a person.

img_2079.jpg?w=518

Enter Bob Newhart. In the midst of my personal crisis, I discovered The Bob Newhart Show by accident. (I remember I had quickly picked up dinner – and I was so hungry, I flipped on the TV and turned to a classic station, not caring what was on.) The episode I landed on charmed me, which led me to seek out the beginning of the series. Minutes into episode 1, I realized why I was drawn to this show: he was me.

I was watching a male, middle-aged version of myself. He talked like me (I even stammer somewhat), thought like me, and functioned as I did in a work group, at home, and as a leader. He was the first true introvert I’d ever seen on screen, and the connection was strong. It was my first step in embracing who I am.

img_2106.jpg?w=749

And this connection grew even stronger when I researched the man himself and realized he was much more than the “name” of the show. Sure, it wasn’t all on him – there were directors, writers, and producers working together to make the magic happen – but major decisions required HIS approval. There was no mistake as to whose show this was – in title, on camera, and behind the scenes.

That’s not to say he was dictatorial. The cast and crew largely seemed to function like a happy family. Everyone had a part to play, but in terms of taking on personal responsibility for the show’s success, Bob was certainly the leader of the team. In fact, the Name / Star / Silent Creative Glue role suited him so well, he repeated it over and over again (with the hugely successful Newhart, then Bob, followed by George & Leo – although I’m not sure how much behind-the-scenes involvement he had in the last one).

This inspired me. I bought books on the power of introverts and being an introverted leader, I carried myself with enough confidence at work to at least not feel compelled to cave and change myself just to fit in – and I watched as much of The Bob Newhart Show as I could get my hands on. It was my go-to, especially when I felt misunderstood. I made it through all six seasons in no time – and I still come back to it regularly.

img_2085.jpg?w=792

Of course, the television shows came as a result of the mark he’d already made as a significant presence in stand-up comedy. His debut album, The Button-Down Mind of Bob Newhart, became a bestseller. It reached #1 on the Billboard charts – and remains the 20th best-selling comedy album of all time.

His rise was meteoric. In a recent interview with WGN News, he relays that Button-Down Mind was recorded during his first-ever nightclub appearance (which was booked for the sole purpose of recording the album!). After its success, he says, “every day was New Year’s”. He appeared often on The Dean Martin Showand The Ed Sullivan Show, and hosted his own variety show (the very first, and Peabody Award-winning, The Bob Newhart Show) – which propelled him to his legendary phase as a sitcom star.

I have no doubt the chief reason he garnered so much positive attention so fast (aside from the obvious fact that he is, indeed, very funny and clever) is because he was different. He was quiet. He was thoughtful. He fumbled for words. He listened. (Heck, his most well-known stand-up shtick revolves around his side of telephone conversations!) He was an introvert.

His unwavering resolve to stay true to himself rewarded him with a remarkable career – and I venture to say it’s a large part of why he’s 92 (as of September 5th) and, if the WGN News interview from about 8 months ago I referenced earlier is any indication, still going strong. You can watch it here. (It’s delightful, by the way. His button-down mind is still as sharp as a tack!)

img_2094.jpg?w=640

The cinematic side of his career is less illustrious, but there are notable highlights: 

– His telephone act was brilliantly worked into his character for his first film role – a featured part in a lesser-known war picture, Hell is for Heroes (1962), starring Steve McQueen.

– His perfectly over-the-top performance in Norman Lear’s comical satire, Cold Turkey(1971), deserves more attention. (In his long career, Bob has occasionally played the exact opposite of his well-known personality – always in a crazed, lampooning fashion that’s a perfect spoof of extreme extroversion…See evidence above.)

– He achieved Disney immortality (and was perfectly cast) as Bernard the Mouse in the animated classics, The Rescuers (1977) and The Rescuers Down Under (1990). 

– And who can forget lovable Papa Elf, in the holiday hit, Elf (2003)? (Again, perfectly cast!)

img_2131.jpg?w=740

But his performances extend beyond the realms of comedy and family fun. There’s his early role in “How To Get Rid of Your Wife”, an episode of The Alfred Hitchcock Hour – which I haven’t seen yet, but hope to soon, as I’ve recently learned the entire series is available on Peacock. Granted, from what I’ve read, it does seem to be a comically-tinted episode – but there has to be some seriousness and suspense to it, because a) it’s Alfred Hitchcock, and b) THIS Bob Newhart is most certainly up to something and is decidedly NOT being funny:

img_2107.jpg?w=1024

And there’s his three-episode stint on ER, of which I’ve only seen the first, because ER is generally too much for me anyway – plus I’ve read spoilers and know what happens. (Besides, my heart is still recovering from his appearance on NCIS.) But I do want to see it. I think comedians can make the best dramatic actors, so I love to watch when one steps out and tries. And it’s not like I don’t have the opportunity, since all of ER is on Hulu…I will watch it. I will. I’ll steel myself, and I will. (Now that I’ve put it in writing, I have to follow through.)

img_2124.jpg?w=744

Regardless of who or in what genre he plays, all of Bob’s characters share this uniquely personal touch that springs from him being so firmly and assuredly grounded in himself.

img_2118-2.jpg?w=737

And if you’re an introvert who, like me, needs to feel represented, seen, and understood – seek out The Bob Newhart Show. It’s very ‘70s, but it makes for excellent therapy. (*And all 6 seasons are now on Hulu!*)

img_2112-3.jpg?w=732

It’s funny. Entertainment is supposed to be just that – entertaining. And as such, I guess it’s not designed to truly be taken seriously. But occasionally, something or someone you see on screen can impact you in a life-changing way: like one character in a sitcom entirely redefining how you value yourself.

That goes so far beyond mere entertainment. It’s the power of art – and the power of someone unwaveringly and uncompromisingly showing up in the world as himself.

So, if you’ll indulge me a moment while I send this personal message out into cyberspace: Hi, Bob. Happy 92nd birthday. Thanks for being this introvert’s hero.

***

So, what do you think? What are your favorite Bob Newhart moments? And whose work goes beyond entertainment for you? Also, are there any fellow introverts out there?

(Feel free to comment here, of course - and, if you’d like to receive notification when I post something new on my blog, go here to subscribe via email or follow me on WordPress. I’d love to connect with you there, too!)

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25 minutes ago, LuckyDan said:

No mention of his major, major role in Catch-22? A favorite scene in a favorite movie. Newhart and Fell acting Buck Henry dialogue. 

Note the portrait behind the desk. 

@LuckyDan 😄 Ah, yes - how could I forget Major Major? Actually, I have seen Catch-22 once (during my “discovering Bob Newhart” deep-dive phase ☺️), and between Charles Grodin’s storyline and the reveal about the flashback, I think I mentally blocked it. 🙈 But that was several years ago. I’d probably appreciate it much more now, especially since I know what I’m in for.
 

I certainly enjoyed that clip! 😆 I had to watch twice to catch all the portraits. I love the subtle change in his voice and personality, too. The little dictator. ☺️ So funny. (And of course, can’t forget that mound of paperwork! 😄) I need to seek this one out again and give it another try. Thanks for the reminder! 😊

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1 hour ago, Jillian Atchley said:
This is from my blog, The Classic Film Connection. I originally posted it on September 6th (the day after Bob’s 92nd birthday). While it’s mostly about his work in television, I also cover what I feel are his most notable film roles. I’d love to know your thoughts and favorites, too - so I thought it was still message board relevant. 🙂

Bob Newhart: The Introvert’s Hero

I’m a day late – but I’d like to dedicate this post as a birthday wish / tribute to the first person who showed me it’s OK to be an introvert…

img_2104.jpg?w=640

Several years ago, I landed my first real, grown-up, full-time job: a leadership position, in which I was responsible for overseeing multiple programs involving large groups of people. I also worked as part of a team of fellow leaders – all of whom were extroverted to a large degree.

I stuck out like a sore thumb. Eventually, in our staff meetings, I began to hear never-ending choruses proclaiming how different I was. (The refrain usually began with, “You’re so quiet!” – and variations of that theme went on from there.)

While I’ve often felt different, I never thought of myself as quiet – and I certainly didn’t equate quiet with bad. A supervisor re-introduced me to the terms introvert and extrovert (concepts I hadn’t heard since college) – although he would say “introvert” with such disdain, it sounded like a curse. And it was hard not to take on the idea that my introverted nature made me inferior – especially when that was so often, and so strongly, implied. It was harder still to lead and to do my job well when I felt undercut as a person.

img_2079.jpg?w=518

Enter Bob Newhart. In the midst of my personal crisis, I discovered The Bob Newhart Show by accident. (I remember I had quickly picked up dinner – and I was so hungry, I flipped on the TV and turned to a classic station, not caring what was on.) The episode I landed on charmed me, which led me to seek out the beginning of the series. Minutes into episode 1, I realized why I was drawn to this show: he was me.

I was watching a male, middle-aged version of myself. He talked like me (I even stammer somewhat), thought like me, and functioned as I did in a work group, at home, and as a leader. He was the first true introvert I’d ever seen on screen, and the connection was strong. It was my first step in embracing who I am.

img_2106.jpg?w=749

And this connection grew even stronger when I researched the man himself and realized he was much more than the “name” of the show. Sure, it wasn’t all on him – there were directors, writers, and producers working together to make the magic happen – but major decisions required HIS approval. There was no mistake as to whose show this was – in title, on camera, and behind the scenes.

That’s not to say he was dictatorial. The cast and crew largely seemed to function like a happy family. Everyone had a part to play, but in terms of taking on personal responsibility for the show’s success, Bob was certainly the leader of the team. In fact, the Name / Star / Silent Creative Glue role suited him so well, he repeated it over and over again (with the hugely successful Newhart, then Bob, followed by George & Leo – although I’m not sure how much behind-the-scenes involvement he had in the last one).

This inspired me. I bought books on the power of introverts and being an introverted leader, I carried myself with enough confidence at work to at least not feel compelled to cave and change myself just to fit in – and I watched as much of The Bob Newhart Show as I could get my hands on. It was my go-to, especially when I felt misunderstood. I made it through all six seasons in no time – and I still come back to it regularly.

img_2085.jpg?w=792

Of course, the television shows came as a result of the mark he’d already made as a significant presence in stand-up comedy. His debut album, The Button-Down Mind of Bob Newhart, became a bestseller. It reached #1 on the Billboard charts – and remains the 20th best-selling comedy album of all time.

His rise was meteoric. In a recent interview with WGN News, he relays that Button-Down Mind was recorded during his first-ever nightclub appearance (which was booked for the sole purpose of recording the album!). After its success, he says, “every day was New Year’s”. He appeared often on The Dean Martin Showand The Ed Sullivan Show, and hosted his own variety show (the very first, and Peabody Award-winning, The Bob Newhart Show) – which propelled him to his legendary phase as a sitcom star.

I have no doubt the chief reason he garnered so much positive attention so fast (aside from the obvious fact that he is, indeed, very funny and clever) is because he was different. He was quiet. He was thoughtful. He fumbled for words. He listened. (Heck, his most well-known stand-up shtick revolves around his side of telephone conversations!) He was an introvert.

His unwavering resolve to stay true to himself rewarded him with a remarkable career – and I venture to say it’s a large part of why he’s 92 (as of September 5th) and, if the WGN News interview from about 8 months ago I referenced earlier is any indication, still going strong. You can watch it here. (It’s delightful, by the way. His button-down mind is still as sharp as a tack!)

img_2094.jpg?w=640

The cinematic side of his career is less illustrious, but there are notable highlights: 

– His telephone act was brilliantly worked into his character for his first film role – a featured part in a lesser-known war picture, Hell is for Heroes (1962), starring Steve McQueen.

– His perfectly over-the-top performance in Norman Lear’s comical satire, Cold Turkey(1971), deserves more attention. (In his long career, Bob has occasionally played the exact opposite of his well-known personality – always in a crazed, lampooning fashion that’s a perfect spoof of extreme extroversion…See evidence above.)

– He achieved Disney immortality (and was perfectly cast) as Bernard the Mouse in the animated classics, The Rescuers (1977) and The Rescuers Down Under (1990). 

– And who can forget lovable Papa Elf, in the holiday hit, Elf (2003)? (Again, perfectly cast!)

img_2131.jpg?w=740

But his performances extend beyond the realms of comedy and family fun. There’s his early role in “How To Get Rid of Your Wife”, an episode of The Alfred Hitchcock Hour – which I haven’t seen yet, but hope to soon, as I’ve recently learned the entire series is available on Peacock. Granted, from what I’ve read, it does seem to be a comically-tinted episode – but there has to be some seriousness and suspense to it, because a) it’s Alfred Hitchcock, and b) THIS Bob Newhart is most certainly up to something and is decidedly NOT being funny:

img_2107.jpg?w=1024

And there’s his three-episode stint on ER, of which I’ve only seen the first, because ER is generally too much for me anyway – plus I’ve read spoilers and know what happens. (Besides, my heart is still recovering from his appearance on NCIS.) But I do want to see it. I think comedians can make the best dramatic actors, so I love to watch when one steps out and tries. And it’s not like I don’t have the opportunity, since all of ER is on Hulu…I will watch it. I will. I’ll steel myself, and I will. (Now that I’ve put it in writing, I have to follow through.)

img_2124.jpg?w=744

Regardless of who or in what genre he plays, all of Bob’s characters share this uniquely personal touch that springs from him being so firmly and assuredly grounded in himself.

img_2118-2.jpg?w=737

And if you’re an introvert who, like me, needs to feel represented, seen, and understood – seek out The Bob Newhart Show. It’s very ‘70s, but it makes for excellent therapy. (*And all 6 seasons are now on Hulu!*)

img_2112-3.jpg?w=732

It’s funny. Entertainment is supposed to be just that – entertaining. And as such, I guess it’s not designed to truly be taken seriously. But occasionally, something or someone you see on screen can impact you in a life-changing way: like one character in a sitcom entirely redefining how you value yourself.

That goes so far beyond mere entertainment. It’s the power of art – and the power of someone unwaveringly and uncompromisingly showing up in the world as himself.

So, if you’ll indulge me a moment while I send this personal message out into cyberspace: Hi, Bob. Happy 92nd birthday. Thanks for being this introvert’s hero.

***

So, what do you think? What are your favorite Bob Newhart moments? And whose work goes beyond entertainment for you? Also, are there any fellow introverts out there?

(Feel free to comment here, of course - and, if you’d like to receive notification when I post something new on my blog, go here to subscribe via email or follow me on WordPress. I’d love to connect with you there, too!)

My Favourite Roles of His for me are Bernard.. 🐹

   Also, As Himself. Anticlimactically Enough. As Stumbling Bumbling WML Mystery Guest.  Have Always Enjoyed Watching B. Serf's Eyebrows do the Hokey-Pokey when Bob Starts Into His Twister Talk During This Particular Episode 

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31 minutes ago, Jillian Atchley said:

@LuckyDan 😄 Ah, yes - how could I forget Major Major? Actually, I have seen Catch-22 once (during my “discovering Bob Newhart” deep-dive phase ☺️), and between Charles Grodin’s storyline and the reveal about the flashback, I think I mentally blocked it. 🙈 But that was several years ago. I’d probably appreciate it much more now, especially since I know what I’m in for.
 

I certainly enjoyed that clip! 😆 I had to watch twice to catch all the portraits. I love the subtle change in his voice and personality, too. The little dictator. ☺️ So funny. (And of course, can’t forget that mound of paperwork! 😄) I need to seek this one out again and give it another try. Thanks for the reminder! 😊

I will be interested in your thoughts after you revisit it. 

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I don't know how to do 'links' to YouTube, but if you go there and type this is in the 'Subject Bar' you will find it amusing at the least and downright hilarious at the most if you've not seen it:

BOB NEWHART - Interview Nightmare (In its complete context!).  👽

 

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I was first introduced to Newhart via his records - very funny.  If not already mentioned, he use of the telephone in many episodes were a take off on his records.  I did watch the Bob Newhart Show and enjoyed it when it originally aired, but I believe the later Newhart was much better.  I bought the DVD's of Newhart.  His next series didn't work out and was cancelled.

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Yeah, we all loved us some Newhart  back in "the day".  his stand-up telephone bits were hilarious as was his bit as the driver's ed instructor.  And it was delightful seeing him show up in the WWII flick HELL IS FOR HEROES ('62)  among that high-powered all star cast.  And somehow the screenwriters found a way to have his character do a phone conversation bit!  ;) 

Here, Bob reprises his classic bit  :D

 

Sepiatone

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

Yeah, we all loved us some Newhart  back in "the day".  his stand-up telephone bits were hilarious as was his bit as the driver's ed instructor.  And it was delightful seeing him show up in the WWII flick HELL IS FOR HEROES ('62)  among that high-powered all star cast.  And somehow the screenwriters found a way to have his character do a phone conversation bit!  ;) 

Here, Bob reprises his classic bit  :D

 

Sepiatone

You might know this already Sepia, but reportedly, director Don Siegel felt that Newhart and his comic relief character was foisted upon him by the producers of this film.

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16 hours ago, David Proulx said:

I didn't know he was still alive. How could anyone not love Bob Newhart. He's the straight man who gets the laughs. He's the lovable guy who everything happens to. He's always been so understated, and his timing impeccable. I can't believe he's been working this late in life.

@David Proulx Awww…What a perfect description of him! 🥰 In his TV shows, he was the epitome of the “only sane man” as well. 

Yes, he was even still doing stand-up until the pandemic! He must really love it. Actually, before watching some recent interviews, I’d wondered if not having that outlet for so long would be detrimental to his health - but he still seems to be doing well. 😊 

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11 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

I don't know how to do 'links' to YouTube, but if you go there and type this is in the 'Subject Bar' you will find it amusing at the least and downright hilarious at the most if you've not seen it:

BOB NEWHART - Interview Nightmare (In its complete context!).  👽

 

@Mr. Gorman Oh, my goodness - that was so funny! 😄 A very slow build-up - but the more things go wrong, the funnier it gets. ☺️

And the timing couldn’t be better. I just finished listening to his Stars in the House interview / reunion with the remaining TBNS and Newhart cast and crew last night - and they talked about this episode! I believe Julia Duffy said it was one of her favorites. Between what each of them remembered, they described it in detail - Bob even remembered the “Up the Amazon” title. ☺️ She said, for her, it was a toss-up between this episode and “the world’s smallest horse” (which sounds familiar, but I don’t recall the details). They didn’t talk about that one very much. Once this one was mentioned, they just went off on it. 😊 I think they all love it. 

Incidentally, Peter Scolari wasn’t part of this interview/reunion, unfortunately - but this seems to be his first appearance! 😃 Michael before all the annoying alliteration. 😉

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7 hours ago, ElCid said:

I was first introduced to Newhart via his records - very funny.  If not already mentioned, he use of the telephone in many episodes were a take off on his records.  I did watch the Bob Newhart Show and enjoyed it when it originally aired, but I believe the later Newhart was much better.  I bought the DVD's of Newhart.  His next series didn't work out and was cancelled.

@ElCid I enjoy his stand-up, too. 😊 I’ve had his Something Like This collection for a long time - and only recently realized that it doesn’t include EVERY routine (duh! ☺️). So, I’m now working my way through the individual albums on Apple Music. Of all that I’ve heard so far, I think my favorite is still “The Driving Instructor”. 

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Yeah, we all loved us some Newhart  back in "the day".  his stand-up telephone bits were hilarious as was his bit as the driver's ed instructor.  And it was delightful seeing him show up in the WWII flick HELL IS FOR HEROES ('62)  among that high-powered all star cast.  And somehow the screenwriters found a way to have his character do a phone conversation bit!  ;) 

Here, Bob reprises his classic bit  :D

 

Sepiatone

@Sepiatone Ah - I just mentioned in my reply to @ElCid that “The Driving Instructor” is my favorite! 😃 This was so neat to see!

I LOVE when he says, “Let me get a chair”, and someone whispers, “He’s going to do ‘The Driving Instructor’.” They know immediately. 🥰 Also, someone nearby had a GREAT laugh. (I think it may be the guy filming?) And inducted into The Library of Congress - wow! 😃

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On 9/19/2021 at 1:23 PM, Dargo said:

You might know this already Sepia, but reportedly, director Don Siegel felt that Newhart and his comic relief character was foisted upon him by the producers of this film.

@Dargo I didn’t know that! 😲 How unfortunate for everybody - Bob included. I have Hell is for Heroes on DVD, but I’ve only watched it once. I need to revisit it. From what I can remember, I found it very disjointed - and Newhart and the clever way they worked in his telephone routine was the only part I actually enjoyed. (Wasn’t it supposed to be fake conversations to throw off the enemy or something?…I love how he’s so nervous about it at first, then later on he’s leaning back - all chill, like, “I do this all the time. No big deal.” ☺️)

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If BOB NEWHART hadn't quit smoking in 1985 it's not likely he would've have lived into the 1990s.  He developed a nosebleed that wouldn't stop and that precipitated him quitting at age 56. 

I don't think Newhart smoked on-camera when filming "The Bob Newhart Show" or the early seasons of "Newhart", but he definitely was a heavy smoker off-camera. 

And Bob is still around 92 thanks to that decision to quit.  (You can read about his medical scare on 'nickiswift.com' with the heading "WHY BOB NEWHART WAS ONCE HOSPITALIZED").

(→ If you wanna scare someone into what can happen if you don't quit the cigarettes, but still live on, check out the YouTube video "REDD FOXX -- LOST INTERVIEW".  It's not long; only four minutes and 20 seconds.  Redd's in a New Orleans nightclub being interviewed by a gentleman named 'Allen Stewart'.  It's from January 1988.  Foxx had turned 65 in Dec. 1987 and the years of chain-smoking cigarettes along with marijuana (he called it "gangster" in one of his stand-up acts.  As in "I don't smoke gangster on stage") +plus+ breathing in secondhand smoke from all the old-time nightclubs has him gasping for breath.  I felt bad for Redd; having quit smoking myself I reckon breathing with bad emphysema is like sucking air through a screen door that's not supposed to have •holes• in it).   

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19 hours ago, Jillian Atchley said:

@unwatchable Interesting…I’ve never seen it before. Thanks. 🙂

Bad Day at Black Rock is an excellent movie.  You can find a description and cast list on many sites.

One small discrepancy.  Spencer Tracy gets off the train at beginning of movie.  At end he gets on the train to go home.  However, he got on the same train going direction of one he got off of.  In reality, he would have gotten on the one making the "return trip" to where he came from.  Of course he could be going somewhere else first.

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