Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Popular movies that you hate


Recommended Posts

On 9/21/2021 at 10:28 PM, Swithin said:

 

...I think the only movie that I really HATE is Brazil (1985), a revolting, pretentious pile of ....  But it's not really a popular movie......

 

I never liked Brazil  either. It's depressing and, as you say,  pretentious.   Although I love Monty Python and by extension,  most work by its alumni,  I do think Terry Gilliam goes awry now and then.  But as you said,  it's not exactly a well-known and popular  movie, anyway.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/22/2021 at 8:13 AM, Bethluvsfilms said:

I'm an adult and I still love the film. 

Maybe I'm just an old softie, but I love movies that can touch your heart and E.T. did that for me. My mom was already over 40 when the movie came out and she loved the movie and still does.

 

Not arguing with you here,  Beth,  but the exchange between you and Dargo about how you first saw E.T.  as a child,  while he first saw it as an adult,  raises an interesting point.

You still love E.T., even now that you're an adult.  But you first saw it as a kid.  I think movies we saw for the first time and loved when we were children make a deep impression on us,  we carry that impression,  the enjoyment and emotional impact we experienced when we were young,  on into adulthood.

I liked E.T. well enough -- I saw it as a young adult.   However,  movies I first saw as a kid and loved,  I still love.  I can't separate the feeling of wonder/ excitement/  amusement/  whatever the film engendered in my child self,  from seeing it years later as an adult.  And I think that's just part of being human,  it's kind of nice.

I bet most people first saw "The Wizard of Oz" as a child,  and I'd be surprised if most who did so don't still hold a soft spot for this famous and well-beloved movie.    ( just an example.)

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/22/2021 at 8:17 AM, Bethluvsfilms said:

Now I can certainly understand your feelings about A CLOCKWORK ORANGE. And I'm one of those who consider it a classic.

It certainly is a difficult film to watch, and Alex DeLarge (Malcolm McDowell) has to be one of the most repulsive characters to be put on film, but as bizarre and terrible as it may sound, he's still one of those characters that you can't take your eyes off of. 

McDowell himself said in an interview that Alex was a wicked SOB. I certainly can't dispute that. Yet he does do a good job in also making Alex human. You're reminded that for all the evil that Alex does in the first half of the movie, he's still a human being. 

Not to turn this thread into a discussion on Clockwork Orange, but just a couple of thoughts I've always had about it...

I've always found it interesting that Alex loves classical music,  particularly Beethoven.  It's kind of a redeeming quality in his otherwise vile character.  Yet this passion he has for music seems to be inextricably mixed up with his love for "ultra-violence".  When he is captured and "re-programmed",  the  government behaviourists  (or whatever you want to call them)  make sure Alex's  "rehabilitation" treatment includes the playing of some of his favourite classical pieces  ( while forcing him to watch  videos of violent acts,  all the while making him  ingest drugs that make him sick ).

It's so difficult to reconcile Alex's love for great, beautiful, and moving music with his love for sadistic acts.  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

I never liked Brazil  either. It's depressing and, as you say,  pretentious

I watched Brazil one time on a VHS from Blockbuster when I was in college, and I have to say it's pretty visually brilliant, as are most Terry Gilliam movies. The gut-wrenching impact of the (sort of) shock ending had an effect on me. I think at the time I would have labeled it genius, although I note I haven't watched it in the intervening years. knowing that it's all heading for that sad ending makes it too much of a slog for me to want to watch again. 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

@FXREYMAN:  On the previous page, Mr. Rey, I noted a 'Laundry List' of -- more or less -- popular movies that you mention not liking.  ► You sure you're not trolling us just a lil' bit?  🤔 In order to dislike all of those movies you'd have to watch them all in their entirety and then 'dislike' them.   → That's a lot of unhappy  😡 viewing hours, Rey!  Cheer UP!  🙃

In regards to SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER (1977) -- what is it about this movie you don't like?  After all, if you don't care for all of the 'cuss words' and street language in the original, [R]-rated theatrical version there is always the alternative [PG]-rated version which is missing many of those words and the seamier elements.  There's even a TV version available that's even cleaner + has several extra scenes not included in any other version.  → So there's options for you, Rey, if the dirty language of the original SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER put you off. 

ALSO:  The "Halloween" movies are not all the same.  HALLOWEEN III:  SEASON OF THE WITCH is very unlike the original "Halloween" from '78 and "Halloween II" from '81.  The original isn't very gory.  The second one is definitely gorier.  The third one is full of sinister bugs with a plot •hole• you could drive a truck thru. 

HALLOWEEN 4 was a decent horror movie until the typically stupid ending to keep the franchise going . . . I rather liked it even though the ending was silly -- Michael Myers being shot 100 times and not dying.  

As for "The Misfits" . . .  the movie really doesn't have much of an ending does it?   Rather non-descript, I must say. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

I love it when people say crap like that.  I never understand though, how people can make claims like that which admit they just don't GET it.  Like...

A CLOCKWORK ORANGE was SUPPOSED to be disturbing.  That was the POINT!   And the only disturbing thing I can find about 2001 is it's way too ambiguous ending.  But seeing it in a cinerama theater on a hit of mescaline makes it more enjoyable.  ;) 

 

i remember very well i was 16 at the time somebody in the UK -i think-killed somebody in the street coming out of the theater, i remember my feelings then when i saw the fillm and  it could disturb vulnerable people the wrong way

Link to post
Share on other sites

Star Wars :i I have seen- the first 3 on their first run,even the first a second time well it was in Hollywood...but no interest about anything regarding the whole thing,the toys,the conventions the other films etc same thing with StarTrek .Went to see the first film when it was released a real bore if i remember well.No interest in the tv series at all,.l hear a lot of 'Trekkies knows all the dialogue  by heart well to each his own .

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/23/2021 at 11:23 AM, TomJH said:

Someone said you have to read the book by Arthur C. Clarke to understand the ending. Well, if that it the case, what does that saying about Kubrick's deficiencies  as a filmmaker?

I was told the same thing, but it wasn't true for me. Kubrick's "deficiency" is that he was trying to make a different kind of film. Brazil is similar in that respect.

It's like musicals, you can't explain why you enjoy them to someone who simply cannot stand them. Like comedians, it's personal taste.

20 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

And the only disturbing thing I can find about 2001 is it's way too ambiguous ending. 

Really? The ending is crystal clear to me. The "star baby" is Bowman-the first human incarnation to be "seeded" onto another planet for the next great civilization to evolve. ("Adam" for religious people) The Apes at the beginning were Earth's "Adam", evolution. Throwing the bone that turns into the spaceship illustrates the passage of time: we know human history from apes to space-why show it? The Monolith was God or all human intellect & spirits, whatever you see it as. That's why we hear the chorale of human voices for the Monolith. You have to feel and intellectually process what you are seeing, it's not told in dialogue like most movies.

I screened the movie for TikiKid when she was about 16 or so and narrated for her some of the more puzzling sequences she may not quite understand, like what the hex is the Monolith? At the end, seeing the Star Baby, she threw her arms in the air & said, "That's the greatest movie I've ever seen!" because it's a fantasy story of why man exists.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/22/2021 at 11:53 AM, Toto said:

I made myself watch the film "A Clockwork Orange" because I read the book for my classic literature book club.  This film is disturbing - especially for me the sexual violence.  I found it a little difficult to sleep after seeing it.  The book is far more violent and graphic.  However, to be repulsed and disturbed by the torture and violence was the point the author (and director Stanley Kubrick) was trying to make.  Kubrick blocked release of the film in Britain fearing it was encouraging acts of violence.  A really controversial film.

The ultra-violence is mostly in the first 30 minutes.   There are many comic moments after that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

TIKI

Been a while since I've seen it, but I seem to recall that "Star Baby" at the end of he movie is approaching Planet Earth, not a new, uninhabited planet....

Unless Clarke was trying to imply it was Bowman who'll cause the RE-INHABITATION of Earth after a future catastrophic event.    I have a friend who firmly believes, since learning of the universe's continuous expansion, that the universe can only expand so far before it starts to contract and then, after it contracts so much as to crush all that exists, will start to expand again and everything will start all over again.  He claims this explains that "deja vu" sensation we all feel occasionally.  :rolleyes:  You know... That the expansion/contraction thing has happened several times already

Sepiatone

  • Like 1
  • Confused 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, nakano said:

i remember very well i was 16 at the time somebody in the UK -i think-killed somebody in the street coming out of the theater, i remember my feelings then when i saw the fillm and  it could disturb vulnerable people the wrong way

I'd say that person who did the killing was disturbed long before ever seeing the movie.

Sepiatone

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

TIKI

Been a while since I've seen it, but I seem to recall that "Star Baby" at the end of he movie is approaching Planet Earth, not a new, uninhabited planet....

Unless Clarke was trying to imply it was Bowman who'll cause the RE-INHABITATION of Earth after a future catastrophic event.    I have a friend who firmly believes, since learning of the universe's continuous expansion, that the universe can only expand so far before it starts to contract and then, after it contracts so much as to crush all that exists, will start to expand again and everything will start all over again.  He claims this explains that "deja vu" sensation we all feel occasionally.  :rolleyes:  You know... That the expansion/contraction thing has happened several times already

Sepiatone

The last chapter of the book has the Star-Child returning to Earth.  Once there, "he put forth his will, and the circling megatons flowered in a silent detonation that brought a brief, false dawn to half the sleeping globe."  

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

 

??   don't like "White Christmas"  ?  What's with you guys?  It's an utterly charming, entertaining,  enjoyable movie.  And you don't even have to be someone who  celebrates  Christmas to like it.

Let me count the ways it's good: 

It's fun and good-natured. It doesn't ask you to take it seriously,  it's shamelessly unrealistic and silly,  like most movie musical plots are.  I don't ask for or even necessarily want seriousness in a musical .  ( ok, lots of exceptions to that...West Side Story,  Cabaret,  even Oklahoma has its dark moments.....but most musicals are fluffy and fun,  and there's nothing wrong with that.)

The 4 leads are likable and talented. Bing and Rosemary are fantastic singers,  Danny can sing and dance and make us laugh,  and Vera-Ellen dances the pants off everyone .   That number near the beginning,   "The Best Things Happen While You're Dancing",  is so delightful to watch, truly good dancing,  great, fun choreography,  and such a catchy, sweet tune.

Which brings me to the main reason "White Christmas" is a wonderful movie:  The music.  all the songs are by the great Irving Berlin,  one of the best songwriters of the 20th century.  And the dances they devise to go with this great music are a perfect match.  Musicals are all about the quality of the music, which in the case of "White Christmas" is first -rate,    followed closely by the cleverness and skill involved in the dance numbers,  ditto for "White Christmas".   Plus, as I said,  it's fun and unabashedly light and frothy.   Truly a "feel good" movie,  I think anyone who doesn't like it probably doesn't like musicals,  period.

Nope, I don't see it that way at all, MissW. I find White Christmas cloyingly sentimental in a calculating way, minus any charm. I don't think Crosby and Kaye have much chemistry (I believe Kaye had been a replacement for Bob Hope). I will admit it's been a while since I last sat through this Christmas turkey so I can't go into specific details about my reasons for finding it so shallow as an entertainment. But the negative impression of the film has always stayed with me.

As for your last statement, it's true I'm not a big fan of musicals but I don't think it's fair to brand WC dislikers that way. At least when I like a musical it's a good one, like Singin' in the Rain and The Band Wagon, as well as some of the Astaire-Rogers films. I enjoyed WC's predecessor, Holiday Inn. Bing is charming in it, with nice chemistry with Astaire and Marjorie Reynolds, and the musical numbers (excluding the uncomfortable one with Bing in blackface) work well for me. WC is just a lazy attempt to duplicate this film's success except it's in Technicolor and has different co-stars for Crosby.

Bing Crosby, by the way, may be a musical icon with a great singing voice and the number one box office star of the '40s. His musicals, however, most made at Paramount, are shallow entertainments (Holiday Inn being my favourite of them) and, for the most part, fail to rank as anything more than time wasters. It was the dancer musical stars like Astaire and Gene Kelly who, it seems to me, appeared in some of the best musicals, even though, I again concede, musicals will never rank among my favourite film genres.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

I'd say that person who did the killing was disturbed long before ever seeing the movie.

Sepiatone

I'am sure you are right,i thought all these years  that he was mad because  they runned  out of popcorn....

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

The last chapter of the book has the Star-Child returning to Earth.  Once there, "he put forth his will, and the circling megatons flowered in a silent detonation that brought a brief, false dawn to half the sleeping globe."  

Doesn't really make anything less ambiguous, eh?  ;) 

Sepiatone

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand that both Clockwork Orange and 2001 were supposed to be disturbing and confusing.  I think they are excellent movies.  Malcolm McDowell gave a stellar performance.  The problem with 2001 is that we saw it on a school field trip and there should have been some sort of follow-up.

Now, a lot of people liked the Baz L. (sp?) version of Moulon (sp?) Rouge - I thought it was terrible.  I think there is a film with the same name with Jose Ferrer (very underrated actor).

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, TomJH said:

Nope, I don't see it that way at all, MissW. I find White Christmas cloyingly sentimental in a calculating way, minus any charm. I don't think Crosby and Kaye have much chemistry (I believe Kaye had been a replacement for Bob Hope). I will admit it's been a while since I last sat through this Christmas turkey so I can't go into specific details about my reasons for finding it so shallow as an entertainment. But the negative impression of the film has always stayed with me.

As for your last statement, it's true I'm not a big fan of musicals but I don't think it's fair to brand WC dislikers that way. At least when I like a musical it's a good one, like Singin' in the Rain and The Band Wagon, as well as some of the Astaire-Rogers films. I enjoyed WC's predecessor, Holiday Inn. Bing is charming in it, with nice chemistry with Astaire and Marjorie Reynolds, and the musical numbers (excluding the uncomfortable one with Bing in blackface) work well for me. WC is just a lazy attempt to duplicate this film's success except it's in Technicolor and has different co-stars for Crosby.

Bing Crosby, by the way, may be a musical icon with a great singing voice and the number one box office star of the '40s. His musicals, however, most made at Paramount, are shallow entertainments (Holiday Inn being my favourite of them) and, for the most part, fail to rank as anything more than time wasters. It was the dancer musical stars like Astaire and Gene Kelly who, it seems to me, appeared in some of the best musicals, even though, I again concede, musicals will never rank among my favourite film genres.

Hmm.  Well, first,  I want to thank you,  Tom,  for explaining so specifically and so articulately just why you don't like White Christmas.   I really appreciate it when someone takes the time and effort,  when talking about a film,  to say WHY  they like or don't like it.  It's easy to just go,  " Oh,  I love The Big Heat "   (which I do, )   or   " I really don't like  Giant "   (which I don't  ) , without bothering to state the reasons why one feels the way one does about the film in question,  whatever it may be   ( obviously I just picked those two at random...)

Second:  As someone who does like musicals,  I should make it clear that I agree with you about Bing Crosby, in that, fine singer though he was,  I don't really care for most of the musicals he was in  - which are legion,  I think.  In fact,  those two, Holiday Inn and White Christmas, are the only two Bing Crosby musicals I actively like ---oh,  and I guess High Society,  if  only for the lovely  song, "True Love".  I agree  that pretty much everything Fred and Gene were in is better than most Bing vehicles.   ( I'm really not enamoured  with all those  "Road" movies.)

Third:   ( sorry, I didn't really intend  to start counting down my reply to you like this)  :  Ok, you can say W.C.  is a bit fromage -y, if you must,  and ok,  yes, it does have maybe overwhelmingly slick production values.  But !   I still maintain it's got great  music,  exceptionally good songs,  thanks to Irving Berlin   ( and there are several in W.C.  that aren't in Holiday Inn )  and really lively, fun, dance numbers.  And when all's said and done,  for me, if a musical's got outstanding music and dance numbers,  I'm all over it, baby.   

Oh, and fourth:   Full disclosure:  I first saw White Christmas  as a kid.  (  see my above post about all that - actually, I know you have.) 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

A Clockwork Orange - yeah, I don't get the appeal.  As a matter of fact, I can't recall even getting to the ending of this film.  Speaking of Kubrick films, I did enjoy seeing Nicole Kidman in her undies, but aside from that,  Eyes Wide Shut bored the heck out of me.

Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

 ( I'm really not enamoured  with all those  "Road" movies.)

 

Oh, and fourth:   Full disclosure:  I first saw White Christmas  as a kid.  (  see my above post about all that - actually, I know you have.) 

 

Ahhh, childhood nostalgia, it plays a huge role with many of my favourite films, too, MissW. So if you first saw WC then, well, then I understand how that can colour your feelings in favour of this musical.

Which brings me to the Road films, which you say you don't care for. As it so happens I first saw most of them when I was young. Therefore my feelings towards what I consider to be the best of them (primarily those made during the war years) are very favourable. I love the chemistry between Bing and Bob, I love their breaking the "fourth wall" when they talk directly to the audience and the various "inside" jokes, I enjoy the often zany humour, I even like some of the talking animals that address the camera (thankfully there weren't that many of them). Hope was fast and funny with great timing in those days, particularly if he had good material, and Crosby was at the peak of his laid back charm and was almost as funny, I feel, as Bob. Yes, I can wax quite nostalgically over these films.

Road to Zanzibar [1941] | Classic movies, Comedy movies, Television show

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure.  I've always liked that "snappy come back" and forth dialog between Hope and Crosby.  And sometimes too, the self deprecation from the two.   In one small way maybe.....

In one(forget which) Bing is telling the typically sarong clad Dorothy Lamour  that he's anxious to get back to the States, "I'd like to see how the Pirates are doing..." ( some recall at the time, Crosby was part owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates baseball team).  Lamour replied in a surprised voice, "You have pirates in America?"  "Oh, yeah, "  says Bing, "But they aren't anything to be afraid of"  obviously knowing the audience is aware that ball team was(at the time) and spent many seasons in the cellar.  :D 

And in another (Morocco I think)  Hope, seeing some guys rolling cigarettes at a table as he and Crosby try to sneak out of some evil sheikh's compound, remarks,  "What are these guys rollin',...REEFERS?"  ;) 

Took ME by surprise at the time.

Sepiatone

Link to post
Share on other sites

I hate West Side Story with the heat of a thousand suns. The songs, the Romeo & Juliet ripoff, the bratty teenagers...ugh.

I detest Christmas in Connecticut.  I can't say exactly why as it is a top drawer production.  Stanwyck is among my top 5 favorites so I should like it at least a little bit for this reason alone, but I don't. 

Jezebel - see above.

Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolf - The screaming and histrionics  are enough to make my ears bleed.

Not crazy about most Marlene Dietrich movies, especially the ones she made with Josef von Sternberg. However, I do respect her as a Hollywood icon and wish I liked her more.

Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, LoyFan said:

Not crazy about most Marlene Dietrich movies, especially the ones she made with Josef von Sternberg. However, I do respect her as a Hollywood icon and wish I liked her more.

Not even Shanghai Express? Man, I love that film.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...