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Popular movies that you hate


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1 hour ago, Mr. Gorman said:

There's a couple of other juicy words you can use besides "hate". 

There's "loathe" and "despise".   👍

 

Or even "Detest" and "Abhor".  ;) 

Sepiatone

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On 9/27/2021 at 11:02 AM, Mr. Gorman said:

@FXREYMAN:  Greetings.  → Why not offer up a few nuggets of why some of the movies on your list are not enjoyable viewing?  Doesn't have to be an expansive list of complaints; could be something as simple as "This movie runs so long I lose interest and get bored" or "the subject matter doesn't interest me in the least". 

That's why I don't fancy LAWRENCE OF ARABIA:  It's so long + the desert doesn't interest me enough to watch a 3½-hour movie.  If it were 100 minutes I'd give it a go.  Like the 1965 movie SANDS OF THE KALAHARI seems interesting enough, but it doesn't run 215 minutes either so I'd be willing to watch that should it pop up on TCM (or maybe it already has and I've just missed it). 

Here it goes...

The Godfather. I am not a fan of Marlon Brando. There. I said it!!!

Many believe he was our greatest actor. I never felt that way. And if I have to see another clip of him yelling “Stella!” from A Streetcar Named Desire, I think I am going to puke. They could have told the film in a much less violent way. I understand that filmmaking in the early 1970’s seemed to be going the way of showcasing lots and lots of violence, but I am sure that they could have been able to show less and the story could have been better. From my understanding it was the studio which wanted a more violent visual style. Coppola wanted a more talky, drama-laden version.

The Godfather, Part II. Not too bad, just don’t like De Niro all that much. Pacino is fine, but ultimately I am not a fan of the intercutting between the two time periods.

 

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22 minutes ago, fxreyman said:

Here it goes...

The Godfather. I am not a fan of Marlon Brando. There. I said it!!!

Many believe he was our greatest actor. I never felt that way. And if I have to see another clip of him yelling “Stella!” from A Streetcar Named Desire, I think I am going to puke. They could have told the film in a much less violent way. I understand that filmmaking in the early 1970’s seemed to be going the way of showcasing lots and lots of violence, but I am sure that they could have been able to show less and the story could have been better. From my understanding it was the studio which wanted a more violent visual style. Coppola wanted a more talky, drama-laden version.

The Godfather, Part II. Not too bad, just don’t like De Niro all that much. Pacino is fine, but ultimately I am not a fan of the intercutting between the two time periods.

 

Hmmmmm.....

Prefer "sugar coating" violence, eh?  Dislike that honest approach to it, eh?

Perhaps THIS is one gangster flick that won't upset your poor, widdle sensibilities?  ;) 

Sepiatone

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5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Thanks Bronxgirl & Dan. Your posts are perfect examples of how debate should work. I enjoy several of the movies Bronxie dislikes, but completely understand her reasoning...because she takes the time to explain, even if just a sentence or two. And knowing these films, I can see why she feels that way.

I don't, but that's OK. That's what makes movies (& any art) fun-they touch you or they don't.

That said, I was taught never to use the word "hate" either-"dislike" was the strongest I could say.  Same for (Philadelphia Story) couldn't say "stink" but "smell" was acceptable.

If your parents were coaching you on smell versus stink and dislike versus hate, you must have been a dream kid. I was just happy to get my kids out of the F bomb factory. Never got to subtleties. 

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1 hour ago, fxreyman said:

Here it goes...

The Godfather. I am not a fan of Marlon Brando. There. I said it!!!

Many believe he was our greatest actor. I never felt that way. And if I have to see another clip of him yelling “Stella!” from A Streetcar Named Desire, I think I am going to puke. They could have told the film in a much less violent way. I understand that filmmaking in the early 1970’s seemed to be going the way of showcasing lots and lots of violence, but I am sure that they could have been able to show less and the story could have been better. From my understanding it was the studio which wanted a more violent visual style. Coppola wanted a more talky, drama-laden version.

The Godfather, Part II. Not too bad, just don’t like De Niro all that much. Pacino is fine, but ultimately I am not a fan of the intercutting between the two time periods.

 

I know what you mean. I saw the godfather at the drive in as a grade schooler and the violence was a whole new world. Now it's almost cartoonish. Back then when I saw Moe Greene get it, I was dumbstruck. Now I'm all, "Oh please. What. Ever."

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49 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Hmmmmm.....

Prefer "sugar coating" violence, eh?  Dislike that honest approach to it, eh?

Perhaps THIS is one gangster flick that won't upset your poor, widdle sensibilities?  ;) 

Sepiatone

Well, I would not go that far...

But a good story told well, even with some violence can be tolerated. One example I would give is The Untouchables. Yes, a violent film, but not mean spirited as I thought the Godfather movies were.

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On 9/30/2021 at 1:02 AM, TomJH said:

Blow Up (1966)

What the . . .

The last time I was this confused was when I had to take a calculus test without the assistance of the class math genius, a friend, having completed the test and leaving his answers on full display on his desk beside me.

Tom,  I'm not surprised that you don't like Blow Up. I'm guessing that the majority of people who've seen it hate it.

The first time I saw it,  I thought it was so confusing and also pretentious,  it made me angry.   However,  I saw it a couple of times after that,  and came to, if not love it,   at least appreciate it.  This is probably mainly because it was on a film course I took,  and the prof was helpful in illuminating some of the more arcane aspects of the movie.

Anyway,  shirley you at least enjoy -- or don't mind ? -- the scene with the Yardbirds playing  "Train Kept A'Rollin'  ",  it's kind of fun.  Of course it was really Pete Townsend who was prone to smashing his guitar,  not Jeff Beck,   but I guess Antonioni  couldn't get The Who.

Interesting comparison to a complex calculus problem;   any kind of math beyond simple arithmetic is like a foreign language to me.

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4 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Tom,  I'm not surprised that you don't like Blow Up. I'm guessing that the majority of people who've seen it hate it.

The first time I saw it,  I thought it was so confusing and also pretentious,  it made me angry.   However,  I saw it a couple of times after that,  and came to, if not love it,   at least appreciate it.  This is probably mainly because it was on a film course I took,  and the prof was helpful in illuminating some of the more arcane aspects of the movie.

Anyway,  shirley you at least enjoy -- or don't mind ? -- the scene with the Yardbirds playing  "Train Kept A'Rollin'  ",  it's kind of fun.  Of course it was really Pete Townsend who was prone to smashing his guitar,  not Jeff Beck,   but I guess Antonioni  couldn't get The Who.

Interesting comparison to a complex calculus problem;   any kind of math beyond simple arithmetic is like a foreign language to me.

I remember going to the show to see Jacob's Ladder with a friend. After the movie had ended, with its highly ambiguous ending, there was silence in the theatre until my friend had a sudden outburst, "I hate movies that make me feel brain dead."

Her feelings about that film's ending pretty well sums up my feelings about Blow Up.

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Yes, Jacob's Ladder was confusing,  to say the least.  And also a "downer".

But, back to Blow Up for a second...you didn't make any comment on the Yardbirds'  scene.  Not a fan of swinging '60s pop bands ? 

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10 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Yes, Jacob's Ladder was confusing,  to say the least.  And also a "downer".

But, back to Blow Up for a second...you didn't make any comment on the Yardbirds'  scene.  Not a fan of swinging '60s pop bands ? 

Sorry, I don't recall the scene. I suspect '60s pop bands stay with you more than they do with me,

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On 9/30/2021 at 4:27 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

I'll use the word "dislike" for:

DR. ZHIVAGO    As someone who appreciates David Lean, this is a big disappointment for me.  There are two fine performances from Rod Steiger and Tom Courtenay.  Otherwise, I much prefer (and highly recommend) 1937's KNIGHT WITHOUT ARMOR if one wants picturesque adventures and love amidst the turmoil of the Russian Revolution.  Robert Donat and Marlene Dietrich are wonderful as the two star-crossed lovers.   And that ending!  Talk about romantic!  Sigh....

BONNIE AND CLYDE   I understand it's American "New Wave" but hell, just take out everything and leave Foggy Mountain Breakdown, lol.  Yes, I "get" all the so-called intellectual allusions but just don't care!

MODERN TIMES    I know -- heresy!  But for cripes sake Charlie, you and Paulette are in a department store.  Can't she at least swipe a pair of shoes?  Apparently Ms. Goddard must remain barefoot and cheek-smudged throughout.  Chaplin just loves the concept of a Victorian waif.   Gets on my nerves and ruins whatever "genius" ideas, visual or otherwise, the comedian is trying to impart.  (by the way, Paulette is also cheek-smudged in THE GREAT DICTATOR)

WHITE CHRISTMAS    Flat and uninspired.  A little of Danny Kaye goes a long way.  HOLIDAY INN is the one to watch as it has cozy charm plus Fred Astaire who is teamed with Bing, which for me is  much more timeless, classic and satisfying pairing.

 

 

On 9/30/2021 at 4:39 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

The torches of the villagers are coming for me, I just know it:

SINGING IN THE RAIN     Donald O'Connor is wonderful.   Otherwise....

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS   Gene Kelly singing and dancing in French with the kids, no thank you.  Gene Kelly's "artistic" touches, no thank you.  Always gets too big for his britches.  Much prefer him in ON THE TOWN (one of my favorite musicals but even there Kelly can't resist adding that superfluous, pretentious ballet sequence)

 

 

On 9/30/2021 at 5:00 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

VERTIGO    I've said it before and will say it again -- it feels like Jimmy Stewart is riding around San Francisco for the entire length of this movie looking for a woman he first glanced at for about two seconds at a restaurant, and that was enough time, apparently, to set Scottie off on his obsessive, baffling, stupid quest.   Not one of Hitch's best in my opinion although of course others wildly disagree.

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD    Again, heresy!  I think Peck's finest performance is in THE YEARLING.  He should have gotten the Oscar for that.   Never fails to move me, whereas I feel manipulated by MOCKINGBIRD.    

Oh,  Bronxie,  your posts are so much fun,  I never care whether I agree with you or not,  I just enjoy reading your opinions and the way you express them.

I'll just  "discuss" some  of your selections a little bit.  Couldn't agree with you more about Doctor Zhivago,  in fact it was the very first movie I posted about here,  I think back on page 1.  And I also don't like Bonnie and Clyde,  I just don't understand what all the fuss is about.  If we're going to see a tale unfold about young law-breaking lovers on the run,  I'd much rather go with Gun Crazy.   I think part of my problem with B and C is,  I don't  much like Warren Beatty,  again,  I don't get why he's considered so sexy and all .  

I love Modern Times,  but I can see someone finding the Paulette Godard character annoying,  sooty cheeked and smirking.  But I'm a sucker for just about all Chaplin's films,  especially the silents  ( which are most of them.  )  I know a lot of people think his films are sentimental, but they work for me.

White Christmas I've already discussed at length here,  but I'll just add,  I like both White Christmas and its predecessor.  They're both fun.  I don't think they're as similar as everyone says they are,  ok,  yeah,  there's a plot similarity,  and some of the musical numbers are the same,  but they're different enough  that I don't see W.C  as an irritating schmaltzy re-make of Holiday Inn,  which seems to be the main complaint people have against the later film.

Vertigo is one of those movies that works best the first time you see it.  It's so unexpected and full of surprises,   fortunately for me,  the very first time I saw it I had no idea there was a "twist" coming  , and was duly  shocked  when it came.  But  I can see someone,  on subsequent viewings,  thinking it's a bit over-the-top.  Still,  I like the film,  I just need to make sure I don't watch it too often,  or it will lose that mysterious magical quality it has.   Love the soundtrack,  by the way.

Although I don't hate To Kill a Mockingbird,  in fact I kind of like it, it doesn't hold a place in my own personal pantheon of "great movies".   

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On 9/30/2021 at 12:02 AM, TomJH said:

Blow Up (1966)

What the . . .

The last time I was this confused was when I had to take a calculus test without the assistance of the class math genius, a friend, having completed the test and leaving his answers on full display on his desk beside me.

I can't think of Antonioni's "Blow Up" without thinking of Austin Power's brilliant lampoon.  I think that there aren't concrete explanations for events in the film but that was the whole idea.  I liked the movie better after I read about it's theme that related to tenets of existentialist philosophy but seeing it the first time it was totally bewildering and I will never make sense of the weird ending with the mimes in the park.  I did like seeing the Yardbirds though.

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2 hours ago, Toto said:

I can't think of Antonioni's "Blow Up" without thinking of Austin Power's brilliant lampoon.  I think that there aren't concrete explanations for events in the film but that was the whole idea.  I liked the movie better after I read about it's theme that related to tenets of existentialist philosophy but seeing it the first time it was totally bewildering and I will never make sense of the weird ending with the mimes in the park.  I did like seeing the Yardbirds though.

C'mon now, Toto. The explanation to this is very very simple.

Uh-huh. Antonioni is pretty much saying that it's a hell of a lot easier playing tennis with an IMAGINARY ball than it is with a REAL one!

Topspin lobs and overhead slams especially.

(...take it from the avid tennis player here)  ;)

LOL

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12 hours ago, Dargo said:

C'mon now, Toto. The explanation to this is very very simple.

Uh-huh. Antonioni is pretty much saying that it's a hell of a lot easier playing tennis with an IMAGINARY ball than it is with a REAL one!

Topspin lobs and overhead slams especially.

(...take it from the avid tennis player here)  ;)

LOL

I recall the time I was playing tennis at a high school when a group of smart alecky teens decided to walk directly across the courts, interrupting our game in the process. Now this put me in an antagonistic mood, I suppose, because I responded by firing a serve as hard as I could into the middle of the crowd. I caught one teen boy right in the ear with the ball. He didn't make a sound but continued walking with his buddies shaking head while rubbing his ear and, I'm sure, a little less cocky than he had been a moment before. It was the best tennis ball I hit all day.

My point is that this was the best blow up moment in a tennis game I have seen (well, excluding a few with John McEnroe or Illie Nastate in them, of course).

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7 hours ago, TomJH said:

I caught one teen boy right in the ear with the ball.

That's how my brother went deaf in one ear, after our oldest brother threw a basketball at his head. The only good part of the story was my brother stopped screaming & crying watching Mom hitting Marc with a broom & yelling, "Why do you have to be so violent!?" 

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

That's how my brother went deaf in one ear, after our oldest brother threw a basketball at his head. The only good part of the story was my brother stopped screaming & crying watching Mom hitting Marc with a broom & yelling, "Why do you have to be so violent!?" 

Sorry, TikiSoo, the teen had it coming (the ball, that is). Maybe he learned a lesson about deliberately walking onto someone's tennis court when they're playing a game.

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Jaws.  Simply don't get it.

Forrest Gump.  Stupid guy in an equally stupid movie.

Lawrence of (yawn) Arabia

Encounters of the Third Kind.

And perhaps it goes without saying, but...

Any and all Batman movies.

Any and all "superhero" movies of any sort.

Any and all hyperviolent movies.

TikiSoo.  I disagree on Blandings.  Perhaps it's the fact that I own an older house and can relate to the ongoing issues.  Certainly not Myrna's best, but the "paint color" scene is a classic!

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21 hours ago, fxreyman said:

Well, I would not go that far...

But a good story told well, even with some violence can be tolerated. One example I would give is The Untouchables. Yes, a violent film, but not mean spirited as I thought the Godfather movies were.

Odd....

I've heard several people who also disliked THE GOTHFATHER give a variety of reasons why, but never knew anybody who felt it(and the sequel) was"mean spirited".

18 hours ago, danmc757 said:

Everyone seems to like Ferris Bueller's Day Off.  Cannot stand it!!!  

Yeah, I thought it was OK, but not "great".  Some day I might be in a mood to watch it a second time.  Not high on my list either.  I too don't understand the "cult" status.

Sepiatone

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I don't get all those Marvel Comic Book movies.

There are some movies I just don't care to watch:  Rambo and Rocky (and all their sequels).

Dances to Wolves danced with Kevin Costner's ego.

Any and all Zombie movies (except early ones where they weren't flesh eating).

I don't hate but I think many movie musicals based on Broadway musicals aren't great.  Case in point:  Fiddler on the Roof and My Fair Lady.

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18 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

 

 

Oh,  Bronxie,  your posts are so much fun,  I never care whether I agree with you or not,  I just enjoy reading your opinions and the way you express them.

I'll just  "discuss" some  of your selections a little bit.  Couldn't agree with you more about Doctor Zhivago,  in fact it was the very first movie I posted about here,  I think back on page 1.  And I also don't like Bonnie and Clyde,  I just don't understand what all the fuss is about.  If we're going to see a tale unfold about young law-breaking lovers on the run,  I'd much rather go with Gun Crazy.   I think part of my problem with B and C is,  I don't  much like Warren Beatty,  again,  I don't get why he's considered so sexy and all .  

I love Modern Times,  but I can see someone finding the Paulette Godard character annoying,  sooty cheeked and smirking.  But I'm a sucker for just about all Chaplin's films,  especially the silents  ( which are most of them.  )  I know a lot of people think his films are sentimental, but they work for me.

White Christmas I've already discussed at length here,  but I'll just add,  I like both White Christmas and its predecessor.  They're both fun.  I don't think they're as similar as everyone says they are,  ok,  yeah,  there's a plot similarity,  and some of the musical numbers are the same,  but they're different enough  that I don't see W.C  as an irritating schmaltzy re-make of Holiday Inn,  which seems to be the main complaint people have against the later film.

Vertigo is one of those movies that works best the first time you see it.  It's so unexpected and full of surprises,   fortunately for me,  the very first time I saw it I had no idea there was a "twist" coming  , and was duly  shocked  when it came.  But  I can see someone,  on subsequent viewings,  thinking it's a bit over-the-top.  Still,  I like the film,  I just need to make sure I don't watch it too often,  or it will lose that mysterious magical quality it has.   Love the soundtrack,  by the way.

Although I don't hate To Kill a Mockingbird,  in fact I kind of like it, it doesn't hold a place in my own personal pantheon of "great movies".   

Miss W., wow, thanks.  I saw your page one ZHIVAGO comments.  I'm more disposed towards the pre-epic Lean.  (SUMMERTIME being a particular favorite as well as the Dickens adaptions)

Chaplin of course heads the pantheon of great silent comedians (and along with him, Keaton and Lloyd, I'd add Fatty Arbuckle, who imo has been somewhat underrated)  Charlie's shorts are more my so-called style I guess -- less "important" but for me funnier.   I like The Tramp's early prickly persona as opposed to the more popular, tug-at-your-heartstrings one.

I too have problems with Warren Beatty.  Can never tell if he's being masterfully subtle or just a natural bore.   There are certain moments however, in ALL FALL DOWN and SPLENDOR IN THE GRASS where I feel he's reaching for something authentic.

For better or worse I can never separate WHITE CHRISTMAS from HOLIDAY INN.   But this upcoming season I'll give it another go.   (or try to!)

Can't imagine VERTIGO w/o Bernard Herrmann.  The first time I saw this film I was like "What the heck??" and continue to watch every time it's on, trying to figure it all out, what did I miss, etc.  So for me I need more viewings, not less.  Not that I feel forced to love or even understand the plot, character motivations and the like, mind you.

I think maybe people confuse the important themes in TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD as a reason to lavish praise on its overall quality as a film.   There is, though, one truly sublime moment, and that's Scout's "Hey, Boo".  I don't feel manipulated in that scene but am really touched, even to the point of tears.  Yes!

I'm always drawn, though, to the unpopular stuff.  And that usually means a genre film in the horror/sci-fi/mystery category.   ROBOT MONSTER is a favorite.   

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