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Nice picture of Eddie Albert.  He was such a great guy ... war hero, terrific actor, loyal family man, lovely person.  I've always felt his son Edward Albert was a hero too, giving up his career to take care of his dad in his last years, and then sadly dying himself not long afterward.  RIP to them both.

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Birthday boy Eddie Albert surrounded by his wife Margo, son Edward and daughter Maria

Eddie Albert angered Jack Warner because of a personal indiscretion resulting in the termination of his contract with Warner's studio.

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Eddie Albert angered Jack Warner because of a personal indiscretion resulting in the termination of his contract with Warner's studio.

 

I guess bedding your bosses wife could be called a "personal indiscretion"..

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I guess bedding your bosses wife could be called a "personal indiscretion"..

 

Thanks for filling in the blanks about what the indiscretion was.   From a legal POV I assume WB terminated the contract based on the moral clause but I wonder if that would hold up in court if the actor under contract wasn't married (which doesn't apply here but I just have a general interested in how those moral clauses could be used to take actual legal action).

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I guess bedding your bosses wife could be called a "personal indiscretion"..

That's right. Even before he won the Bronze Star during the war, Albert had already demonstrated his daring and courage. ;)

 

Actually, I have since read that an enraged JL actually kept Albert under contract after making the discovery but refused to give him work or loan him out to others, determined to destroy his career. It was at this time that Albert enlisted in the military. I don't know any specifics beyond that except that Albert's first film after the war, Strange Voyage, was distributed by Monogram, and his film after that was for Republic.

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It should be noted that Eddie's affair with Ann Warner was in 1941, years before he was married.  He and Margo were married in 1945 and remained married until her death 20 years later.

 

 

"Warner made no pretense of faithfulness to his wife, Ann, and kept a series of mistresses throughout the 1950s and 1960s. The most enduring of these "girlfriends" was an aspiring actress named Jackie Park, who bore a "startling" resemblance to Warner's second wife. The relationship was in its fourth year when Ann Warner pressed her husband to terminate the affair. Although Ann did once have an affair with studio actor Eddie Albert in 1941, she was much more devoted to the marriage by contrast."   (Wikipedia)

 

Pictures of Ann Warner, incidentally, show her as good-looking and chic as any of the stars in her husband's company.

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Pictures of Ann Warner, incidentally, show her as good-looking and chic as any of the stars in her husband's company.

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That's Ann Warner on the left. As you can see, she is certainly not dwarfed in beauty by either Lili Damita or Marlene Dietrich at the same table. That's her husband laughing in the background with Errol Flynn.

 

JL was said to be afraid of his wife. Why I'm not quite certain, but, despite his amours outside the marriage, as well as her's (though I believe that Eddie Albert may have been the only time for her), they remained married until his death in 1978.

 

It was Ann Warner, by the way, to whom Olivia de Havilland turned when JL initially refused to loan her to Selznick for Gone with the Wind. After being pressured by his wife, Jack gave in, allowing Olivia to play Melanie. But he never forgave de Havilland for her action, and Jack Warner could be a very vindictive man.

 

Hope you don't mind my posting this photo on your thread, Joe.

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4dc17474-5e88-4f15-8f93-bd93bed1caa6_zps

 

That's Ann Warner on the left. As you can see, she is certainly not dwarfed in beauty by either Lili Damita or Marlene Dietrich at the same table. That's her husband laughing in the background with Errol Flynn.

 

JL was said to be afraid of his wife. Why I'm not quite certain, but, despite his amours outside the marriage, as well as her's (though I believe that Eddie Albert may have been the only time for her), they remained married until his death in 1978.

 

It was Ann Warner, by the way, to whom Olivia de Havilland turned when JL initially refused to loan her to Selznick for Gone with the Wind. After being pressured by his wife, Jack gave in, allowing Olivia to play Melanie. But he never forgave de Havilland for her action, and Jack Warner could be a very vindictive man.

 

Hope you don't mind my posting this photo on your thread, Joe.

 

Tom,  what about Dothery's post where she say: 

 

"It should be noted that Eddie's affair with Ann Warner was in 1941, years before he was married.  He and Margo were married in 1945 and remained married until her death 20 years later".

 

If Ann wasn't married yet to Jack she didn't have an affair with Eddie outside their marriage.

 

So folks what is the actual truth there?

 

Anyhow,  I have always had a place in my heart for Ann for the help she provided Olivia. 

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Tom,  what about Dothery's post where she say: 

 

"It should be noted that Eddie's affair with Ann Warner was in 1941, years before he was married.  He and Margo were married in 1945 and remained married until her death 20 years later".

 

If Ann wasn't married yet to Jack she didn't have an affair with Eddie outside their marriage.

 

So folks what is the actual truth there?

 

Anyhow,  I have always had a place in my heart for Ann for the help she provided Olivia. 

James, Dothery is saying 1941 was years before Eddie Albert's 1945 marriage.

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