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79b40de6-29c0-4d91-85df-c9efbbe1c83d_zps

Here's birthday boy Herbert Marshall, in one of his last stands as a thoroughly dashing romantic lead, about to bound up a semi-circular flight of stairs in Ernst Lubitsch's sublime 1932 romantic comedy Trouble in Paradise. He bounds up these stairs more than once in the film; his bounding becomes a sort of running gag, and whenever I watch the film I can't watch Marshall doing it without remembering that he was doing it with only one real leg; he had lost most of his right one in World War I. (And I should state right here that I know that some might point out that Marshall went on to play quite a few more romantic leads in his career, He was quite a guy.

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I remember Herbert Marshall playing in "The Letter" twice; once with Jeanne Eagels, when he played the lover she killed, and once with Bette Davis, when he played the husband she lied to until the end.  I liked the Jeanne Eagels version better, to tell the truth.  Also his part in it was infinitely more powerful.  He was so cruel and scornful of her I wouldn't have been loath to shoot him myself.

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79b40de6-29c0-4d91-85df-c9efbbe1c83d_zps

Here's birthday boy Herbert Marshall, in one of his last stands as a thoroughly dashing romantic lead, about to bound up a semi-circular flight of stairs in Ernst Lubitsch's sublime 1932 romantic comedy Trouble in Paradise. He bounds up these stairs more than once in the film; his bounding becomes a sort of running gag, and whenever I watch the film I can't watch Marshall doing it without remembering that he was doing it with only one real leg; he had lost most of his right one in World War I. (And I should state right here that I know that some might point out that Marshall went on to play quite a few more romantic leads in his career, He was quite a guy.

I love your photographs and really appreciate you sharing them with us.  Thank you so much.  Regarding Herbert Marshall in TROUBLE IN PARADISE, I think they must have used a stunt double for those sequences on the stairs.  But, yes, he was quite a guy who had a long, great career in silents and sound (wonderful voice).

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English actor Rex Harrison with his second wife, birthday gal Lilli Palmer and their three-year-old son Carey, perusing a book of Van Gogh paintings, circa 1947. Carey grew up to become a successful playwright and novelist.

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Read a little story about Clayton Moore when he was doing a personal appearance at an auto dealership.  The day had drawn on and the customers for autographs and pictures had dwindled, and Moore and the dealership guys were getting ready to head back to his hotel and drop him off.  He had the whole regalia on (except the mask; he couldn't use that because of contractual problems, so he used sunglasses instead).  They got in the car and headed out, with Moore a little the worse for a drink or two back at the lot.  On the way they got into a fender-bender with another car and the dealership guys got out to see how bad it was.  The guy in the other car was nasty and very aggressive.  They objected to his version of the accident and he said, "Well, it's your word against mine; who's going to believe you?"  And Moore got out of the car with the hat and the sunglasses and said, "Well, I think they'll believe ME, pardner!"

 

A friend of mine was a big fan of Moore's, and when he was inducted into the Cowboy Hall of Fame, he sent him a gift.  It was a trophy he'd had made here in Hawaii.  He called me to talk about what to have inscribed on it.  First he told me about it.  His grandmother had left him an old Victrola, one of the big ones with a lid.  It had records in a case below which were about half an inch thick.  One of them was the "William Tell Overture."  My friend Mike had a shadow box made at the local trophy store and had the record mounted in it.  The kicker was what he used for the spindle:  a silver bullet.  He got it done at the local jewelry store.  I told him to go find the intro to the Lone Ranger radio show and use something from that for his inscription.  He called back a while later to say he'd been to the local video store and found the intro.  He said, "Here it is:  'To Clayton Moore, with gratitude for the many times you took me back to those thrilling days of yesteryear.'"  He sent it off to the theater where the presentations were to be made, together with a gift for the lady in charge of coordinating everything (Mike's no fool), and she saw to it that Moore got it.  A few years later he met Moore at a party and told him who he was, and Moore said how much he loved that thing.  He said he'd hung it in his hallway and passed it every morning on the way to breakfast.  Mike always knew the right thing to do.

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