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Connery is handsome, rich, a fine actor and a wife beater who defends his right to hit women "when they deserve it."  Twice, on Babara Walters interviews, he's said it, straight out.  He talked about doing it "with an open hand," but his first wife Diane Cilento says he beat her with his fists.  I have no respect whatever for men who think like this.

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Connery is handsome, rich, a fine actor and a wife beater who defends his right to hit women "when they deserve it."  Twice, on Babara Walters interviews, he's said it, straight out.  He talked about doing it "with an open hand," but his first wife Diane Cilento says he beat her with his fists.  I have no respect whatever for men who think like this.

I think I remember Connery also talked about hitting women who deserve it on Johnny Carson. He is very handsome, a great actor and was the best 007, Goldfinger is my favorite of the bunch, however I have to agree. I lost so much respect for him and he's a very screwed up man.

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Thank you, SCSU75. It looks like I was duped again. Can't seem to find a picture of actress Vera Miles as she looks today. HELP!

 

I can certainly see why you might have been "duped" here, Joe, as to my eyes that British lady there looks very much as what I would image the American actress might look like today.

 

(...and btw, I tried to find a recent picture of the actress just now myself, but I didn't see any on the internet either)

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Thalia Menninger!  That perfect siren!  Tuesday was good, but in "Bring Me The Head of Dobie Gillis," the movie, Connie Stevens and her daughter Tricia Leigh Fisher stole every scene they were in.  I've missed seeing Tricia ever since; she just didn't do much after that.  Shame.  But Tuesday disappeared as well, at least from my radar.

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Thalia Menninger!  That perfect siren!  Tuesday was good, but in "Bring Me The Head of Dobie Gillis," the movie, Connie Stevens and her daughter Tricia Leigh Fisher stole every scene they were in.  I've missed seeing Tricia ever since; she just didn't do much after that.  Shame.  But Tuesday disappeared as well, at least from my radar.

Did you notice that Bring Me the Head of Dobie Gillis is basically a filmed version of Durrenmatt's The Visit? The play was also filmed with Ingrid Bergman and Anthony Quinn. A musical version was recently on Broadway, with Chita Rivera.

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Birthday boy Charles Boyer and the love of his life, his wife Pat.
It was the classic opposites attract situation, apparently. He was the rising star with a liquid French accent and brooding eyes; she a tiny, piquant B-Movie actress.
They met at one of the reserved Boyer's rare appearances at a Hollywood party in the early 1930s, and married a few weeks later in 1934.
Boyer and Paterson's relationship was a happy, functioning marriage until a true tragedy struck them in 1965. Their son Michael, who apparently inherited the volatile passionate streak that Boyer projected on camera, took his own life in a game of Russian Roulette after his fiancee left him. The death of their only child predictably shook the heartbroken parents, and though their love for each other never waned as sadly often happens in relationships where children are lost, they never again had that easygoing gaiety that made their marriage so delightful.
Then in the late '70s Pat became terminally ill with cancer. Boyer acted the chivalrous cavalier up to the end. He told her doctor never to let her know how seriously she was ill, and never let on himself, joking with her and pampering her on her deathbed. When she passed away in 1978, he quietly and calmly saw to the details of her funeral, contacting the necessary people, all the while genial and collected.
Then two days later he killed himself, overdosing on barbituates. So sad.

 
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Did you notice that Bring Me the Head of Dobie Gillis is basically a filmed version of Durrenmatt's The Visit? The play was also filmed with Ingrid Bergman and Anthony Quinn. A musical version was recently on Broadway, with Chita Rivera.

 

I saw the Bergman movie.  It was a lot more solemn than the Dobie Gillis piece, however!  The premise was excellent.  Nobody wanted to help Dobie ... a bit of "High Noon" in there, too.

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY

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INGRID BERGMAN  (1915 - 1982)

 

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JACKIE 'BUTCH' JENKINS  (1937 - 2001)

 

Butch left films at the age of eleven when he developed a nervous stutter which never left him, even as an adult.
His childhood earnings were well invested for him, leaving him independently wealthy while still in his 30s.
In 1970: "I have never regretted leaving the picture business and am very grateful to my mother for taking me away from it. I enjoyed the first few years of acting in movies but I certainly don't miss it. In fact, when I've had offers to return a few times, I wasn't even tempted. There may be a better way to live than on a lake with a couple of cows, a wife, and children but being a movie star is not one." He died in his sleep at age 63.

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Years ago I met Joyce Reynolds, who lived here on the Big Island of Hawaii, and typed a screenplay for her.  She told me that she and Joan Fontaine had loved Charles Boyer so much when they made "The Constant Nymph" that they used to wait for him to come in every morning and would greet him joyfully, to spend as much time with him as they could.  Apparently he was a delightful man, both to know personally and to work with.  R.I.P.

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Years ago I met Joyce Reynolds, who lived here on the Big Island of Hawaii, and typed a screenplay for her.  She told me that she and Joan Fontaine had loved Charles Boyer so much when they made "The Constant Nymph" that they used to wait for him to come in every morning and would greet him joyfully, to spend as much time with him as they could. 

 

Joyce Reynolds and Joan Fontaine

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