Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

Isn't that Ethel/Mitzi/Lucy photo from Ethel's wedding to Ernest Borgnine which lasted only a month and neither would write or talk about afterwards?  The papers reported she wore yellow and she's wearing a veiled headpiece.  While Mitzi and Lucy are smiling she looks a bit perturbed; trouble already?   

I think it must be.  I just googled "Ethel Merman Ernest Borgnine" and it brought up a bunch of pictures of the wedding, because really, that's pretty much all there was to that marriage and Ethel is wearing the same dress and veil.

 

In Ethel's memoirs, she dedicated a chapter to her marriage with Ernest Borgnine.  It consisted of one blank page. 

 

I'd be curious to know why they married in the first place.  If they had dated for awhile and were getting along well enough to want to be married, I wonder what happened that it only lasted 1 day.  The way that the wedding pictures look, it doesn't look like this was an impetuous decision.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I always loved Otto Kruger.  When I was young I fantasized that the guy I married would look like him in his old age.  Handsome to the end.  (Actually, that happened.  My husband wasn't just handsome ... when he was dying one of the nurses came into the room, looked at him sleeping, and said, "Isn't he beautiful?"  And he was.)  Anyway, Kruger was superb in everything he did.  He always seemed to me to be a very natural actor, who "was" the character much more than others like him.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Dothery:  I'm in your corner.  Mr. Kruger was great in everything he did and was a lot handsomer with grey hair than he was with it dark.  I've been kidded a bit on the threads because I've said the same thing about other actors from the classic age and today's Richard Gere but if older is better what's the fuss about? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dothery:  I'm in your corner.  Mr. Kruger was great in everything he did and was a lot handsomer with grey hair than he was with it dark.  I've been kidded a bit on the threads because I've said the same thing about other actors from the classic age and today's Richard Gere but if older is better what's the fuss about? 

 

I always loved the older guys.  When Gary Cooper was playing leading roles when he was a bit older I thought he was more adorable than ever.  I loved Stewart Granger with those white sideburns.  Cary Grant NEVER got old, to me.  A friend told me about the day years ago when he showed up at CBS to see Jeffrey Selznick, who worked there as a kid, and every secretary or receptionist in the building was suddenly in the hallway with errands to do.  Seasoning, I calls it.  Gregory Peck told the story James Mason had told him.  He was walking along the street in Dublin and was stopped by a lady who said, "Excuse me, but wouldn't you be James Mason in his later years?"

Link to post
Share on other sites

9fb682e5-9b3d-48ef-b269-518af321a70d_zps

Photograph of John F. Kennedy and birthday boy Peter Lawford. Lawford was Kennedy's brother in law and was his connection to Hollywood. He served as a liaison between Hollywood and the Kennedy White House during the golden age of Camelot.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Incredible talent and humor, Rudy Vallee had.  I doubled up at his performances; they were so nuanced and yet so funny.  "The Bachelor and the Bobby Soxer" and "Unfaithfully Yours" were both outstanding examples of his stealing the picture (at least to me).

Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't know Edmund O'Brien won the award for "Contessa."  I have it on my DVR because I loved his performance so much.  I remember his daughter talking about the fact that he died of Alzheimer's; he who could recite reams of plays and poetry without forgetting a word suddenly couldn't remember anything.  A terrible shame, but a wonderful talent while we had him.  He was superb in that part.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't know Edmund O'Brien won the award for "Contessa."  I have it on my DVR because I loved his performance so much.  I remember his daughter talking about the fact that he died of Alzheimer's; he who could recite reams of plays and poetry without forgetting a word suddenly couldn't remember anything.  A terrible shame, but a wonderful talent while we had him.  He was superb in that part.

It was an unusual contest for Supporting Actor that year. Tom Tully for The Caine Mutiny; 3 actors from On the Waterfront (Cobb, Malden, Steiger); and O'Brien.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...