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Man wakes up with bat on neck, dies a month later


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Man wakes up with bat on neck, dies a month later

In mid-August, the Lake County man in his 80s woke up with a bat on his neck, according to the Illinois Department of Public Health. The species was collected and subsequently tested positive for rabies.

Health officials urged the man to start post-exposure rabies treatment, due to its high mortality rate, but the man declined.

One month later, officials said the man began experiencing symptoms consistent with rabies — including neck pain, headache, difficulty controlling his arms, finger numbness and difficulty speaking.

The rabies virus infects the central nervous system, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death. Without preventive treatment, rabies is typically fatal.

“Rabies has the highest mortality rate of any disease,” said IDPH Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike. “However, there is life-saving treatment for individuals who quickly seek care after being exposed to an animal with rabies. If you think you may have been exposed to rabies, immediately seek medical attention and follow the recommendations of health care providers and public health officials.”

If you find yourself in close proximity to a bat and are not sure if you were exposed, do not release the bat as it should be appropriately captured for rabies testing. Call your doctor or local health department to help determine if you could have been exposed and call animal control to remove the bat.

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Dracula is expanding his territory, they can't get rid of him this easily.

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5 hours ago, MovieMadness said:

Man wakes up with bat on neck, dies a month later

In mid-August, the Lake County man in his 80s woke up with a bat on his neck, according to the Illinois Department of Public Health. The species was collected and subsequently tested positive for rabies.

Health officials urged the man to start post-exposure rabies treatment, due to its high mortality rate, but the man declined.

One month later, officials said the man began experiencing symptoms consistent with rabies — including neck pain, headache, difficulty controlling his arms, finger numbness and difficulty speaking.

The rabies virus infects the central nervous system, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death. Without preventive treatment, rabies is typically fatal.

“Rabies has the highest mortality rate of any disease,” said IDPH Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike. “However, there is life-saving treatment for individuals who quickly seek care after being exposed to an animal with rabies. If you think you may have been exposed to rabies, immediately seek medical attention and follow the recommendations of health care providers and public health officials.”

If you find yourself in close proximity to a bat and are not sure if you were exposed, do not release the bat as it should be appropriately captured for rabies testing. Call your doctor or local health department to help determine if you could have been exposed and call animal control to remove the bat.

*****************************************************

Dracula is expanding his territory, they can't get rid of him this easily.

Sounds like Donald Trump, including the mortal toxicity!!

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I've had a bat get in my house three times now. They're murder to find once they have landed somewhere because they're small and can crawl in the tiniest spaces..

I caught the last one by waiting until it was dark and turning out all the lights in the house except one in the bathroom (where it is difficult for a bat to hide). Eventually the creature was drawn to the light and I went into the bathroom quickly closing the door so he couldn't escape. When he finally landed on some curtains I quickly placed a towel around him. He emitted some high pitched squeaks but I took him outside in the towel (making sure to close my door to the house so he didn't fly back in). I then set the towel down on the grass and after a minute or so the bat crawled out from it and flew away.

When a bat is flying around inside your house, while it may be tempting to try to knock him out of the air with a towel I didn't do so because their wings are so fragile and could easily break. Waiting for it to get dark to turn on that light was the most difficult thing to do but finding the creature on your own is a major challenge, especially if he could be anywhere in the house.

Whenever I put my dog out at night in the summer now I make sure to turn out any lights at the back of the house so as to not attract a bat. August is their mating month, I believe, and the month in which more of them fly into houses than any other month in the year. The last time a bat got in my house was in an August.

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1 hour ago, laffite said:

Sounds awful. And I though crickets were bad.

The first time I got a bat in my house I heard him flying around my bedroom in the dark, thinking that was one heck of a moth I was hearing fluttering around. Anyway after I turned on the light and saw what it was I ran to get a towel but by the time I got back to my bedroom he had landed somewhere and I couldn't find him. I shut my bedroom door so he wouldn't get into the house and went back to sleep.

The next day I went to work, making sure to keep my bedroom door closed. That evening when i got home I tore my bedroom apart and finally found him clinging to the back of a dresser, that dresser no more than an half inch from the wall. I was amazed he could fit into a space that small. I put a towel around him then set him free in the backyard.

I appreciate the fact that many people wouldn't have been able to fall back asleep, knowing there was a bat in the same room. I'm amazed that I did myself. I don't know that I could do that again today, fearful of the small possibility of rabies. I guess I was more casual about stuff like this in those days even though it was a first time experience.

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11 minutes ago, TomJH said:

The first time I got a bat in my house ...

And I thought crickets were bad.

Is there anything on the market to exterminate them? Or do you kill? I'm a killer myself but only if they (whatever pest may be) are in the house and if only if I am sufficiently traumatized. 

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16 minutes ago, laffite said:

And I thought crickets were bad.

Is there anything on the market to exterminate them? Or do you kill? I'm a killer myself but only if they (whatever pest may be) are in the house and if only if I am sufficiently traumatized. 

Are you talking about killing a bat or a cricket? I would try to spare either one, if possible. That's why I used the towel to capture the bat. Once a bat lands (especially if he's blinded by light) he's easy to catch. The trick is to find him.

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Regarding bats just have to find the entry point and screen or block it off.  I had to get rid of a couple of bats in the building where I work some time back.  Simply held a glass jar up to them while hanging from the ceiling then quickly put a lid on it then went outside and set them free.

Bats eats their weight in insects, thus naturally beneficial.

Where-bats-roost-in-Attic.jpg

 

Like to add it's not the bats fault covid-19 exist, man encroached into their environment.

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13 hours ago, hamradio said:

Bats eats their weight in insects, thus naturally beneficial.

 

Bats are VERY beneficial. I had a boss who had a bat house built on top of his cottage. All his neighbours thought he was nuts but he told me he was the only cottager in the area who could lie out in his backyard without being eaten alive by insects.

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