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Back to movies, I have seen the 1977 Dan Aykroyd film "Love at First Sight." Supposed to be Dan Aykroyd's first movie.

I don't remember it being that bad, iut reviews weren't good. Lot of physical comedy, KFC jokes, filming in Niagara Falls, Canada, back in the day...
 

 

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A Canadian Ryan Reynolds movie before he became a big shot in U.S. is "Foolproof" with David Suchet as bad guy:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foolproof_(film)

I like Ryan Reynolds, he's a lot like Jim Carrey, and it seems like it took Hollywood a bit to figure out how to use him, but he's a major movie star nowadays...

Filmed in Toronto with a fairly large budget for a Canadian movie.

 

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16 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Oh yes,  lovable Elwy Yost and "Saturday Night at the Movies" ;  Elwy was showing classic ,  often rare old movies long before TCM was even a twinkle in Ted Turner's eye.  

What a great show that was,  I so looked forward to it.  Saw many great old movies for the first time on "Saturday Night at the Movies".  

Wasn't available to all Canadians,  just Ontario residents,  since it was a TVO production.

We got Mr. Yost and his program here in the metro Detroit area too.  Yep,  surely a movie host that set the bar high.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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I remember a show called something like What's Happening (living in WNY, got Canadian TV - still do).  It was sort of like American Bandstand and it where I first saw The Guess Who.

Also remember some sort of Cartoon Series with Dorothy Returning to Oz (this would have been in the 60's or 70's

Canadian TV was also a good place to watch Olympics and other sports.

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Probably getting tired of me posting, but just a few more.

"The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz" is a Canadian classic. Starred Richard Dreyfuss in his first lead role in a movie. Waaaaaay back in 1974:

 

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One more would be "Black Christmas" also from 1974. Starred Keir Dullea, Margot Kidder, Andrea Martin (later on "SCTV"), and others...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Christmas_(1974_film)

Filmed in Toronto with much filming done at the downtown campus of U of T. Soldiers' Tower at Hart House is featured. Spent lots of time there as a student.  Hart House library on 2nd floor, cafe in basement. Also swimming pool in basement. People could rent rooms to stay there for short periods if visiting Toronto, etc. Quite the place.

Anyway, movie trailer here:

 

 

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Sure, Canadian produced movies are no worse or necessarily better than Hollywood fare.  A couple I like are;

THE SILENT PARTNER('78) -(I've been vocal about this one here several times)

CANDY MOUNTAIN('88) --  At least I think it's a Canadian production.

Sepiatone

 

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There was a dog show called The Littlest Hobo about a German Shepherd with an almost supernatural intelligence that roamed the countryside helping people. He'd ride railroad boxcars and jump off when he sensed someone needed help. Someone posted on youtube a few of the  episodes from the first series. It was remade years later and was a big hit in the UK and Australia.

 

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3 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I remember a show called something like What's Happening (living in WNY, got Canadian TV - still do).  It was sort of like American Bandstand and it where I first saw The Guess Who.

Also remember some sort of Cartoon Series with Dorothy Returning to Oz (this would have been in the 60's or 70's

Canadian TV was also a good place to watch Olympics and other sports.

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Tales of the Wizard of Oz (1961).  Just dreadful.  Made by Crawley Films in Ottawa I believe.  Here is another dreadful Canadian cartoon series ...

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The Mighty Hercules (1963).

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Then there were the good old small channel Canadian game shows from the 60's where after a half hour of competition the winner would take home the grand prize of $25.  :lol:

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1 hour ago, jameselliot said:

There was a dog show called The Littlest Hobo about a German Shepherd with an almost supernatural intelligence that roamed the countryside helping people. He'd ride railroad boxcars and jump off when he sensed someone needed help. Someone posted on youtube a few of the  episodes from the first series. It was remade years later and was a big hit in the UK and Australia

This was a central plot in one episode of Corner Gas.  Hank found a stray dog and thought it was Hobo.

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Rusty and Gerome had a dressing room next to my little cubby hole of an office.  I could hear their voices but I was so disinterested in 1975 that I didn't even bother to look too see who they really were.

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3 hours ago, RMeingast said:

One more would be "Black Christmas" also from 1974. Starred Keir Dullea, Margot Kidder, Andrea Martin (later on "SCTV"), and others...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Christmas_(1974_film)

 

 

 

The house used in "Black Christmas" is in a very fancy neighbourhood not far from Casa Loma in Toronto:

002_RBI-image-1011139

https://canada.constructconnect.com/dcn/news/projects/2015/10/house-design-key-to-a-canadian-horror-classic-1011137w

https://www.facebook.com/VintageToronto/photos/house-of-mrs-lionel-clarke-6-clarendon-crescent-casa-loma-neighbourhood-toronto-/1224464994290149/

It was built for H.H. Beck, an insurance company big shot back in the day... Lionel H. Clarke, President of the Canada Malting Company (also Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario between 1919 and 1921) bought the house in 1914 and lived there until his death in 1921.

You can read about the history of the home here as it is now a protected house under the Ontario Heritage Act:
https://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwj49Z-oib7zAhVfGFkFHfFUCbYQFnoECAkQAQ&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.heritagetrust.on.ca%2Ffr%2Foha%2Fdetails%2Ffile%3Fid%3D2050&usg=AOvVaw3l1yWIfNtzxdxIzMoKXG5I

 

 

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9 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Mr-Dressup-70s-w-cf-clean.jpg

I worked at the CBC for a summer in 1975 and came across quite a few celebrities.  I recall seeing Ernie Coombs, who played Mr. Dressup.  He was in a stairwell smoking a cigarette and swearing his head off at no one in particular.  I guess he was just letting off some steam.

 

Whaaat  ?? !!  Gentle Mr.  Dressup smoking and swearing  ?? !!  I am utterly disillusioned !  If Mr.  Dressup swore and smoked,  what hope is there for decency in the world ?

Next you'll be telling me The Friendly Giant,   (aka Bob Homme)  was caught gambling and drinking gin in the gutter !  

 

(edit:  I posted this before,  but my internet connection went off-line at the exact moment I hit "save" and the above weird ghost post was the result.  Sorry about that,  chief.)

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Memory banks fueled up with Timmies - it's Roll Up the Rim time - and so got a few more for yous...

Americans might know Canadian actor Gordon Pinsent from his role as Jamie McDonald in "The Thomas Crown Affair" from 1968. He was also in "Colossus: The Forbin Project"and even "Blacula."
Pinsent has had a long career in Canada on TV shows, movies, in music... Very talented.

He wrote and starred in a famous Canadian movie from 1972, "The Rowdyman," about a guy's life in Newfoundland.

 

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On the subject of Pinsent, I remember watching the CBC series "A Gift to Last" in the later 1970s. It started out as a one-off Christmas special and then was developed into a TV series.  Pinsent wrote and co-starred in it...

 

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Another highly-regarded Canadian movie from 1973 that starred Keir Dullea as a hockey player in Saskatchewan, "Paperback Hero":
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paperback_Hero_(1973_film)

Remember the Gordon Lightfoot tune "If You Could Read My Mind" on the soundtrack... The original movie title was changed to fit the Lightfoot song...

 

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A little bit before my time was the CBC sci/fi series "Space Command."  It was on the CBC during 1953 and 1954. Starred James Doohan and William Shatner, among others like Barry Morse:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_Command_(TV_series)

A hit TV series for the CBC... James Doohan and Shatner, of course, went on later to star in "Star Trek" on American TV. But this Canadian series featuring both was 12/13 years before "Star Trek." Unfortunately, all the episodes but one are lost.

The only existing episode is from November 1953 and features Doohan. Historians have tried to find scripts, copies, etc. with no luck:
https://web.archive.org/web/20110706165225/http://www.avtrust.ca/VanishingSpaceCommand.pdf

Only existing episode today here (BTW, that's Scotty sitting in the chair at the back):

 

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A fun Canadian Series that my wife and I've stumbled onto recently is Murdoch Mysteries (Citytv  January 20, 2008 to present) based on characters from the Detective Murdoch novels by Maureen Jennings  about a police detective working in Toronto, Ontario in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Its entertaining.

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Canadian actor Christopher Plummer's career to stardom took off like a rocket but he had his first TV appearance on the CBC in February 1953 in "Othello."

Lorne Greene played Othello, with Patrick Macnee as Cassio and you can see Plummer at the back. This CBC program was also Lorne Greene's TV debut:
 

Blue-ribbon panel twice denies Lorne Greene a bronze plaque | CBC News

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40 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

A fun Canadian Series that my wife and I've stumbled onto recently is Murdoch Mysteries (Citytv  January 20, 2008 to present) based on characters from the Detective Murdoch novels by Maureen Jennings  about a police detective working in Toronto, Ontario in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Its entertaining.

CityTV broadcast Murdoch Mysteries for its first five seasons but they changed the show's time slot so often that it became apparent they were looking for an excuse to cancel the series due to poor ratings (no wonder if viewers don't know where to find it). After Season Five it was cancelled but CBC picked it up, put it in a solid Monday evening time slot and the ratings took off. This year Murdoch Mysteries started Season 15, with 24 episodes announced, the biggest season in the series' history.

It's fun watching the adventures of this turn-of-the-century Toronto detective, who often acts as an amateur inventor/scientist with his creations to try to help crack crimes. Among other inventions he created an early lie detector test. There will also be some episodes in which famous historical characters of the time may appear (among them Charlie Chaplin and Stan Laurel). Bill Shatner as Mark Twain, to be honest, I found a little hard to swallow.

Murdoch Mysteries - CBC Media Centre

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