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So good in 1950's The Cage, 1951's Detective Story and 1955's Interrupted Melody, receiving Best Actress Oscar nods for all three.  Also great performances in Scaramouche, The Man with the Golden Arm, The Woman in White, The Voice of the Turtle, Home from the Hill and Above and Beyond.  Plus her supporting role as the Baroness in The Sound of Music.  Great actress who deserves to be better remembered today.

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1 hour ago, filmnoirguy said:

So good in 1950's The Cage, 1951's Detective Story and 1955's Interrupted Melody, receiving Best Actress Oscar nods for all three.  Also great performances in Scaramouche, The Man with the Golden Arm, The Woman in White, The Voice of the Turtle, Home from the Hill and Above and Beyond.  Plus her supporting role as the Baroness in The Sound of Music.  Great actress who deserves to be better remembered today.

I agree with you. Plus she had a very good range, so funny in Scaramouche and so good in her dramatic roles. I'd add she was very beautiful. She was stunning in Scaramouche. When I notice that Eleanor is in a film, I make a point of watching that film. 

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1950 is one of the most discussed years regarding the Best Actress nominations. Here are my choices, in order:

Eleanor Parker -- Caged

Judy Holliday -- Born Yesterday

946e35918a5c9ce425ddf0f043f3988c.jpg?w=5

Then come the other three ladies: Baxter, Davis, Swanson. I love them all, but Parker and Holliday were the top!

 

 

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4 minutes ago, Swithin said:

1950 is one of the most discussed years regarding the Best Actress nominations. Here are my choices, in order:

Eleanor Parker -- Caged

Judy Holliday -- Born Yesterday

946e35918a5c9ce425ddf0f043f3988c.jpg?w=5

Then come the other three ladies: Baxter, Davis, Swanson. I love them all, but Parker and Holliday were the top!

 

 

My favorite Eleanor Parker performance is CAGED. She was so believable being transformed from a wide-eyed innocent to a hardened, street-wise ex-con by the end of the film.

Of course Parker also happens to appear in my favorite musical of all time THE SOUND OF MUSIC, as the sly Baroness. She was great in there as well, though I knew she never stood a chance against Maria for the Captain's affections.

Parker was always a joy to watch in whatever film she appeared in.

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I like her very much,she is good in a delightful comedy from 1951 titled 'A Millionnaire For Christy,I have seen almost all of her films,she is very beautiful in Technicolor, .She looked fantastic in The Naked Jungle & Scaramouche..The photo is from George Hurrell and I'am looking at it right now,from 1942,just starting her career, best photo I have ever seen of her.

parker.jpg

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I thought she was perfection in  The Sound of Music.  In a part where the audience was prepared to dislike her because she  was Julie Andrews's rival, she remained dignified and wise and  earned our respect.

I really disliked her in Of Human Bondage, but the Bette Davis version is one of my favorite things and a very hard act to follow.

Everything else was fine by me, but I always thought Eleanor acted with her chin and that was a little distracting to me.

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Big fan of Eleanor Parker but only fairly recently when she was SOTM.    She started out at Warner Bros the studio that didn't feature actresses, other than Davis and later Crawford,  very well (verses their male stars),   so Parker was competing for roles with the other actresses at WB like DeHavilland, Lupino,  and Alexis Smith.

Parker made some good films for the studio in the 40s but the 50s were her decade and she really excelled in all type of roles.

She had a sophisticated screen persona but she could play sexy and dangerous like her role in Scaramouche.

Eleanor Parker, 1946' Photo | Art.com

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I was surprised to see her generate erotic energy in The Naked Jungle, which is a film I think TCM has aired twice, and 20 years apart, at that. There's a scene where she's rubbing linament or something on the bare chest of her repressed huband for whom she arrived via mail order played by Charlton Heston, and it's quite steamy, to say the least.

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1 minute ago, Roy Cronin said:

They should dispense with almost all of those subforums.

Do you mean the genre forums? I don't agree. They are very convenient for easily locating a person or a topic or a niche that a user might want to read or write about. Posts are quickly buried in the popular threads. The genre boards don't get much posting traffic, no, but they get views. I'm glad they're there.

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31 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

They should dispense with almost all of those subforums.

I never, ever visit them, so I would have missed this lovely tribute to Eleanor Parker.

Generally speaking.

 

If everything posted in the genre forums were crammed into General Discussions, you might have missed this thread. 

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I love Eleanor Parker.  She has such a beautiful voice.  She was also very adept at portraying a wide variety of different types of characters.  

One of my favorite films of Parker's is The Very Thought of You.  This film is one of those WWII homefront movies that were popular during the early 1940s.  In the film, Parker plays a young woman who meets an old acquaintance (Dennis Morgan) during the days leading up to Thanksgiving.  Morgan, along with his friend Dane Clark , are soldiers on a 3-day leave for the Thanksgiving holiday.   Parker invites Morgan to her family's home for Thanksgiving, where he's given a very cold reception.  Parker's mother, Beulah Bondi, doesn't approve of her daughter being involved with a soldier.  Part of this stems from Parker's older sister Molly's marriage to a soldier.  She is depressed that her husband is away and to cope (I guess?) she's dating other men.  Then Parker's brother, who medically cannot fight in the war, is openly hostile as well.  It is apparent though that he feels some sort of shame because he isn't able to go to war.  The only family members who support Parker and Morgan's relationship is her father, Henry Travers, and younger sister. Clark and Parker's friend, Faye Emerson, also have a fun "no strings attached" type fling.  This is a very sweet, romantic film and is a good example of the comforting WWII homefront films that I find so much more appealing than the films depicting the actual war.

Another great Eleanor Parker film is Never Say Goodbye, co-starring my fave, Errol Flynn.  Parker and Flynn make a gorgeous couple in this film.  It's one of my annual Christmas films.  Parker and Flynn also have a hilarious daughter named Flip.  Normally, I don't care for child actors, but this little girl is funny.  In this film, Parker and Flynn are a divorced couple and Flip is the poor kid who is shuffled back and forth between her two parents.  Flip desperately wants her parents to get back together.  At the same time, she's also pen pals with Forrest Tucker, a soldier, who unexpectedly appears in Parker's bathroom wanting to meet "Smoochie."  When mailing a photograph to Tucker, dad Flynn has Flip mail a photo of Parker instead.  There are some very funny scenes with Flynn dressed as Santa, where he even recreates the Duck Soup mirror routine.  Lucile Watson plays Parker's mother who has a disdain for Flynn, whom she deems a womanizer due to his profession.  SZ Sakall plays a restauranteur and friend of Flynn and Parker's.  And my girl, Hattie McDaniel, plays Flip's nurse who mysteriously disappears about halfway through the film.  Bogart has a voice cameo playing Flynn's vocal impression of a gangster.

Other Parker films I enjoy:

Caged!

Callaway Went Thataway

A Millionaire for Christy

Woman in White

Pride of the Marines

The Voice of the Turtle

 

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20 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Parker's mother, Beulah Bondi, doesn't approve of her daughter being involved with a soldier.  Part of this stems from Parker's older sister Molly's marriage to a soldier. 

Looks like you wish to be kind to mother  (ha ha);  But really Bondi's mother was so bitter,  mean,  uncaring,  etc...  that when she slaps Parker I wanted Travers to sock the old bag in the choppers!      What I did like was the transparently shown in the various relationships;  Travers didn't appear to love his wife anymore than I did but since there were younger children wasn't going to divorce her.     The older sister behavior was selfish but also bold,  but I did find her transformation somewhat phony.  

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18 minutes ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

Looks like you wish to be kind to mother  (ha ha);  But really Bondi's mother was so bitter,  mean,  uncaring,  etc...  that when she slaps Parker I wanted Travers to sock the old bag in the choppers!      What I did like was the transparently shown in the various relationships;  Travers didn't appear to love his wife anymore than I did but since there were younger children wasn't going to divorce her.     The older sister behavior was selfish but also bold,  but I did find her transformation somewhat phony.  

Yes.  I didn't tear into Bondi like I should have.  She was an awful woman in this film.  A complete 180 from how she is in films like Make Way for Tomorrow.  The family (save for Travers and sister Ellie) are so needlessly mean to Dennis Morgan when he shows up for the holiday dinner.  How awkward for him.   I always laugh when she freaks out about the glass baby bottles that Ellie is smuggling to Parker, and Bondi immediately assumes that it is Ellie who is pregnant! And Travers doesn't correct her at first. 

And the way that Bondi slaps Parker when she comes home late is awful.  She's a grown woman, who cares that she's home late.  I always figured that Bondi's attitude (minus the slap which was awful) was due to women being expected to stay at home until they marry. These women are basically treated like large, old children until they find a man who can now care for them. 

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20 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Yes.  I didn't tear into Bondi like I should have.  She was an awful woman in this film.  A complete 180 from how she is in films like Make Way for Tomorrow.  The family (save for Travers and sister Ellie) are so needlessly mean to Dennis Morgan when he shows up for the holiday dinner.  How awkward for him.   I always laugh when she freaks out about the glass baby bottles that Ellie is smuggling to Parker, and Bondi immediately assumes that it is Ellie who is pregnant! And Travers doesn't correct her at first. 

And the way that Bondi slaps Parker when she comes home late is awful.  She's a grown woman, who cares that she's home late.  I always figured that Bondi's attitude (minus the slap which was awful) was due to women being expected to stay at home until they marry. These women are basically treated like large, old children until they find a man who can now care for them. 

I was surprised to see Bondi play such a mother figure in The Very Thought of You.      I recall how she was in Remember the Night towards Stawynck and she was a thief about to steal away her son.       At first in The Very Thought of You I felt Bondi must be just play-acting; acting that way to try to influence a difficult situation.    I keep waiting for the wink or smile to her husband telling me that was the case.  But NO,  she was just down right mean.       

 

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4 minutes ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

I was surprised to see Bondi play such a mother figure in The Very Thought of You.      I recall how she was in Remember the Night towards Stawynck and she was a thief about to steal away her son.       At first in The Very Thought of You I felt Bondi must be just play-acting; acting that way to try to influence a difficult situation.    I keep waiting for the wink or smile to her husband telling me that was the case.  But NO,  she was just down right mean.       

 

Yes. Beulah usually plays such sweet women or kind of kooky women, like in the aforementioned Remember the Night  or The Sisters. I like her as the boarder complaining about “her convenience” in A Summer Place. 

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