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December 2021 scehdule


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Unsure I understand the previous post. TopBilled not so long ago had a post saying the true love of Hepburn's life was a woman, although I think she claimed it was Spencer in her autobiography. Though I guess I'm willing to accept that. But Hepburn was Tracy's "beard?" For whom? Are you saying he had an actual gay lover he was trying to cover for? Never heard that before.

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23 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Daytime December 3 Looks like daytime noirs

Night Parade (Hugh Trevor, Robert Ellis) (RKO, 1929)
Madam Satan (Kay Johnson, Reginald Denny) (MGM, 1930)
Journal of a Crime (Ruth Chatterton, Adolphe Menjou) (Warner Bros., 1934)
Satan Met a Lady (Bette Davis, Warren William) (Warner Bros., 1936)
The Strange Love of Martha Ivers (Barbara Stanwyck, Van Heflin) (Paramount, 1946)
The Man Who Cheated Himself (Lee J. Cobb, Jane Wyatt) (20th Century Fox, 1950)
Madeleine (Ann Todd, Norman Wooland) (Dist. in the US by Universal-International, 1950)

The lineup for primetime and late night of December 3 is completely unpublished, so who knows?

Could be female killers/villains as opposed to daytime noirs . . . 

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It's too bad New Year's Eve is "That's Entertainment" and "The Thin Man" yet again.   

A local channel years ago used to always show New Year's Eve with The Marx Brothers, Three Stooges or Abbott & Costello movies for several years.

How cool if TCM started making it a yearly tradition.  So many comedy teams/series that would qualify too. (Martin & Lewis, Laurel & Hardy, Ma & Pa Kettle, Francis, etc etc). 

I know they aired a Marx Brothers New Year's one time years ago.  Maybe the ratings didn't work?  Would be interesting to know

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17 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Unsure I understand the previous post. TopBilled not so long ago had a post saying the true love of Hepburn's life was a woman, although I think she claimed it was Spencer in her autobiography. Though I guess I'm willing to accept that. But Hepburn was Tracy's "beard?" For whom? Are you saying he had an actual gay lover he was trying to cover for? Never heard that before.

Just gossip and/or revisionist history.  We weren't there, so we'll never know   --  if it even is anyone's business anyway . . . 

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21 hours ago, lydecker said:

Could be female killers/villains as opposed to daytime noirs . . .

Good thought. I tend to think broad in order to make a guess quickly. But if I'd looked a little under the surface, I might have noticed that.

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I'm getting confused. Thought I'd posted this already, but it appears not. And whatever I typed before hasn't been saved, so ...

Primetime December 4 Whatever the first movie is of the night hasn't been listed yet, so I can't even guess at the theme. The second movie of the night is

Dance, Girl, Dance (Maureen O'Hara, Louis Hayward) (RKO, 1940)

Noir Alley
The Unsuspected (Joan Caulfield, Claude Rains) (Warner Bros., 1947)

I don't know if there's a theme exactly for late night, but they're showing one movie that will take up virtually all of the scheduled time

A Bridge too Far (Dirk Bogarde, James Caan) (United Artists, 1977)

 

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Early morning December 5 Jane Powell

A Date with Judy (Wallace Beery, Jane Powell) (MGM, 1948)
Two Weeks with Love (Jane Powell, Ricardo Montalban) (MGM, 1950)

After the rerun of Noir Alley, the afternoon seems to be a random run of movies with big-name stars:

Love Finds Andy Hardy (Lewis Stone, Mickey Rooney) (MGM, 1938)
Bundle of Joy (Eddie Fisher, Debbie Reynolds) (RKO, 1956)
Bell, Book and Candle (James Stewart, Kim Novak) (Columbia, 1958)
 

 

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My gosh, haven't I typed in all this information already? I return after 24 hours to find I'm faced with a blank field. I'm learning it's problematic to start to enter information and then walk away for a full day without posting. So, here we go, again  ...

Primetime December 5 looks maybe to be about the Jewish experience in early 20th century Europe, including a non-musical version of the Fiddler on the Roof story.

The Dybbuk (Avrom Morewski, Ajzyk Samberg) (Dist. in the US by Foreign Cinema Arts, Inc., 1938)
Tevya (Maurice Schwartz, Miriam Riselle) (Maymon Film, Inc., 1939)

Silent Sunday Night
La Boheme (Lillian Gish, John Gilbert) (MGM, 1926)

I don't know if there's any theme, but the movie in the middle of the night is
The Hunger (Catherine Deneuve, Susan Sarandon) (MGM, 1983)

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Daytime December 6 As often, I can't figure out what the heck the connecting theme is. There are Orson Welles' first two movies, but the only connection I see between all of them is that they're all in the TCM library. Maybe Robert Wise had something to do with them all? I don't know. Or maybe Agnes Moorehead is in all of them?

Citizen Kane (Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten) (RKO, 1941)
The Magnificent Ambersons (Joseph Cotten, Dolores Costello) (RKO, 1942)
Dark Passage (Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall) (Warner Bros., 1947)
Johnny Belinda (Jane Wyman, Lew Ayres) (Warner Bros., 1948)
The Great Sinner (Gregory Peck, Ava Gardner) (MGM, 1949)
Caged (Eleanor Parker, Agnes Moorehead) (Warner Bros., 1950)
Scandal at Scourie (Greer Garson, Walter Pidgeon) (MGM, 1953)

There are a full 12 hours of unlisted films for primetime and late night December 6, so I have no idea what's going on there.
 

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19 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Daytime December 6 As often, I can't figure out what the heck the connecting theme is. There are Orson Welles' first two movies, but the only connection I see between all of them is that they're all in the TCM library. Maybe Robert Wise had something to do with them all? I don't know. Or maybe Agnes Moorehead is in all of them?

Citizen Kane (Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten) (RKO, 1941)
The Magnificent Ambersons (Joseph Cotten, Dolores Costello) (RKO, 1942)
Dark Passage (Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall) (Warner Bros., 1947)
Johnny Belinda (Jane Wyman, Lew Ayres) (Warner Bros., 1948)
The Great Sinner (Gregory Peck, Ava Gardner) (MGM, 1949)
Caged (Eleanor Parker, Agnes Moorehead) (Warner Bros., 1950)
Scandal at Scourie (Greer Garson, Walter Pidgeon) (MGM, 1953)

There are a full 12 hours of unlisted films for primetime and late night December 6, so I have no idea what's going on there.
 

The theme is  A Salute to Agnes Moorehead.  Dec. 6th is her birthday!

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Daytime December 7 Well, it's Pearl Harbor Day, so it seems to be all World War II movies, I can't swear they're all Pacific theater movies or movies tied specifically to Pearl Harbor, but it seems likely.

Wings for the Eagle (Ann Sheridan, Dennis Morgan) (Warner Bros., 1942)
December 7th (Walter Huston, Harry Davenport) (Department of the Navy, 1943)
Air Force (John Garfield, Gig Young) (Warner Bros., 1943)
They Were Expendable (Robert Montgomery, John Wayne) (MGM, 1945)
The Deep Six (Alan Ladd, Dianne Foster) (Warner Bros., 1958)
Torpedo Run (Glenn Ford, Ernest Borgnine) (MGM, 1958)
Hell to Eternity (Jeffrey Hunter, David Janssen) (Allied Artists, 1960)

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Primetime December 7 appears to be Ernst Lubitsch. There's a gigantic gap in the schedule, presumably where TCM is trying to secure the rights to some airings, I assume most or all of them from Lubitsch's early career at Paramount. Here's what appears to be guaranteed to be shown:

Ninotchka (Greta Garbo, Melvyn Douglas) (MGM, 1939)
The Shop Around the Corner
 (Margaret Sullavan, James Stewart) (MGM, 1940)
That Uncertain Feeling (Merle Oberon, Melvyn Douglas) (United Artists, 1941)
To Be or Not to Be (Carole Lombard, Jack Benny) (United Artists, 1942)

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Daytime December 8 Looks like they're all movies about jazz and jazz bands

Street Girl (Betty Compson, John Harron) (RKO, 1929)
Big Business Girl (Loretta Young, Frank Albertson) (Warner Bros., 1931)
That Girl from Paris (Lily Pons, Jack Oakie) (RKO, 1936)
Hollywood Hotel (Dick Powell, Rosemary Lane) (Warner Bros., 1937)
Blues in the Night (Priscilla Lane, Betty Field) (Warner Bros., 1941)
Pete Kelly's Blues (Jack Webb, Janet Leigh) (Warner Bros., 1955)
All Night Long (Patrick McGoohan, Keith Mitchell) (Dist. in the US by Colorama, 1963)

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The primetime schedule for December 8 is blank. Yet another mystery. I think it's NIght Two of Ingrid Bergman's SOTM run. Maybe they're trying to secure some airings of out-of-library Bergman movies, like some of the ones I alluded to when discussing her first night. Hope so!

Anyway, late night is devoted to Bergman films directed by Roberto Rossellini

Stromboli (Ingrid Bergman, Mario Vitale) (Dist. in the US by RKO, 1950)
Europe '51 (Ingrid Bergman, Alexander Knox) (Dist. in the US by IFE Releasing Corp., 1954)
Journey to Italy (Ingrid Bergman, George Sanders) (Dist. in the US by Fine Arts Films, 1955)
Fear (Ingrid Bergman, Mathias Wieman) (Dist. in the US by Astor Pictures Corp., 1956)

 

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Daytime December 9 Tarzan. Looks like these are different versions from different studios with different stars, not just the MGMs.

Tarzan the Fearless (Buster Crabbe, Jacqueline Wells) (Principal Distributing, 1933)
Tarzan and His Mate (Johnny Weissmuller, Maureen O'Sullivan) (MGM, 1934)
The New Adventures of Tarzan Bruce Bennett, Ula Holt) (Burroughs-Tarzan Enterprises, 1935)
Tarzan Escapes (Johnny Weissmuller, Maureen O'Sullivan) (MGM, 1936)
Tarzan's Revenge (Glenn Morris, Eleanor Holm) (20th Century Fox, 1938)
Tarzan Finds a Son (Johnny Weissmuller, Maureen O'Sullivan) (MGM, 1939)
Tarzan's Secret Treasure (Johnny Weissmuller, Maureen O'Sullivan) (MGM, 1941)
Tarzan's New York Adventure (Johnny Weissmuller, Maureen O'Sullivan) (MGM, 1942)

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Primetime December 9 AGAIN the slot for the first primetime airing is left blank, and I can't even guess what the theme is from looking at the other films listed. If anybody has any idea, I'd appreciate the help. Here's what we know is showing:

Today, We Live (Joan Crawford, Gary Cooper) (MGM, 1933)
All about Eve (Bette Davis, Anne Baxter) (20th Century Fox, 1950)

Also, I'm baffled as to the connecting theme for the overnight movies. One of them is about a pretend marrage and another is about pretend motherhood, so maybe pretend domesticity is the link? I don't know. If it is the theme, we could have shoehorned in Christmas in Connecticut, which is usually a movie TCM airs in December.

Downstairs (John Gilbert, Paul Lukas) (MGM, 1932)
Dancing Co-Ed (Lana Turner, Richard Carlson) (MGM, 1939)
Honeymoon for Three (Ann Sheridan, George Brent) (Warner Bros., 1941)
Bundle of Joy (Eddie Fisher, Debbie Reynolds) (RKO, 1956)

Edit: Coming back weeks later because I noticed Bundle of Joy previously airs on December 5. There are plenty Christmas movie repeats a -comin', but I believe this is chronologically the first non-Noir Alley movie of the month to get a second airing.

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Daytime December 10 Looks like movies set in the Middle Ages. This was the topic of a recent thread on this board and may well have been inspired by someone looking at the movies programmed for this particular day, though I didn't catch it at the time if it was.

The Adventures of Robin Hood (Errol Flynn, Olivia DeHavilland) (Warner Bros., 1938)
The Flame and the Arrow (Burt Lancaster, Virginia Mayo) (Warner Bros., 1950)
Knights of the Round Table (Robert Taylor, Ava Gardner) (MGM, 1953)
The Warriors (Errol Flynn, Joanne Dru) (Allied Artists, 1955)
Quentin Durward (Robert Taylor, Kay Kendall) (MGM, 1955)
Camelot (Richard Harris, Vanessa Redgrave) (Warner Bros., 1967)

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Primetime December 10 Another primetime with a huge gap in the number of movies listed, so I can't even remotely guess at the theme. The first film of the night is the only one made public thus far, and it's:

West Side Story (Natalie Wood, Richard Beymer) (United Artists, 1961)

Late night appears to be TCM Underground-type Santa Claus movies:

Santa Claus (Jose Moreno, Ceasaro Quezadas) (Dist. in the US by K. Gordon Murray Productions, 1960)
Silent NIght, Deadly Night (Lilyan Chauvin, Gilbert McCormick) (Tri-Star, 1984)

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Daytime December 11 Saturday Matinee. I'm only listing the features.

Blazing Sixes (Dick Foran, Helen Valkis) (Warner Bros., 1937)
Of Human Hearts (Walter Huston, James Stewart) (MGM, 1938)
Torchy Blaine Playing with Dynamite (Jane Wyman, Allen Jenkins) (Warner Bros., 1939)

It's more Christmas movies, I think, in the afternoon. Wasn't part of The Man Who Came to Dinner partially set at Christmas? I know there's an ice skating scene.

A Christmas Carol (Reginald Owen, Gene Lockhart) (MGM, 1938)
The Man Who Came to Dinner (Bette Davis, Ann Sheridan) (Warner Bros., 1942)
Three Godfathers (John Wayne, Pedro Almendariz) (MGM, 1948)

 

 

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Oh, my God, more big secrets for primetime December 11. TCM isn't yet revealing what they're showing. Apologies for all my dramatic failures to provide even the most basic information for many, many night this month.

In the middle of the night, the connecting theme is Timothy Bottoms. Unsure he will be the theme for the entire night. Maybe TCM is working to secure The Last Picture Show. I don't know. Anyway, what we know is showing is:

The Paper Chase (Timothy Bottoms, Lindsay Wagner) (20th Century Fox, 1973)
Operation Daybreak (Timothy Bottoms, Martin Shaw) (Warner Bros., 1975)

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18 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

It's more Christmas movies, I think, in the afternoon. Wasn't part of The Man Who Came to Dinner partially set at Christmas? I know there's an ice skating scene.

Yes, The Man Who Came to Dinner is definitely a Christmas movie.

dinner.jpg

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Daytime December 12. I should probably give up trying to guess the themes. I'm obviously terrible at it. This one has some more fake domesticity situations. Maybe that's a monthly theme I'm unaware of. There are also some Christmas movies, but I have no idea what ties ALL of them together. And what a Japanese got in  in my pajamas, erm, I mean on this list, I'll never know! Probably something obvious in all of the plots that I'm missing. Here are the movies:

Third Finger, Left Hand (Myrna Loy, Melvyn Douglas) (MGM, 1940)
Christmas in Connecticut (Barbara Stanwyck, Dennis Morgan) (Warner Bros., 1945)
All Mine to Give (Glynis Johns, Cameron Mitchell) (RKO, 1957)
Cruel Gun Story (Jo Shishido, Chieko Matsubara) (Dist. in the US by the Criterion Collection, 2009)

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Primetime December 12 Very Early Career Francis Ford Coppola?

You're a Big Boy Now (Elizabeth Hartman, Geraldine Page) (Seven Arts, 1966)
Finnian's Rainbow (Fred Astaire, Petula Clark) (Warner Bros, 1968)

 

Silent Sunday Night
The Mysterious Lady (Greta Garbo, Conrad Nagel) (MGM, 1928)

TCM Imports
Street of Love and Hope (Abdel Hafez, Sabah) I'm unable to ascertain the American distributor, but it appears it was released in the United States in 1960
Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence (David Bowie, Tom Conti) (Dist. in the US by Universal, 1983)

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Daytime Decemer 13 Once again, I would say it's all noirs, or at least police procedurals. Or maybe heist movies. I'm only guessing. Someone who has a clearer idea of the theme is welcome to chime in.

Mildred Pierce (Joan Crawford, Jack Carson) (Warner Bros., 1945)
The Big Sleep (Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall) (Warner Bros., 1946)
Out of the Past (Robert Mitchum, Jane Greer) (RKO, 1947)
The Naked City (Barry Fitzgerald, Howard Duff) (Universal, 1948)
The Asphalt Jungle (Sterling Hayden, Louis Calhern) (MGM, 1950)
The Narrow Margin (Charles McGraw, Marie Windsor) (RKO, 1952)
Kansas City Confidential (John Payne, Coleen Gray) (United Artists, 1952)
Crime Wave (Sterling Hayden, Gene Nelson) (Warner Bros., 1953)

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On 10/23/2021 at 8:07 PM, sewhite2000 said:

Daytime December 7 Well, it's Pearl Harbor Day, so it seems to be all World War II movies, I can't swear they're all Pacific theater movies or movies tied specifically to Pearl Harbor, but it seems likely.

Wings for the Eagle (Ann Sheridan, Dennis Morgan) (Warner Bros., 1942)
December 7th (Walter Huston, Harry Davenport) (Department of the Navy, 1943)
Air Force (John Garfield, Gig Young) (Warner Bros., 1943)
They Were Expendable (Robert Montgomery, John Wayne) (MGM, 1945)
The Deep Six (Alan Ladd, Dianne Foster) (Warner Bros., 1958)
Torpedo Run (Glenn Ford, Ernest Borgnine) (MGM, 1958)
Hell to Eternity (Jeffrey Hunter, David Janssen) (Allied Artists, 1960)

One would think this would be a good day for the TCM premiere of The Thin Red Line.

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