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December 2021 scehdule


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Primetime December 13 Oh, man, once again, I really have no idea, but it could be a double feature of pursuits or chases.

Stagecoach (Claire Trevor, John Wayne) (United Artists, 1939)
North by Northwest (Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint) (MGM, 1959)

Late night, I don't really know either, but at least two of the films are about fortune hunting for a romantic partner, so that's my guess for all of them.

Body and Soul (Paul Robeson, Juila Russell) (Micheaux Film, 1925)
The Bride Wore Red (Joan Crawford, Franchot Tone) (MGM, 1937)
The Heiress (Olivia DeHavilland, Montgomery Clift) (Paramount, 1949)

 

 

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Daytime December 14 Children trying to play matchmaker for a widowed parent

Make Way for a Lady (Herbert Marshall, Anne Shirley) (RKO, 1936)
Listen, Darling (Freddie Barthlomew, Judy Garland) (MGM, 1938)
Kathleen (Shirley Temple, Herbert Marshall) (MGM, 1942)
Three Daring Daughters (Jeanette MacDonald, Jose Iturbi) (MGM, 1948)
A Ticklish Affair (Shirley Jones, Gig Young) (MGM, 1963)
The Courtship of Eddie's Father (Glenn Ford, Shirley Jones) (MGM, 1963)
Promise Her Anything (Warren Beatty, Leslie Caron) (Dist. in the US by Paramount, 1966)
Yours, Mine and Ours (Lucille Ball, Henry Fonda) (United Artists, 1968)
 

Edit: Whoops, quite a few more films than I originally posted. Now the whole list is on here!

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Primetime December 14 is a second night devoted to Ernst Lubitsch, who must be the "Director of the Month". The focus tonight is on his early European films.

Rosita (Mary Pickford, Holbrook Blinn) (United Artists, 1923)
Three Women (Pauline Frederick, May McAvoy) (Dist. in the US by Warner Bros., 1924)
So, This is Paris (Monte Blue, Patsy Miller) (Dist. in the US by Warner Bros., 1926)
The Student Prince at Old Heidelberg (Roman Novarro, Norma Shearer) (MGM, 1927)
The Doll (Ossi Oswalda, Herrman Thimig)(Dist. in the US by UFA, 1928)
The Oyster Prinicess (Victor Janson, Ossi Oswalda) (Dist. in the US by Kino Video, 2006)

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Daytime December 15 People wrongly framed

Alcatraz Island (Ann Sheridan, John Litel) (Warner Bros., 1937)
The Invisible Menace (Boris Karloff, Marie Wilson)  (Warner Bros., 1938)
They Drive by Night (George Raft, Ann Sheridan) (Warner Bros., 1940)
Washington Melodrama (Frank Moran, Ann Rutherford) (MGM, 1941)
The Big Punch (Wayne Morris, Lois Maxwell) (Warner Bros., 1948)
Flaxy Martin (Virginia Mayo, Zachary Scott) (Warner Bros., 1949)
Impact (Brian Donlevy, Ella Martin) (Warner Bros., 1949)
Night Watch (Elizabeth Taylor, Laurence Harvey) (Embassy, 1973)

The entire 12 hours of the primetime/overnight schedule has been left blank. This has been an incredibly frustrating month to report.

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14 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Daytime December 15 People wrongly framed

Alcatraz Island (Ann Sheridan, John Litel) (Warner Bros., 1937)
The Invisible Menace (Boris Karloff, Marie Wilson)  (Warner Bros., 1938)
They Drive by Night (George Raft, Ann Sheridan) (Warner Bros., 1940)
Washington Melodrama (Frank Moran, Ann Rutherford) (MGM, 1941)
The Big Punch (Wayne Morris, Lois Maxwell) (Warner Bros., 1948)
Flaxy Martin (Virginia Mayo, Zachary Scott) (Warner Bros., 1949)
Impact (Brian Donlevy, Ella Martin) (Warner Bros., 1949)
Night Watch (Elizabeth Taylor, Laurence Harvey) (Embassy, 1973)

The entire 12 hours of the primetime/overnight schedule has been left blank. This has been an incredibly frustrating month to report.

Daytime looks great.  The reason there are so many blanks in the schedule is because TCM is desperately seeking politically correct and/or cheap films from the 60's & 70's to dump into primetime.  

It's the new normal . . . 

 

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In fact, I think the missing night's programming is on the regularly scheduled night of the week for Ingrid Bergman's SOTM spotlight, so certainly THESE movies won't be replaced with more modern and/or PC fare. Two movies apparently remain on the schedule, the final two of the night.

Elena and Her Men (Ingrid Bergman, Jean Marais) (Dist. in the US by Warner Bros., 1957)
The Yellow Rolls Royce (Ingrid Bergman, Rex Harrison) (Dist. in the US by MGM, 1965)

Daytime December 16 A few of these movies are clearly about being snowbound, so this is my guess what all of them are about.

Snowed Under (George Brent, Genevieve Tobin) (Warner Bros., 1936)
The Ice Folllies of 1939 (Joan Crawford, James Stewart) (MGM, 1939)
My Reputation (Barbara Stanwyck, George Brent) (Warner Bros., 1946)
The Wild North (Stewart Granger, Wendell Corey) (MGM, 1952)
Home Before Dark (Jean Simmons, Dan O'Herlihy) (Warner Bros., 1958)
The Frozen Head (Dana Andrews, Anna Palk) (Warner Bros., 1967)

 

 

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Primetime December 16 Once again, almost the entire night's slate hasn't been made public yet, and I have no idea what the connective theme may be. But I will list the two films that have  been made public. One of them gives us a little "bonus extra" to Ingrid Bergman's SOTM run. 

Dance, Fools, Dance  (Joan Crawford, Cliff Edwards) (MGM, 1931)
Stromboli (Ingrid Bergman, Mario Vitale) (Dist. in the US by RKO, 1950)

Only two of the late night films are listed, the final two. I have no guess as to what the theme might be, but here they are:

Dark Victory (Bette Davis, George Brent) (Warner Bros., 1939)
Johnny Eager (Robert Taylor, Lana Turner) (MGM, 1942)

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Morning December 17 Looks like it's films about mail-order brides

Flesh and the Devil (John Gilbert, Greta Garbo) (MGM, 1926)
The Harvey Girls (Judy Garland, John Hodiak) (MGM, 1946)
Rachel and the Stranger (Loretta Young, William Holden) (RKO, 1948)

Then in the afternoon the theme seems to shift to, if not outright comedic Westerns, at least Westerns with tongue in cheek a bit:

Callaway Went Thataway (Fred MacMurray, Dorothy McGuire) (MGM, 1951)
4 for Texas (Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin) (Warner Bros., 1963)
McLintock! (John Wayne, Maureeen O'Hara) (United Artists, 1963)

Primetime is yet another night where the lineup isn't yet revealed. Wow.

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Daytime December 18 Morning is Saturday matinee. I'm only listing the features. 

The Mortal Storm (James Stewart, Margaret Sullavan) (MGM, 1940)
Meet John Doe (Gary Cooper, Barbara Stanwyck) (Warner Bros., 1941)
Bowery Bombshell (Leo Gorcey, Huntz Hall) (Monogram, 1946)
The Mysterious Desperado (Tim Holt, Richard Martin) (RKO, 1949)

Afternoon is more Christmas movies
In the Good Old Summertime (Judy Garland, Van Johnson) (MGM, 1949)
Holiday Affair (Robert Mithchum, Janet Leigh) (RKO, 1949)
Susan Slept Here (Dick Powell, Debbie Reynolds) (RKO, 1954)

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Primetime December 18 Giagantic blank spots in the schedule AGAIN. Maybe TCM is cooking up something super spectacular for December, but you probably won't hear about it from me. The only thing they're confirming as showing will be at least the second, maybe the third movie of the night:

Gold Diggers of 1933 (Warren William, Joan Blondell) (Warner Bros., 1933)

Then in the middle of the night, it's a couple of the Eastwood/Leone spaghettti Westerns:

A Fistful of Dollars (Clint Eastwood, Marianne Koch) (Dist. in the US by United Artists, 1967)
For a Few Dollars More (Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Clef) (Dist. in the US by United Artists, 1967)

Edit: Corrected a studio mistake above before someone caught me on it!

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Morning December 19 I don't know. Something about boys or movies with boys in prominent roles

Boys Town (Spencer Tracy, Mickey Rooney) (MGM, 1938)
On Borrowed Time
 (Lionel Barrymore, Cedric Hardwicke) (MGM, 1939)

Then the afternoon is a couple of very, very long Jesus movies:
Ben-Hur (Charlton Heston, Jack Hawkins) (MGM, 1959)
King of Kings (Jeffrey Hunter, Siobahn McKenna) (MGM, 1961)

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Primetime December 19 is another completely blacked out night as far as scheduling information goes. 

Silent Sunday nights apparently consists of a montage of Christmas shorts titled Christmas Past, although imdb refuses to acknowledge such a movie actually ever existed, so it may be a TCM creation, who knows?

TCM Imports

Mon Oncle Antone (Jacques Gagnon, Lyne Champagne) (Dist. in the US by Gendon Films, 1972)
Fanny and Alexander (Bertil Guv, Pernilla Allwin)  (Dist. in the US by Embassy, 1983)

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Morning December 20 Looks like a double feature about unwanted visitors

Kind Lady (Aline MacMahon, Basil Rathbone) (MGM, 1935)
The Man Who Came to Dnner (Bette Davis, Ann Sheridan) (Warner Bros., 1942)

 

Early afternoon appears to be movies about murder.

Cover Up (William Bendix, Dennis O'Keefe) (United Artists, 1939)
Backfire (Virginia Mayo, Gordon MacRae) (Warner Bros., 1950)

There's another huge gap where none of the primetime features are listed, so anybody's guess.
 

Edit: Must be at least the second airing of The Man Who Came to Dinner. I remember the shared photo with Jimmy Durante and a Christmas tree when I wondered earlier if it was a Christmas movie.

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Late night December 20 Once again, I am unsure about the theme. There are a couple kind of noirish films, at least one with a bit of a comic bent, and then there's another gap where we're not told what's aring the rest of the night. Here's what we do know:

Larceny, Inc. (Edward G. Robinson, Jane Wyman) (Warner Bros., 1942)
Lady in the Lake (Robert Montgomery, Audrey Totter) (MGM, 1947)

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So, to recap, EVERYTHING you read below was 99.9% typed already, then somebody posted on my November schedule thread. I dutifully drifted off to read it and post a Thanks emoji, then came back here, and everything I had already f*cking typed was GONE. So, everything you read below, I'm completely having to start over from scratch. You're welcome.

Pause. Boy, I am broken on the insides that the roughly one thousand words I typed are gone forever. I'm gonna repost this tomorrow  or the next day ... maybe.

 

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Okay, I've gotten over my pity party. Here we go again.

Morning December 21 is a couple of versions of the Three Godfathers story.

Hell is for Heroes (Charles Bickford, Raymond Hatton) (Universal, 1930)
Three Godfathers (Chester Morris, Lewis Stone) (MGM, 1936)

Then I don't know the theme for the rest of the daytime hours. Seems pretty random. There's one Christmas movie in there, and some of the other films have scenes set during Christmas, I think.

A Christmas Carol (Reginald Owen, Gene Lockhart) (MGM, 1938)
Room for One More (Cary Grant, Betsy Drake) (Warner Bros., 1952)
Period of Adjustment (Anthony Franciosa, Jane Fonda) (MGM, 1962)
The Lion in Winter (Peter O'Toole, Katharine Hepburn) (Embassy, 1968)
 

Edit: The 1938 A Christmas Carol airs, I think, three times this month? I don't believe we get the 1951 British version this year that everyone was so excited about a few years ago. Also, I think there are three airings of The Lion in Winter.

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Primetime December 21 Christmas movies! Or, I guess I should point out, MGM Christmas movies! Yaaaaayyyy! (Yay?)

The Shop Around the Corner (Margaret Sullavan, James Stewart) (MGM, 1940)
Blossoms in the Dust (Greer Garson, Walter Pidgeon) (MGM, 1941)
Meet Me in St. Louis (Judy Garland, Tom Drake) (MGM, 1944)
In the Good Old Summertime (Judy Garland, Van Johnson) (MGM, 1949)
Little Women (June Allyson, Rossano Brazzi) (MGM, 1949)

Other than any Noir Alley rpeats, at least Meet Me in St. Louis and Little Women become the first two films to air twice this month. I suspect The Shop Around the Corner has already aired also, but by God, I'm going to submit this post first before I move to another screen to check on that, because every time I move away from this screen before posting and then return, all the text is gone, and I really, really don't want to take a broad axe to my laptop. It's the only one I own. So, I'm going to make this post first, then bear with me while I check on Shop. Thanks ever so. 

Edit: Yes, Shop is previously scheduled to air as part of the Ernst Lubitsch spotlight on December 7, so three repeats tonight.

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Daytime December 22 Oh boy, again I have no idea what the theme is. It initially appears to be movies set in small towns, but I don't know that it religiously sticks to that after the first three or so films.

Penny Serenade (Irene Dunne, Cary Grant) (Columbia, 1941)
Our Vines Have Tender Grapes (Edward G. Robinson, Margaret O'Brien) (MGM, 1945)
My Reputation (Barbara Stanwyck, George Brent) (Warner Bros., 1946)
Never Say Goodbye (Errol Flynn, Eleanor Parker) (Warner Bros., 1946)
On Moonlight Bay (Doris Day, Gordon MacRae) (Warner Bros., 1951)
All Mine to Give (Glynis Johns, Cameron Mitchell) (RKO, 1957)

I want to say these are the second airings for this month for My Reputation and All Mine to Give, but I'm going to go ahead and post this information now before leaving this screen to confirm, because if I don't, everything I typed will be gone. Then I will edit later with confirmation or lack thereof.

Edit: Yes, All Mine to Give previously airs on December 12 and My Reputation on December 16, so there are at least four non-Noir Alley movies TCM is airing twice this month.

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Primetime December 22 Christmas movies. Some months ago, an extremely passionate and angry poster on these message boards insisted that Desk Set was NOT  a movie about trying to replace human workers with computers, based on 10 seconds of what the Spencer Tracy character claimed late in the movie, and thought the TCM presenter or presenters who said that that it was were incredibly stupid. I gently tried to argue, and the other poster let me know I was an incredibly stupid, stupid, stupid person for believing what I believed. So, let's all watch it in good cheer this holiday season and make up our own minds what it's about.

Christmas in Connecticut (Barbara Stanwyck, Dennis Morgan) (Warner Bros., 1945)
A Holiday Affair (Robert Mitchum, Janet Leigh) (RKO, 1949)
Desk Set (Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn) 20th Century Fox, 1957)

There's a gap in the late night programming where we dont' know what's airing yet, but late night ends with Bachelor Mother and its remake. 

Bachelor Mother (Ginger Rogers, David Niven) (RKO, 1939)
Bundle of Joy (Eddie Fisher, Debbie Reynolds) (RKO, 1956)

Edit: Going through the whole month at one time, I"m seeing all the repeats I previously missed when just making one or two posts a day. Tonight is the third airing of Bundle of Joy this month. I believe the day also gives us the second airings of Christmas in Connecticut and A Holiday Affair.

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On 10/24/2021 at 9:55 PM, sewhite2000 said:

Primetime December 10 Another primetime with a huge gap in the number of movies listed, so I can't even remotely guess at the theme. The first film of the night is the only one made public thus far, and it's:

West Side Story (Natalie Wood, Richard Beymer) (United Artists, 1961)

Late night appears to be TCM Underground-type Santa Claus movies:

Santa Claus (Jose Moreno, Ceasaro Quezadas) (Dist. in the US by K. Gordon Murray Productions, 1960)
Silent NIght, Deadly Night (Lilyan Chauvin, Gilbert McCormick) (Tri-Star, 1984)

The K. Gordon Murray Santa Claus is good silly fun and not to be missed for lovers of film oddities. Santa tangles with the Devil and checks on the children of the world through a long snakey periscope with an eyeball right out of Pee-Wee's Playhouse. It begins with a congress of children from around the world in their stereotypical native dress, which is sure to get this movie cancelled if any self-appointed purists stay up late enough to watch. They switched Underground from midnight to 2 AM for a reason, I think, to keep it as far away as possible from anyone too woke to understand the place of film travesties in the history of the medium.  TCM has shown it before but it doesn't come around often enough. It's a nice respite from the usual Christmas movies TCM shows every year, often two or three times.

,

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On 10/20/2021 at 8:59 PM, Polly of the Precodes said:

Just checked--it is! Although ANYTHING could happen to the schedule between now and then.

13772_tn.jpg

Kino just announced this title for 1/18/22, so the TCM listing looks a lot more likely right now. Any chance this release will be joined by other Lubitsch silents...So This Is Paris? Forbidden Paradise?

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Morning December 23 I can't even guess at the theme, because we're only told one movie that will be airing, then another gap before the Christmas movies begin at midday. That one movie is:

The Daughter of Rosie O'Grady (June Haver, Gordon MacRae) (Warner Bros., `1950)

Afternoon Christmas movies

Susan Slept Here (Dick Powell, Debbie Reynolds) (RKO, 1954)
Desk Set (Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn) (20th Century Fox, 1957)
Bell, Book and Candle (James Stewart, Kim Novak) (Columbia, 1958)
A Carol for Another Christmas (Peter Sellers, Robert Shaw) (ABC, 1964)

Some of these have aired before, but I will have to go back and check my previous posts before I put them on my "Non-Noir Alley Movies Airing At Least Twice In The Same Month" list, because i don't remember.

Edit: Bell, Book and Candle previously airs on December 5, Susan Slept Here on December 18 and Desk Set on December 22, so they all join the list. I swear I typed in Carol for Another Christmas once before also, but I can't find it either in my previous posts or on MCOH's list. So, maybe I hallucinated it, or maybe I'm just not looking hard enough. Let's say it's possibly airing for the second time this month.

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