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Favorite Rodgers and Hammerstein movie musical


Toto
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Recently, TCM had Rodgers and Hammerstein night.  I watched "Carousel" which I find to be one of the most interesting Oscar and Hammerstein movie musicals.  The story is surprisingly dark and emotional for a musical with a story that includes domestic abuse and the death of a main character.  I love the fantasy/dream sequence when the daughter is imagining her father (who she has never met) who she knows was a good-looking carousel barker.  Ballet dancers become the carousel horses.  It's beautifully done.  The songs in Carousel  (or almost any Oscar and Hammerstein musical) are nonstop fantastic.  They are not musicals with just one or two great songs. 

My all-time favorite Rodgers and Hammerstein musical movie is "Oklahoma".  I love the humor and choreography.  The dance during "Everything's Up to Date in Kansas City" includes a dancer jumping on top of a moving train.  The ballet sequence when Laurie is asleep after taking taking a sleeping medicine is so surreal.  Rod Steiger is an interesting bad guy in this film.

What are your favorite Rodgers and Hammerstein movie musicals?  Below are pictures from the ballet "Laurie's dream" sequence in Oklahoma.

 

Out Of My Dream" scene from Oklahoma! (1955) - YouTube     image.jpeg.d808f8e243bc6426d738a3a28de1192e.jpeg     Oklahoma - Tapestry Institute

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The King & I could just show the March of the Siamese Children, and I'd be happy.  ☺️

(The wretched 1999 animated version offered a few good ideas for how to open the original up past Fox's style of just pointing a camera at the stage version, but we get Yul Brynner, World's Coolest Man, for the tradeoff.)

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

The King & I could just show the March of the Siamese Children, and I'd be happy.  ☺️

My favorite part of the movie too. I especially like the little girl who accidently turns her back on The King!

I think this may be my favorite of the R&H movie musicals. Yul Brynner commands the screen and Deborah Kerr is at her most charming. I like the fact that both characters are so stubborn which makes for great conflict. 

And I love all the songs, "Hello Young Lovers" is very poignant and the "Getting To Know You" scene is great. Only complaint is that the Uncle Tom's Cabin sequence goes on a bit too long, but it turns out to be central to the plot.

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3 hours ago, Toto said:

Recently, TCM had Oscar and Hammerstein night.  I watched "Carousel" which I find to be one of the most interesting Oscar and Hammerstein movie musicals.  The story is surprisingly dark and emotional for a musical with a story that includes domestic abuse and the death of a main character.  I love the fantasy/dream sequence when the daughter is imagining her father (who she has never met) who she knows was a good-looking carousel barker.  Ballet dancers become the carousel horses.  It's beautifully done.  The songs in Carousel  (or almost any Oscar and Hammerstein musical) are nonstop fantastic.  They are not musicals with just one or two great songs. 

My all-time favorite Oscar and Hammerstein musical movie is "Oklahoma".  I love the humor and choreography.  The dance during "Everything's Up to Date in Kansas City" includes a dancer jumping on top of a moving train.  The ballet sequence when Laurie is asleep after taking taking a sleeping medicine is so surreal.  Rod Steiger is an interesting bad guy in this film.

What are your favorite Oscar and Hammerstein movie musicals?  Below are pictures from the ballet "Laurie's dream" sequence in Oklahoma.

 

Out Of My Dream" scene from Oklahoma! (1955) - YouTube     image.jpeg.d808f8e243bc6426d738a3a28de1192e.jpeg     Oklahoma - Tapestry Institute

Are you forgetting somebody here?

Richard Rodgers wrote the music.

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5 hours ago, Toto said:

Recently, TCM had Oscar and Hammerstein night.  I watched "Carousel" which I find to be one of the most interesting Oscar and Hammerstein movie musicals.  The story is surprisingly dark and emotional for a musical with a story that includes domestic abuse and the death of a main character.  I love the fantasy/dream sequence when the daughter is imagining her father (who she has never met) who she knows was a good-looking carousel barker.  Ballet dancers become the carousel horses.  It's beautifully done.  The songs in Carousel  (or almost any Oscar and Hammerstein musical) are nonstop fantastic.  They are not musicals with just one or two great songs. 

My all-time favorite Oscar and Hammerstein musical movie is "Oklahoma".  I love the humor and choreography.  The dance during "Everything's Up to Date in Kansas City" includes a dancer jumping on top of a moving train.  The ballet sequence when Laurie is asleep after taking taking a sleeping medicine is so surreal.  Rod Steiger is an interesting bad guy in this film.

What are your favorite Oscar and Hammerstein movie musicals?  Below are pictures from the ballet "Laurie's dream" sequence in Oklahoma.

 

Out Of My Dream" scene from Oklahoma! (1955) - YouTube     image.jpeg.d808f8e243bc6426d738a3a28de1192e.jpeg     Oklahoma - Tapestry Institute

All of 'Em. 😎

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  • Toto changed the title to Favorite Rodgers and Hammerstein movie musical
4 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

My favorite part of the movie too. I especially like the little girl who accidently turns her back on The King!

I think this may be my favorite of the R&H movie musicals. Yul Brynner commands the screen and Deborah Kerr is at her most charming. I like the fact that both characters are so stubborn which makes for great conflict. 

And I love all the songs, "Hello Young Lovers" is very poignant and the "Getting To Know You" scene is great. Only complaint is that the Uncle Tom's Cabin sequence goes on a bit too long, but it turns out to be central to the plot.

Yes, the little girl who accidently turns her back on the King is so cute!  I just watched The King and I again.  I hadn't seen it in a long time.  I was so surprised when I read the opening credits and read that Rita Moreno (who is also in West Side Story) stars as Tuptim.   She's very good.

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45 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

Pardon my ignorance. Is The Sound of Music Rodgers and Hammerstein? That would probably get my vote, if it is.

It is.  The R&H musicals on film:

  • Oklahoma!
  • Carousel
  • South Pacific
  • State Fair (written specifically for film)
  • The King and I
  • Flower Drum Song
  • The Sound Of Music

There was also Cinderella, which was written specifically for TV (reportedly seen by 100M people on CBS during its first live telecast in 1957).  It's been done multiple times on TV since, and a version made it to Broadway nearly 10 years ago now.

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10 hours ago, Toto said:

Recently, TCM had Rodgers and Hammerstein night.  I watched "Carousel" which I find to be one of the most interesting Oscar and Hammerstein movie musicals.  The story is surprisingly dark and emotional for a musical with a story that includes domestic abuse and the death of a main character. 

Carousel is my favorite, partly because I was in a production when I was in 6th grade, in public school in the Bronx, New York. As you say, a dark and emotional story, which makes it a particularly unusual choice for 10 and 11 year olds. Being in the show fostered in me a lifelong love of theater and musicals. I didn't have a large role, in fact only spoke one line, but I was a sailor and a fisherman and so onstage a lot, and in all of the choruses. I can sing all the songs for you right now!

Years later, when I saw my first professional production, I realized that one line was changed in our school show. In one scene, someone says: "Here's Arminy, she'll tell you." Arminy then sings:

"The clock just ticks your life away, there's no relief in sight.

It's cooking, and scrubbing and sewing all day, and the same thing's every night."

The line is actually: "And God knows what all night!"

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1 hour ago, Swithin said:

Carousel is my favorite, partly because I was in a production when I was in 6th grade, in public school in the Bronx, New York. As you say, a dark and emotional story, which makes it a particularly unusual choice for 10 and 11 year olds. Being in the show fostered in me a lifelong love of theater and musicals. I didn't have a large role, in fact only spoke one line, but I was a sailor and a fisherman and so onstage a lot, and in all of the choruses. I can sing all the songs for you right now!

Years later, when I saw my first professional production, I realized that one line was changed in our school show. In one scene, someone says: "Here's Arminy, she'll tell you." Arminy then sings:

"The clock just ticks your life away, there's no relief in sight.

It's cooking, and scrubbing and sewing all day, and the same thing's every night."

The line is actually: "And God knows what all night!"

So interesting about the changed line!  I love your story about being in Carousel when you were young.  Thanks for sharing it.

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2 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Pardon my ignorance. Is The Sound of Music Rodgers and Hammerstein? That would probably get my vote, if it is.

The Sound of Music is Rodgers and Hammerstein and the film was so beautifully directed by Robert Wise with musical numbers integrated into the gorgeous scenery of Austria.  I've always been a big fan of Julie Andrews.  What an amazing voice she has and she is so endearing in this movie.  The Sound of Music was hugely popular when it was released but critics felt it was too "sugary".  I don't have this problem.  i love the sweetness in this film.  Only problem I have is that the story really misrepresents history.  The Austrians welcomed the Third Reich into their country.  I understand that films take license with reality, but this bothered me.

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11 hours ago, Toto said:

So interesting about the changed line!  I love your story about being in Carousel when you were young.  Thanks for sharing it.

That's from the intro to What's the Use of Wonderin', and the film just omits that bit altogether.  The film cuts out several songs, cuts out the extensive prologues of others that serve to introduce and contextualize the songs, and sanitizes the lyrics of some of what remains.  Most notably, Billy's Soliloquy has several words changed or dropped, like damn, hell, bas*****, vir*gin, and God.

South Pacific also uses the word bas***** quite often, as the sailors teach it to Bloody Mary, and it becomes a favorite of hers.  You'll never hear Juanita Hall say it on the film, though.  They substitute stinker instead.

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3 minutes ago, Toto said:

The Sound of Music is Rodgers and Hammerstein and the film was so beautifully directed by Robert Wise with musical numbers integrated into the gorgeous scenery of Austria.  I've always been a big fan of Julie Andrews.  What an amazing voice she has and she is so endearing in this movie.  The Sound of Music was hugely popular when it was released but critics felt it was too "sugary".  I don't have this problem.  i love the sweetness in this film.  Only problem I have is that the story really misrepresents history.  The Austrians welcomed the Third Reich into their country.  I understand that films take license with reality, but this bothered me.

Hopefully no one uses TSOM for history or geography.  Salzburg is over 200km from the nearest Swiss border as the crow flies, and not just a hike over the mountains!  Germany is just over those mountains.  The von Trapp family history is also significantly changed for dramatic purposes, including Maria's age, and her original purpose for working for the family.

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If This Has No Place Here (Whatsoever); Lemme know Toto and i'll do what i csn to dismantle this post.

Favourite Musicals of Mine. (Not Neccesarily Rogers/Hammerstein Though). No Particular Order Either.

- Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.

- Finians Rainbow.

- Take Me Out to the BallGame.

- theMusic Man.

- Yankee Doodle Dandy.

- Anchors Aweigh.

- Singin In the Rain.

- theBandWagon.

- Kiss Me Kate.

- Annie Get Your Gun.

- Easter Parade.

- Royal Wedding.

And Now For A Couple or so Oddities that Might, or Might Not Be Cheating.

- A Cold Wind In August (might be "illegal nomination motion" with this particular one.)

- Sucker Punch.

- Birds of Prey.

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Favorite R&H musicals are Carousel and South Pacific.  I just love The Carousel Waltz .. so beautiful.  My mom had both of these albums so I listened to them a lot as a kid. I'm sure that's why they're my favorites.  This was in the late 50s and I didn't even see the movies until after I knew the songs by heart.  They started showing the movies on TV in the mid to late 60s.  It was such a treat when they were first shown.  Almost as exciting as when the Wizard of Oz was first shown.  People take it for granted these days when you can watch any movie any time you want.  We had to search through the weekly TV Guide back then to make sure we didn't miss a good movie.  To self:  OK Boomer.

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16 hours ago, AmandaBonner said:

Favorite R&H musicals are Carousel and South Pacific.  I just love The Carousel Waltz .. so beautiful.  My mom had both of these albums so I listened to them a lot as a kid. I'm sure that's why they're my favorites.  This was in the late 50s and I didn't even see the movies until after I knew the songs by heart.  They started showing the movies on TV in the mid to late 60s.  It was such a treat when they were first shown.  Almost as exciting as when the Wizard of Oz was first shown.  People take it for granted these days when you can watch any movie any time you want.  We had to search through the weekly TV Guide back then to make sure we didn't miss a good movie.  To self:  OK Boomer.

I relate to what you are saying!  When I was a kid, the annual showing of "The Wizard of Oz" was a huge deal.  Every other time, kids were running around outside.  During "The Wizard of Oz", every kid was inside watching it and the streets were strangely quiet.  I do love South Pacific too.

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