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The remarkable — and growing — onslaught of bad news for Trump


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https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2020/09/10/remarkable-growing-onslaught-bad-news-trump/

 

.....To wit, there’s been a trio of books and related revelations involving Trump personally and those close to him:

Trump was quoted in Woodward’s book admitting that he played down the coronavirus threat early on, despite saying as early as Feb. 7 that he knew the virus was easily transmissible and “deadly stuff.”
Trump’s former personal lawyer Michael Cohen released a book in which he described a history of racism and nefarious actions by Trump, alleging that Trump welcomed Russian interference and cozied up to Russian President Vladimir Putin for personal financial gain.
Trump’s niece Mary L. Trump, who wrote her own book, released a tape on which Trump’s sister, retired federal judge Maryanne Trump Barry, said the president has “no principles” and “you can’t trust him.”
Anonymous sources continued to paint the picture of an unfit president:

The Atlantic last week reported on — and outlets including The Washington Post and Fox News confirmed details of — Trump’s past disparagement of soldiers and the war dead.
Woodward’s book includes accounts of officials, including former director of national intelligence Daniel Coats and former defense secretary Jim Mattis, deriding Trump privately. “There may come a time when we have to take collective action” since Trump is “dangerous” and “unfit,” Mattis is reported as saying. In a separate conversation recounted by Woodward, Coats agreed that Trump has no moral compass: “True. To him, a lie is not a lie. It’s just what he thinks. He doesn’t know the difference between the truth and a lie.”
There are also increasing questions about the Justice Department intervening in legal matters in ways that benefit Trump personally:

The Justice Department sought to intervene on Trump’s behalf in a defamation case brought by a woman who accused Trump of rape, arguing that because he denied the accusations as president, the United States should be the defendant and not Trump. The move could delay the case ahead of the election and insulate Trump.
The New York Times’s Michael S. Schmidt reported in a book that then-Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein in 2017 quietly curtailed an investigation into Trump’s business ties to Russia, despite concerns about a possible counterintelligence threat.
The Russia issue has continued to dog Trump in other ways, too:

One report delved deeply into Trump’s Russia ties: A GOP-led Senate Intelligence Committee report went further than its predecessors in connecting the Trump campaign to Russia’s 2016 election interference. It said Trump’s then-campaign chairman Paul Manafort was in frequent contact with a man it described as a Russian intelligence officer, while saying the content of their contacts remain largely obscured.
The administration has made the controversial decision to scale back briefings on foreign election interference, drawing unusually public criticism from Coats.
A senior Department of Homeland Security aide, Brian Murphy, filed a whistleblower complaint alleging that acting DHS secretary Chad Wolf told him to stop providing intelligence on Russian election interference because it was unflattering to Trump, and that the directions came from Trump’s national security adviser, Robert C. O’Brien. Murphy also said Wolf and the DHS’s acting No. 2, Ken Cuccinelli, told him to massage intelligence reports on issues such as white supremacists to “ensure they matched up with the public comments by Trump on the subject of ANTIFA and ‘anarchist’ groups.”
That hasn’t been the only bad news emanating from DHS:

Another former DHS aide, Miles Taylor, has continued to speak out against Trump, alleging that Trump offered pardons to officials who broke the law for him and sought to use official resources to punish blue states.
Yet another former top DHS aide, Elizabeth Neumann, alleged that Trump has fomented domestic extremism and that he halted tougher earlier coronavirus measures “because he didn’t want the economy to tank and he didn’t want a distraction from his campaign.”
A Government Accountability Office report ruled that Wolf, who has spearheaded some of Trump’s more controversial policies in cracking down on unrest at racial-justice demonstrations, is illegitimately serving as DHS secretary.
These developments would constitute something amounting to a scandal in any administration. The fact that they’ve all come within the past month speaks to how much Trump has courted controversy in many of his actions as president — and how it has left him treading water.

The question with Trump is often: Does anything matter? Critics have been flabbergasted that similar allegations and revelations in the past have done little to damage his political standing. But what we’ve seen over the course of his presidency is that the majority-negative view of Trump has been remarkably consistent. Polls — including Thursday — have regularly shown that about half of voters say they’re not at all likely to back Trump’s reelection, suggesting a hardened opposition that will make it difficult for Trump to win. Trump’s share of the vote in polls, meanwhile, has struggled to climb out of the low 40s.


Will the Woodward book cause any significant shift in the poll numbers? Perhaps not. Trump’s supporters have consistently stuck with him through plenty of stuff like this. Many of them will see Trump’s comments in the most positive possible light or believe things are being exaggerated — despite arguably the most damaging revelation coming in Trump’s own words about the coronavirus. Others will believe his attributes outweigh his liabilities.

But Trump needs to get voters who aren’t already backing him. To the extent that those voters believe he misled the country about a deadly pandemic in which the United States currently finds itself in a uniquely bad position in the First World, and to the extent they believe Trump said such awful things about soldiers, are people who weren’t supporting him before going to be able to come around?

What’s particularly ominous for Trump is that the pace of these things suggests that plenty of people who know things and believe him to be an unfit president are apparently quite motivated to get them out before the election. And that could make driving other messages — and recovering in the 2020 race — much more difficult.

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37 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2020/09/10/remarkable-growing-onslaught-bad-news-trump/

 

.....To wit, there’s been a trio of books and related revelations involving Trump personally and those close to him:

Trump was quoted in Woodward’s book admitting that he played down the coronavirus threat early on, despite saying as early as Feb. 7 that he knew the virus was easily transmissible and “deadly stuff.”
Trump’s former personal lawyer Michael Cohen released a book in which he described a history of racism and nefarious actions by Trump, alleging that Trump welcomed Russian interference and cozied up to Russian President Vladimir Putin for personal financial gain.
Trump’s niece Mary L. Trump, who wrote her own book, released a tape on which Trump’s sister, retired federal judge Maryanne Trump Barry, said the president has “no principles” and “you can’t trust him.”
Anonymous sources continued to paint the picture of an unfit president:

The Atlantic last week reported on — and outlets including The Washington Post and Fox News confirmed details of — Trump’s past disparagement of soldiers and the war dead.
Woodward’s book includes accounts of officials, including former director of national intelligence Daniel Coats and former defense secretary Jim Mattis, deriding Trump privately. “There may come a time when we have to take collective action” since Trump is “dangerous” and “unfit,” Mattis is reported as saying. In a separate conversation recounted by Woodward, Coats agreed that Trump has no moral compass: “True. To him, a lie is not a lie. It’s just what he thinks. He doesn’t know the difference between the truth and a lie.”
There are also increasing questions about the Justice Department intervening in legal matters in ways that benefit Trump personally:

The Justice Department sought to intervene on Trump’s behalf in a defamation case brought by a woman who accused Trump of rape, arguing that because he denied the accusations as president, the United States should be the defendant and not Trump. The move could delay the case ahead of the election and insulate Trump.
The New York Times’s Michael S. Schmidt reported in a book that then-Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein in 2017 quietly curtailed an investigation into Trump’s business ties to Russia, despite concerns about a possible counterintelligence threat.
The Russia issue has continued to dog Trump in other ways, too:

One report delved deeply into Trump’s Russia ties: A GOP-led Senate Intelligence Committee report went further than its predecessors in connecting the Trump campaign to Russia’s 2016 election interference. It said Trump’s then-campaign chairman Paul Manafort was in frequent contact with a man it described as a Russian intelligence officer, while saying the content of their contacts remain largely obscured.
The administration has made the controversial decision to scale back briefings on foreign election interference, drawing unusually public criticism from Coats.
A senior Department of Homeland Security aide, Brian Murphy, filed a whistleblower complaint alleging that acting DHS secretary Chad Wolf told him to stop providing intelligence on Russian election interference because it was unflattering to Trump, and that the directions came from Trump’s national security adviser, Robert C. O’Brien. Murphy also said Wolf and the DHS’s acting No. 2, Ken Cuccinelli, told him to massage intelligence reports on issues such as white supremacists to “ensure they matched up with the public comments by Trump on the subject of ANTIFA and ‘anarchist’ groups.”
That hasn’t been the only bad news emanating from DHS:

Another former DHS aide, Miles Taylor, has continued to speak out against Trump, alleging that Trump offered pardons to officials who broke the law for him and sought to use official resources to punish blue states.
Yet another former top DHS aide, Elizabeth Neumann, alleged that Trump has fomented domestic extremism and that he halted tougher earlier coronavirus measures “because he didn’t want the economy to tank and he didn’t want a distraction from his campaign.”
A Government Accountability Office report ruled that Wolf, who has spearheaded some of Trump’s more controversial policies in cracking down on unrest at racial-justice demonstrations, is illegitimately serving as DHS secretary.
These developments would constitute something amounting to a scandal in any administration. The fact that they’ve all come within the past month speaks to how much Trump has courted controversy in many of his actions as president — and how it has left him treading water.

The question with Trump is often: Does anything matter? Critics have been flabbergasted that similar allegations and revelations in the past have done little to damage his political standing. But what we’ve seen over the course of his presidency is that the majority-negative view of Trump has been remarkably consistent. Polls — including Thursday — have regularly shown that about half of voters say they’re not at all likely to back Trump’s reelection, suggesting a hardened opposition that will make it difficult for Trump to win. Trump’s share of the vote in polls, meanwhile, has struggled to climb out of the low 40s.


Will the Woodward book cause any significant shift in the poll numbers? Perhaps not. Trump’s supporters have consistently stuck with him through plenty of stuff like this. Many of them will see Trump’s comments in the most positive possible light or believe things are being exaggerated — despite arguably the most damaging revelation coming in Trump’s own words about the coronavirus. Others will believe his attributes outweigh his liabilities.

But Trump needs to get voters who aren’t already backing him. To the extent that those voters believe he misled the country about a deadly pandemic in which the United States currently finds itself in a uniquely bad position in the First World, and to the extent they believe Trump said such awful things about soldiers, are people who weren’t supporting him before going to be able to come around?

What’s particularly ominous for Trump is that the pace of these things suggests that plenty of people who know things and believe him to be an unfit president are apparently quite motivated to get them out before the election. And that could make driving other messages — and recovering in the 2020 race — much more difficult.

(&) May it Only Continue, Compound; and Multiply.

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6 hours ago, NipkowDisc said:

jon stewart says the news media is making a big mistake coming at Trump as this incredibly nefarious evil villain.

Yea you're right, they should come at him as an insane bloviating  lunatic who needs to be locked up in a looney bin along with a good percentage of his reality deigning believers

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Hillary called Trump's supporters "deplorables" and it was used by Trump to his political advantage. For a while Jake on these boards called himself a "proud deplorable." But with the increasing number of revelations about this man, his racism (and blatant appeal to racists), his irresponsibility in downplaying the pandemic for political purposes, the sexual charges against him (including one of rape to which Trump, aside from his delaying court tactics, refuses to supply a DNA sample), etc., etc., what else can you call most of the supporters for turning a blind eye and continuing to support him?

Trump's self serving low moral character must, in turn, reflect that of many of his supporters. You certainly see racist comments on these boards from some of them, feeling free to now express their hatred. I'm just surprised at the sheer number of them. But deplorable, yes, it's an apt term to describe many of them.

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I don't see any of this "stuff" about Trump hurting the GOP;  In fact it is likely to help GOP candidates in the 2022 elections:  GOPers that will continue to vote for downstream GOP candidates because they know they will NOT be supporting Trump for President in 2024.       (to ensure Dems don't have too much power in Congress with a Dem President).

I'm interested in the POV of Ham and Dan, two that are not Trumpers but typically vote GOP (I assume):    E.g.  if it is Harris vs. Trump,  what they would do?     Will they continue to vote for GOP downstream candidates?

Note that CNN continue to frame all local elections as a statement on Trump trying to use guilt:  A vote for any GOPer is showing support for Trump.   This is total nonsense and I doubt it will have much of an impact.       I believe CNN is doing this because their own election predictions is the GOP wins today in Virginia.

 

 

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13 minutes ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

I'm interested in the POV of Ham and Dan, two that are not Trumpers but typically vote GOP (I assume):    E.g.  if it is Harris vs. Trump,  what they would do?     Will they continue to vote for GOP downstream candidates?

No vote for Trump or a maga candidate at the executive level. I did vote for a congresswoman who had worked for him, but I can't let Texas turn blue just because I don't like Trump. (No dem was going to win my district after the summer of 20 anyway. It was a similar feeling to the 18 midterms after the Kavanaugh smear. The Dems just plain pi$$ people off when they talk crazy. And they can't seem to stop talking crazy.)

But Trump doesn't need me in Texas, especially not if he is running against Harris. 

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16 minutes ago, LuckyDan said:

No vote for Trump or a maga candidate at the executive level. I did vote for a congresswoman who had worked for him, but I can't let Texas turn blue just because I don't like Trump. (No dem was going to win my district after the summer of 20 anyway. It was a similar feeling to the 18 midterms after the Kavanaugh smear. The Dems just plain pi$$ people off when they talk crazy. And they can't seem to stop talking crazy.)

But Trump doesn't need me in Texas, especially not if he is running against Harris. 

Thanks for the feedback;   So it looks like you are treating local elections,  as,,,  local elections.     Wow,  that might be too logical for most people these days (ha ha).

I can see Ham doing something similar since he is in West Virginia.

I don't think there are any non-Trumper GOPers at this forum from purple\battleground states.      I.e.  places were a split ticket vote might influence the outcome.      It would be interesting to get their POV.

 

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4 minutes ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

I don't think there are any non-Trumper GOPers at this forum from purple\battleground states.      I.e.  places were a split ticket vote might influence the outcome.      It would be interesting to get their POV.

 

I can't prove it by the exit polls but it seems obvious that with GOP gains everywhere in an election lost at the top of the ticket, there was quite a bit of either crossover or just plain skipping the presidential line in 2020. 

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1 minute ago, LuckyDan said:

I can't prove it by the exit polls but it seems obvious that with GOP gains everywhere in an election lost at the top of the ticket, there was quite a bit of either crossover or just plain skipping the presidential line in 2020. 

 Brad Raffensperger GA Sec of State made that point last night on Anderson Cooper when he was discussing his new book;   that downstream GOPers won in GA while Trump lost and that this was proof of split-ticket voting.       He was very pointed;     Trumper,  Trump lost fair and square,   the book has all the facts.   Wake up \ grow up.

 

 

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While people may vote for downstream GOP candidates, it still enables Trump and the Trumpists because he is the leader of the party.  In addition, he is involving himself in many, many races.

If the GOP wins in Congress,  the GOPers in charge will defer to Trump and his agenda - too afraid not to.  Same at the state level.  You can already see it by what GOP in Congress and state legislatures are saying and doing. 

Unfortunately, a vote for most Republicans now is a vote for Trumpism.

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Just now, ElCid said:

While people may vote for downstream GOP candidates, it still enables Trump and the Trumpists because he is the leader of the party.  In addition, he is involving himself in many, many races.

If the GOP wins in Congress,  the GOPers in charge will defer to Trump and his agenda - too afraid not to.  Same at the state level.  You can already see it by what GOP in Congress and state legislatures are saying and doing. 

Unfortunately, a vote for most Republicans now is a vote for Trumpism.

EXACTLY !!!  Those that fail to see this have their heads in the sand and are voting to end democracy.

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6 minutes ago, ElCid said:

the GOPers in charge will defer to Trump and his agenda - too afraid not to. 

What is Trump's agenda,  other than to be made President and if that doesn't work,  run in 2024? 

Are you saying  Trump has an actual legislative agenda?   E.g.  A GOP congress will push for building more border walls? 

Not agree to a debt celling increase?     Not produce any budget to screw up the Biden admin agenda?

If  those are example of Trump policy agenda items,   there is no way McConnell will bend to any of those.

 

 

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12 minutes ago, ElCid said:

Unfortunately, a vote for most Republicans now is a vote for Trumpism.

I tried to look it up on WIKI. There were a lot of different views for it his is At the 2021 CPAC conference, Trump gave his own definition of what defines Trumpism: "What it means is great deals, ... . Like the USMCA replacement of the horrible NAFTA. ... It means low taxes and eliminated job killing regulations, ... . It means strong borders, but people coming into our country based on a system of merit. ... [I]t means no riots in the streets. It means law enforcement. It means very strong protection for the second amendment and the right to keep and bear arms. ... [I]t means a strong military and taking care of our vets, ... ."[184][185] 

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38 minutes ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

What is Trump's agenda,  other than to be made President and if that doesn't work,  run in 2024? 

Are you saying  Trump has an actual legislative agenda?   E.g.  A GOP congress will push for building more border walls? 

Not agree to a debt celling increase?     Not produce any budget to screw up the Biden admin agenda?

If  those are example of Trump policy agenda items,   there is no way McConnell will bend to any of those.

 

 

We shall see.

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42 minutes ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

What is Trump's agenda,  other than to be made President and if that doesn't work,  run in 2024? 

Are you saying  Trump has an actual legislative agenda?   E.g.  A GOP congress will push for building more border walls? 

Not agree to a debt celling increase?     Not produce any budget to screw up the Biden admin agenda?

If  those are example of Trump policy agenda items,   there is no way McConnell will bend to any of those.

 

 

Trump has no actual agenda other than to benefit himself as we saw in the four years he was president.  However, he does have a sort of an agenda to appeal to his base (which has tremendous influence in GOP) and thereby create more power for himself - and his family and associates.  Trump wants to spread discord to such an extent that he and his adherents will dominate and control state governments and the federal government.

McConnell will bend whichever way benefits McConnell as we have seen ever since Obama became president - and worse under Trump.

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29 minutes ago, Marysara1 said:

Like I said there's different  ways people see it. There were at least 10 versions. His looks good on paper to me, but action is what's important. What do you think it means.? I know somebody mentioned  fascism.

See my response to James.  Trump Lies!

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5 hours ago, ElCid said:

Trump has no actual agenda other than to benefit himself as we saw in the four years he was president.  However, he does have a sort of an agenda to appeal to his base (which has tremendous influence in GOP) and thereby create more power for himself - and his family and associates.  Trump wants to spread discord to such an extent that he and his adherents will dominate and control state governments and the federal government.

McConnell will bend whichever way benefits McConnell as we have seen ever since Obama became president - and worse under Trump.

Trump doesn't even have a "sort of an agenda";   All he does is take the opposite positions of those he views as opponents in order to spread discord.   

McConnell will bend to whatever he feel will help win the GOP Senate seats.       Therefore he will not bend to any sort-of-Trump agenda and thus when you say he will bend,  I believe you're mistaken,  big time.     McConnell has shown he doesn't follow Trump or care about what he desires.     E.g.  the deal he made with Chuck and Nancy on the Debt celling.   

 

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5 hours ago, ElCid said:

Trump has no actual agenda other than to benefit himself as we saw in the four years he was president.  However, he does have a sort of an agenda to appeal to his base (which has tremendous influence in GOP) and thereby create more power for himself - and his family and associates.  Trump wants to spread discord to such an extent that he and his adherents will dominate and control state governments and the federal government.

McConnell will bend whichever way benefits McConnell as we have seen ever since Obama became president - and worse under Trump.

A kleptocracy and the destruction of democracy.  That's Trump's agenda.

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7 hours ago, Marysara1 said:

I tried to look it up on WIKI. There were a lot of different views for it his is At the 2021 CPAC conference, Trump gave his own definition of what defines Trumpism: "What it means is great deals, ... . Like the USMCA replacement of the horrible NAFTA. ... It means low taxes and eliminated job killing regulations, ... . It means strong borders, but people coming into our country based on a system of merit. ... [I]t means no riots in the streets. It means law enforcement. It means very strong protection for the second amendment and the right to keep and bear arms. ... [I]t means a strong military and taking care of our vets, ... ."[184][185] 

Just because Trump says these things doesn’t mean that they are true; he is a pathological liar, and has been all his life and throughout his presidency and to the present.   From the things he said here,  Trump did very little of substance for cops, the military or veterans.  

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13 hours ago, Marysara1 said:

I tried to look it up on WIKI. There were a lot of different views for it his is At the 2021 CPAC conference, Trump gave his own definition of what defines Trumpism: "What it means is great deals, ... . Like the USMCA replacement of the horrible NAFTA. ... It means low taxes and eliminated job killing regulations, ... . It means strong borders, but people coming into our country based on a system of merit. ... [I]t means no riots in the streets. It means law enforcement. It means very strong protection for the second amendment and the right to keep and bear arms. ... [I]t means a strong military and taking care of our vets, ... ."[184][185] 

"It means no riots in the streets"   Just take the riots to the Capitol to overthrow the government!  

210107-washington-rally-riot-protest-cap

And "It means great deals" ...

7d918465-3061-45b4-b907-d57211593855_cx1

And it means ...

11/03/2021 04:07:23
TOTAL ESTIMATED U.S. COVID-19 DEATHS: 723,116

Trump Death Clock

433,870
Estimated U.S. COVID-19 Deaths Due To POTUS Inaction
In January 2020, the Trump administration was advised that immediate action was required to stop the spread of COVID-19. According to NIAID Director Dr. Anthony Fauci, “there was a lot of pushback” to this advice. President Trump declined to act until March 16th. Experts estimate that, had mitigation measures been implemented one week earlier, 60% of American COVID-19 deaths would have been avoided. (For further reading, click here).
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8 hours ago, Arturo said:

Just because Trump says these things doesn’t mean that they are true; he is a pathological liar, and has been all his life and throughout his presidency and to the present.   From the things he said here,  Trump did very little of substance for cops, the military or veterans.  

Political promises. But they're good ideas. I'm not happy with Bill Gates cheating on his wife. I'm still going to use a computer that uses windows .Don't throw away good ideas just because of who said them. I remember a story about a President visiting a General. He said my wife made you some fudge, gave the general the fudge, then told him he was fired.I

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4 hours ago, Marysara1 said:

Political promises. But they're good ideas. I'm not happy with Bill Gates cheating on his wife. I'm still going to use a computer that uses windows .Don't throw away good ideas just because of who said them. I remember a story about a President visiting a General. He said my wife made you some fudge, gave the general the fudge, then told him he was fired.I

What I responded to was your post about Donald Trump defining Trumpism.  HE said these things, and was LYING as he said them.  In this case, yes it definitely makes a difference who said them, because great ideas or not, Trumpism is based on lies.  You and others were suckered into voting for him on his promises of lies.  

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