Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

BOGART, SYDNEY GREENSTREET AND ALEXIS SMITH BRING SUSPENSE IN "CONFLICT"


Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, TopBilled said:

I never said Winters' role in A PLACE IN THE SUN was offered to Crawford or Hepburn.

But Winters carved out a niche for herself that would not have been possible if the bigger name actresses had sought those parts for themselves. After all, they had more box office clout in their heyday.

I am sure Crawford would have done fine with something like WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH HELEN, opposite Debbie Reynolds. By the early 70s, Crawford's movie career was in decline while Winters was able to continue in character roles.

Another issue here is that a lot of the old-time lead actresses were afraid to transition into character parts. 

Going back to Rose Hobart, she was essentially transitioning into supporting roles and character parts in the mid-40s. But in the early 30s, she was a star. Mae Clarke is another one who went from star to character actress. 

Note the lol.  Maybe a smiley face would have been better?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I couldn't recall if I had  seen  this one or not. The plot sounded  somewhat familiar. About ten minutes into it I  realized I had seen it

before, though it was a number of years ago. Not bad, but not very special either. I doubt Bogie would have been convicted if he

hadn't confessed, as  the  evidence against him is pretty threadbare. And it's hard  to believe that the cops  would go to all that

trouble  just on the say so of Greenstreet. And  though Bogie wasn't  his patient, I wonder about  the ethics  of Greenstreet

getting so involved with the  case, as if he's  an honorary sheriff.  

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Crawford does not die at the end of BABY JANE.

Per the AFI synopsis:

Jane drags Blanche into a car and drives to a nearby beach. There Blanche confesses that she had arranged the automobile accident and had intended to kill her sister to avenge herself for the years of humiliation she had spent in the shadow of Baby Jane. As the police arrive upon the scene, the now totally deranged Jane goes into her song-and-dance routine of long ago.

She says to Jane:  "I don't have much time", so I think it's implied she's dying?   

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

I watched parts of Conflict last night.   (I have seen it many times):

What I noticed was how Greenstreet was often filmed in a manner similar to his first film,  The Maltese Falcon:   a shot that starts out from the floor pointing up that makes the actor dominate the shot.

 

Greenstreet's films almost always mention his weight, usually in a "light"-hearted way, lol.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Do you mean emotional resignation (for lack of a better phrase)...?

In THEY ALL KISSED THE BRIDE (1942), she has to resign herself to married life with Melvyn Douglas and give up her successful career as a business executive.

I meant "die" in a showbiz sense.  ;)  You know, like a performer's act would "die" on the vaudeville  stage or even on Broadway? 

Y'know, Joan, like many others in her working range of time, weren't always the "great" actors or actresses some of us would like to believe.   And of course, I'm sure you know that many of your favorites, as well as mine, have sometimes "laid an egg".  B)

Sepiatone

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Sepiatone said:

I meant "die" in a showbiz sense.  ;)  You know, like a performer's act would "die" on the vaudeville  stage or even on Broadway? 

Y'know, Joan, like many others in her working range of time, weren't always the "great" actors or actresses some of us would like to believe.   And of course, I'm sure you know that many of your favorites, as well as mine, have sometimes "laid an egg".  B)

Sepiatone

Even in her more questionable roles (TORCH SONG comes to mind) she still makes a valiant effort.

The film where I really felt she was out of her depth was SUSAN AND GOD (1940). The first hour of it, I just felt the material was too complex for her, but then halfway into the picture, she won me over. She has a way of somehow making things work.

SUDDEN FEAR is still my most favorite performance of hers. She elevates every single cliche and I love the way the rest of the cast have this sort of tense, edgy relationship with her.

Screen Shot 2019-10-12 at 9.25.22 AM.jpeg

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Is this a "Conflict" thread or a Joan Crawford thread?   Don't get me wrong,  I like Joan Crawford and I think talking about her is fun.  And I also don't mind , usually,  when threads go off-topic a bit.  I've done more than my share of thread-topic wandering,  going off on a tangent, etc.

But when the original topic of the thread gets up-staged by a new topic, and there are way more posts about the tangential topic than the original one,   that's when I can't get with the program.  If a thread is long-standing and more or less established,  it doesn't matter so much.  But when it's a brand-new thread and only gets a few measly posts about the topic, while everyone rushes to discuss some side-issue,  I start to feel kind of sorry for the thread.

I mean,  Joan Crawford had nothing to do with the film Conflict.   So she was under consideration to play Humphrey Bogart's wife,  and turned it down. That's the extent of the connection.

Hey, after all this lecturing,  I can't resist saying, I just saw a latter-day Joan horror flick,  William Castle's Strait- Jacket.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

So let's see . . . I sense CONFLICT on a thread about CONFLICT! 

I CAN DIG IT!  (In fact, I bought a shovel!).

Is there a connection to be found between CONFLICT (1945) and Joan Crawford's last movie TROG (1970)?  Well, shucks, I don't know. 

I can tell you Alexis Smith dies in the 1976 suspense movie THE LITTLE GIRL WHO LIVES DOWN THE LANE . . . and what, you say, does that have to do with "Conflict"?   I have NO IDEA!  😵😜

(I admit my mind is a little bit 'off' today → I discovered my artificial flowers died last night.  🥀🥀  My plastic posies had bit the dust!  They were all droopy this morning . . . ).   JEEZ! 

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way,  it doesn't appear that the original poster herself has a problem with the topic veering into Crawford territory,  so if she doesn't mind,  I guess I shouldn't. B)

But,  I did want to share a few thoughts about Conflict.  Looks like jamesjazzguitar beat me to it,  he too thought of The Two Mrs. Carrolls.  I think Conflict  and The Two Mrs. Carrolls would make a great double feature on TCM  ( or anywhere for that matter.)   Both films star Humphrey Bogart, and in an atypical role, ie, a murderer.  And not just any murderer,  one who wants to off his wife.  True, there are a lot of differences,  probably the main one being that in The Two Mrs. Carrolls the second Mrs. Carroll survives.  And the idea of Bogart's character in the latter film being an artist and seeking inspiration for his work from the woman in his life,  that's kind of an original (albeit creepy) concept, nothing so interesting in Conflict, where it seems he merely lusts after his wife's younger sister,  much more cliched situation.

Actually I think TCM has shown these two films back -to-back.  Of course,  Stanwyck makes a much more engaging and sympathetic wife than whoever played the wife in Conflict.  Ok,  I looked her up: Rose Hobart. I've seen a lot of old movies,  and I'm not familiar with her at all.  I looked up Rose Hobart's filmography, and a quick scan revealed a lot of films,  and I don't think I've seen any of them.   ( Maybe I was too busy watching Joan Crawford movies😐. )

Bogie does not often play a murderer  - I'm not talking about all his gangster roles before he became a big star.  So these two titles are worth checking out if only for that - to see Humphrey Bogart playing such unsympathetic, malevolent men.  ( You can't count In a Lonely Place, his character is much more nuanced in that.  Plus,  as we who've seen it know,  he is NOT a murderer in that film.)

 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/4/2021 at 1:05 PM, TopBilled said:

So I guess she dies in two of her films-- HUMORESQUE and I SAW WHAT YOU DID.

She also dies in Queen Bee (unintentional car crash), and in The Story of Esther Costello (intentional, suicidal car crash).

Plus, there's a dream sequence in Sudden Fear where she dies in yet another car crash.

(With our apologies to Miss Wonderly for briefly dragging the thread back to this side topic, we now return you to your regularly scheduled programming.)  

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

I mean,  Joan Crawford had nothing to do with the film Conflict.

I can't really agree with your statement, MissW. Anytime I see Joan Crawford there's always conflict.

It's been a while since I saw Conflict, a film I recall generally enjoying. Seeing Greenstreet play cat and mouse with Bogart on the receiving/losing end is interesting if only because it's different. And I find it further interesting that with Bogart, having just recently become Warners' biggest male superstar as a romantic leading man in Casablanca (after years of toiling in supporting roles, often playing  a hood)  the studio was willing to experiment so soon with his newly acquired image by casting him as a wife murderer in Conflict as well as The Two Mrs. Carrolls soon afterward.

Seeing Bogart's gradual nerve breakdown as he gets spooked by the possibility his wife is still alive in Conflict is interesting. As opposed to the psychopath he plays in Two Mrs. Carrolls with the usually laid back actor's over-the-top histrionics at the film's climax a bit embarrassing to me. There's some face twitching in his paranoia in Carrolls that gets my nomination as Bogie's worst performance during his prime years as a Warners star.

Of course, he would soon be experimenting with his screen image again in Dark Passage, as a man on the run who is anything but "cool" and needs the help of anybody and everybody, from Lauren Bacall to a plastic surgeon to a cab driver, to try to extricate himself from a murder conviction (which, in fact, doesn't happen, as it turns out). Soon after that came further, and far more convincing, explorations of playing psychotics for the actor in Treasure of the Sierra Madre and In A Lonely Place, two of his best performances. When Bogart had good directors and scripts, as in these two films, he flourished as a performer. That was not the case in The Two Mrs. Carrolls in which I feel he flounders as an actor.

 

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Both Conflict and The Two Mrs. Carrolls feature Alexis Smith as Bogie's love interest,  with the major difference that in Conflict her character isn't in love with Bogie's character.

Note that Patrick O'Moore is also in both films.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw this post so I thought I'd watch "Conflict" - I recorded it.  Thanks for spotlighting it.  It was a great film.  Very suspenseful with lots of interesting twists and turns.  I did not predict the ending!  I was so surprised to see Bogart play a character like this.  He portrays a character that seems really unhappy with his marriage with a very difficult wife but I still wanted him to get caught.

Sydney Greenstreet has an interesting accent that I can't identify.  I think he's a wonderful actor.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...