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FILM NOIR IN COLOR? "NIAGARA" 1953


lilypond
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19 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Leave Her to Heaven came to my mind before I even read the part in your post where you name it.

Ditto.

Style is a big part of NOIR for me, B&W not necessary but I always think of B&W D.O.A. with it's untypical bright sunlit shots (and the RAT way overdressed for a HEAT WAVE... even a SCARF!!  Cheez and crackers!)  That all said, story content is paramount in any NOIR for me.  It needs a turn to dark and evil. 

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1 hour ago, brianNH said:

I think I'm going to have to start a Max Showalter fan club, even if I'm the only one who'll show up at the meetings.  Poor guy can't catch a break around here.

I'll show up. I appreciate him as a character actor. He did a lot of good guest-starring work on television in the 1960s.

A week ago, I was looking at some Paramount films on Hulu. They had just added RACING WITH THE MOON (1984) which features Sean Penn and Nicolas Cage in early roles. A scene at the beginning of the movie has Sean Penn taking piano lessons and his piano teacher is played by Max Showalter. Even in advanced age, he's still very recognizable.

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4 hours ago, lilypond said:

 TOPBILLED,  thanks, the only one of those I'm familiar with is "House of Bamboo".    I like Victor Mature and think he was a good fit for noir.

Yes, Victor Mature is an interesting actor.

Of the four I mentioned, I'd say LISBON is the best. Claude Rains gives an excellent performance. And Maureen O'Hara seems to be having a great time with her role as a dangerous woman. She wrote in her memoirs, and I am paraphrasing: 'Bette Davis was right...playing a b*tch is a lot of fun!'

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On 11/18/2021 at 9:43 PM, TomJH said:

More colour noir: Desert Fury. Burt Lancaster in a supporting role in his first film role, partially shot on location in Arizona, with Lizabeth Scott and John Hodiak, among others. Not a great film but okay, with vibrant Technicolor of those desert scenes. To be honest I didn't pick up on the gay subtext to which some critics have referred but I can understand what they're talking about.

Just realized recently this is out on DVD, so it's on my list for Santa. Can't wait and I'm hoping it's a good print. The gay subtext comes out obliquely (naturally). When Lizabeth Scott asks how Wendell Corey and John Hodiak met, they tell her it was late at night in an all-night diner in New York. Corey was broke and strung out so Hodiak bought him a meal and "took him home" and they'd been together ever since. When she comes to their current home Hodiak gives her a tour and we see the one unmade bed in the background. And every time Scott's around Corey is tense and on high alert, always hovering and butting in when Hodiak shows an interest in her. At one point Corey basically tells her that the two of them are doing just fine so butt out. He and Hodiak have big plans (I forget what exactly) so when Hodiak starts talking about hanging around for Scott, it sets Corey off big time. The gay vibe is definitely hanging in the air and I assume it must have been put there intentionally. Incidentally, I think Mary Astor gives one of her best performances in this. 

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

Heh, I was fascinated by her clear lucite PURSE!

Elegant-Vintage-Clear-Lucite-Lace-Purse-

(been collecting them for 40 years)

I wonder if you're the only viewer to ever notice her purse in that scene, TikiSoo. There was too much Marilyn going on there for me to see anything else.

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4 minutes ago, lilypond said:

I meant to mention "Inferno" and forgot.   Flame-haired Rhonda Fleming and William Lundigan and the torrid desert--  made for living color.

 

post-269895-0-11609400-1408476927.jpg

My Mom knew William Lundigan & just talked about seeing him regularly at my Grandfather's store. She said he was incredibly handsome in person & had a gorgeous voice. He was on local radio for years before going to Hollywood. I'm now trying to see all his movies.

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23 hours ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

 

Of course there are B&W noirs that also feature such outdoor scenes;    Take Out of the Past:  What if the film was shot like the Wizard of Oz?    The Sierra Nevada scenes in color while the San Francisco scenes are in B&W?

 

But(pardon*ahem*)  in WIZARD it was color, but began and ended in( *ahem* again) SEPIA TONE! ;) 

Sepiatone

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Wow, TIKISOO, how fabulous that your mother knew William Lundigan!  I can well imagine that he was spectacular in person.  I've liked him in everything I've seen him in--   the aforementioned "Inferno",   in "Love Nest",   and in "The House on Telegraph Hill".    He has that interestingly flawed, all-American quality, reminiscent somewhat of Dennis O'Keefe,  I think...

Apropos of your comment, SEPIATONE,  your screen name is the best.  Sepia tone is one of my favorite "colors",   especially for vintage photographs.   I've got a few old sepia family photos framed and sitting around, fading nicely from their original black and white...

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How interesting, TOPBILLED--  I didn't realize that Lundigan and O'Keefe had ever appeared together!   Because of their similar vibe, (to me at least), I could almost see them plausibly playing brothers in a film.  But am going to guess in the one you reference they were vying for Hedy Lamarr's  favors..... 

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Hadn't seen this in years and forgot just how much I enjoy this movie.  

Interesting to me, the dynamic between the Jean Peters and Max Showalter characters.  It's a dynamic that is still going strong in sitcoms -- the buffoonish/loutish husband and the smart, cool, sexy wife -- that leaves viewers wondering how someone like him ever managed to land someone like her.

Also interesting is that the same dynamic exists between Don Wilson and our friend Lurene Tuttle.  Are the Ketterings who the Cutlers are destined to become?  And could the same be said of the Loomises?  Could Ray end up like George if he doesn't realize that shredded wheat isn't nearly as delectable a dish as Polly?

By the way, enjoying all these posts about Technicolor noir.  Great recommendations for future viewings.  Thank you!

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2 hours ago, lilypond said:

How interesting, TOPBILLED--  I didn't realize that Lundigan and O'Keefe had ever appeared together!   Because of their similar vibe, (to me at least), I could almost see them plausibly playing brothers in a film.  But am going to guess in the one you reference they were vying for Hedy Lamarr's  favors..... 

They're not brothers in DISHONORED LADY. In fact it probably weakens the film that they are so similar and both vying for Hedy's attention. But together they are a stark contrast to John Loder (Hedy's real-life husband) who is also added into the mix.

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1 hour ago, PhillyCinephile said:

Hadn't seen this in years and forgot just how much I enjoy this movie.  

Interesting to me, the dynamic between the Jean Peters and Max Showalter characters.  It's a dynamic that is still going strong in sitcoms -- the buffoonish/loutish husband and the smart, cool, sexy wife -- that leaves viewers wondering how someone like him ever managed to land someone like her.

 

I remember thinking that too, and mused that she probably lost a bet.  ;) 

And to go against the grain here( and what might cause shock and dismay in some) I often think this movie was director HENRY HATHAWAY's attempt to emulate HITCHCOCK.   All it needed was a BERNARD HERRMANN  score.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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11 minutes ago, uncle charlie said:

I'm a native of Niagara Falls, NY and have lived here most of my life. What strikes me most about "Niagara" is that most of the actual locations used in the film look the same almost 70 years later. 

I was wondering about the edges of the falls. Don't those degrade over time because of the force of the rushing water? Aren't the falls- in effect- receding?

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I think the character of George Loomis is Joseph Cotten's greatest performance.   He brings so much genuine human emotion to that role, and yet is always a very subtle actor.  Terrific and memorable as Uncle Charlie in SHADOW OF A DOUBT but people always seem to forget about NIAGARA.

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Yes, about 3 feet per year. I don't recall a shot of Terrapin Point in relation to the brink of the Horseshoe Falls (where the boat went over) in the film. I was referring more to the location shots of the bell tower, Table Rock and the Cave of the Winds (which need to be rebuilt each spring but always look the same). The cabin site is obviously a set, not a real existing location. Based on the view of the falls from there, those cabins would be in the middle of River Road in Niagara Falls, Ontario. 

I was not alive when this was filmed but from what I've heard and read, it was a huge deal to have Marilyn Monroe in Niagara Falls, Especially when she was visited by her new boyfriend - Joe DiMaggio.

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31 minutes ago, uncle charlie said:

I'm a native of Niagara Falls, NY and have lived here most of my life. What strikes me most about "Niagara" is that most of the actual locations used in the film look the same almost 70 years later. 

Good to know.  My parents took my sister and me to Niagara Falls back in the 1970s.  We saw Richard Boone filming a made-for-TV movie during our visit.  I'm hoping to visit again at some point.

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6 hours ago, lilypond said:

How interesting, TOPBILLED--  I didn't realize that Lundigan and O'Keefe had ever appeared together!   Because of their similar vibe, (to me at least), I could almost see them plausibly playing brothers in a film.  But am going to guess in the one you reference they were vying for Hedy Lamarr's  favors..... 

I used to confuse them but then realized it was Dennis O'Keefe who always annoyed me.

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