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January 2022 schedule is here


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I'm glad to see they're showing Bertrand Tavernier"s My Journey Through French Cinema again. It's long but it's a great overview. I'm ashamed to say the thing which interested me the most was Rock 'n' Roll High School (1979). I've never seen it (and will probably wish I hadn't) but I love the Ramones' song and their goofy spirit in general. (Was there a better anthem for the 70's than I Wanna Be Sedated?) And a smallish Paul Newman day, even though most of it has been shown within the past year.

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2 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

Still running Torchy Blane on Saturdays? Gad, how many of those did they make? I wish they'd swap these movies about and not run the entire series in a row.

Not a fan of Glenda Farrell? 

When she was Star of the Month a few years ago, they devoted an entire evening to Torchy.

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This thread gives me a welcome respite from the rest of General Discussions where a lot of poisonous language is being used. Let me just say you can't posit yourself as a champion of universal truths that are being suppressed by a pseudointellectual elite when your rhetoric consists entirely of sneering, scoffing, scornful derision, insulting, belittling and besmirching of everyone who has a different opinion than you. Thought that went on only in Off-Topic Chit-Chat, but here it is.  I'm going to get away from there for a while.

January 1 must be a Saturday. It's Saturday matinee in the morning.  There are Pete Smith shorts, travel-ramas, a collection of MGM previews hosted by Lionel Barrymore, an MGM comedy short about placing a hex with Mary Wickes and Red Skelton,  a Popeye cartoon and a chapter of a Batman serial. I'm only listing the features.

Bowery Buckaroos (Leo Gorcey, Huntz Hall) (Monogram, 1947)
Rustlers (Tim Holt, Richard Martin) (RKO, 1949)

Afternoon is a random hodegepodge of movies that are connected only by being very famous, I think.

Twelve O'Clock High (Gregory Peck, Hugh Marlowe) (20th Century Fox, 1949)
A Face in the Crowd (Andy Griffith, Patricia Neal) (Warner Bros., 1957)
Fiddler on the Roof (Topol, Norma Crane) (United Artists, 1971)
 

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Primetime December 1 I don't know what the theme is, because only one movie airing is made known to us. I hope this isn't going to be like December, where the schedule had dozens of gaps. I still don't think I know 20 or 30% of the movies that are airing in December. Anyway, what we have is:

Penny Serenade (Cary Grant, Irene Dunne) (Columbia, 1941)

Noir Alley

Repeat Performance (Louis Hayward, Joan Leslie) (Eagle-Lion, 1947)

This is definitely a repeat performance, as I distinctly remember watching the memorable opening sequence of this film on Noir Alley in my parents' house during a previous holiday season, perhaps two years ago. I'm curious if Eddie Muller will record a new intro/outro, of if they'll just air the previous one.

The rest of the night is Judy Holliday movies with one exception.

Old Acquaintance (Bette Davis, Miriam Hopkins) (Warner Bros., 1943)
Adam's Rib (Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn) (MGM, 1949)
Born Yesterday (Judy Holliday, Broderick Crawford) (Columbia, 1950)
It Should Happen to You (Judy Holliday, Peter Lawford) (Columbia, 1953)

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Daytime January 2 after the ... um ... repeat performance of Noir Alley, I'm not sure what the theme is. They all have romances in them, some more than others. But it could just be a random Sunday.

Romeo and Juliet (Norma Shearer, Leslie Howard) (MGM, 1937)
The More the Merrier (Jean Arthur, Joel McCrea) (Columbia, 1943)
Light in the Piazza (Olivia DeHavilland, Yvette Mimieux) (MGM, 1962)
My Favorite Year (Peter O'Toole, Mark Lin-Baker) (MGM, 1982)

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1 hour ago, sewhite2000 said:

Primetime December 1 I don't know what the theme is, because only one movie airing is made known to us. I hope this isn't going to be like December, where the schedule had dozens of gaps. I still don't think I know 20 or 30% of the movies that are airing in December. Anyway, what we have is:

Penny Serenade (Cary Grant, Irene Dunne) (Columbia, 1941)

Noir Alley

Repeat Performance (Louis Hayward, Joan Leslie) (Eagle-Lion, 1947)

This is definitely a repeat performance, as I distinctly remember watching the memorable opening sequence of this film on Noir Alley in my parents' house during a previous holiday season, perhaps two years ago. I'm curious if Eddie Muller will record a new intro/outro, of if they'll just air the previous one.

The rest of the night is Judy Holliday movies with one exception.

Old Acquaintance (Bette Davis, Miriam Hopkins) (Warner Bros., 1943)
Adam's Rib (Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn) (MGM, 1949)
Born Yesterday (Judy Holliday, Broderick Crawford) (Columbia, 1950)
It Should Happen to You (Judy Holliday, Peter Lawford) (Columbia, 1953)

The Film Noir Foundation's restoration of Repeat Performance is being released on blu ray on the boutique label, Flicker Alley in January.  Perhaps that is why they're repeating this film?

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Primetime January 2 It's movies with "green" in the title, though MGM's The Green Years is absent.

How Green Was My Valley (Maureen O'Hara, Walter Pidgeon) (20th Century Fox, 1941)
The Corn is Green (Bette Davis, John Dall) (Warner Bros., 1945)

Silent Sunday Nights
The Three Musketeers (Douglas Fairbanks, Nigel de Brulier) (United Artists, 1921)

TCM Imports A couple of French documentaries
A Letter from Siberia (George Roquies) (Dist. in the US by New Yorker Films, 1970)
My Journey through French Cinema (Bertrand Tavernier, Francois Truffaut) (Dist. in the US by Cohen Media Group, 2016)

 

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21 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Not a fan of Glenda Farrell? 

When she was Star of the Month a few years ago, they devoted an entire evening to Torchy.

Yes, I'm a fan of Glenda Farrell, but I would still like to see the Saturday morning movie with a different star each week. Mix it up a little, I say.

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29 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

Yes, I'm a fan of Glenda Farrell, but I would still like to see the Saturday morning movie with a different star each week. Mix it up a little, I say.

There was one year when they ran through all the Bowery Boys films from Monogram. There are 48 of them, so it took almost a whole year of Saturdays to get through them! In fact I think it did take a year, because four Saturdays they were pre-empted for 31 Days of Oscar. So it stretched out over 52 weeks. It was practically unending.

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Kay Francis is the highlight for me.  I'm also pleased that The Young Philadelphians (my favorite Paul Newman movie) will be shown. I had to replace my cable box, so I lost my TIVO'd movies. Glad about  Putney Swope as well.

 

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, TopBilled said:

There was one year when they ran through all the Bowery Boys films from Monogram. There are 48 of them, so it took almost a whole year of Saturdays to get through them! In fact I think it did take a year, because four Saturdays they were pre-empted for 31 Days of Oscar. So it stretched out over 52 weeks. It was practically unending.

I remember that. I'm a huge fan of the Bowery Boys, but believe me, after that year I'd had enough!

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4 hours ago, Swithin said:

Kay Francis is the highlight for me.  I'm also pleased that The Young Philadelphians (my favorite Paul Newman movie) will be shown. I had to replace my cable box, so I lost my TIVO'd movies. Glad about  Putney Swope as well.

I'm looking forward to January as well.  Love Kay and The Young Philadelphians may be my favorite Paul Newman film as well.  

 

 

 

 

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Had a long absence while dealing with work then holiday travel. I'm back!

Daytime January 3 It's movies set in cold, desolate places. Could be they're all set specifically in  the Arctic. My knoweldge of geography isn't so strong.  Note: I honestly don't know about Letter from Siberia, which airs right during the topic shift. I listed it as part of a TCM Imports doocumentary double feature, but it could also be the first movie in this set.

Nanook of the North (Allakriallak, Alice Nevalinga) (Pathe, 1922)
The Gold Rush (Charles Chaplin, Mack Swain) (United Artists, 1925)
Arctic Fury (Alfred Delcambre, Eve Miller) (RKO, 1949)
The Thing from Another World (Kenneth Tobey, Margaret Sheridan) (RKO, 1951)
A Night to Remember (Kenneth Moore, Ronald Allen) Dist. n the US by Rank Film Distributors of America, 1958)
The Ballad of Narayama (Kinuyo Tanaka, Teiji Takahashi) (Dist.. in the US by Films Around the World, 1961)
The Ascent (Boris Plotnikov, Vladimir Gostyukhin) (Dist. in the US by the Criterion Collection, 2008)
 

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Primetime January 3 and continuing on through midday January 4 Night One of Kay Francis as Star of the Month. Looks like the first night is romantic comedies. There's a gap in programming in which at least two short-running time films from the '30s could be plugged in. I hope TCM is negotiating to fill the slots with some more Francis movies outside of the TCM Library. They are showing one from Universal already.

Jewel Robbery (William Powell, Kay Francis) (Warner Bros., 1932)
The Goose and the Gander (Kay Francis, George Brent ) (Warner Bros., 1935)
First Lady (Kay Francis, Preston Foster) (Warner Bros., 1937)
Comet over Broadway (Kay Francis, Ian Hunter) (Warner Bros., 1938)
Secrets of an Actress (Kay Francis, George Brent) (Warner Bros., 1938)
Women are Like That (Kay Francis, Pat O'Brien) (Warner Bros., 1938)
It's a Date (Deanna Durbin, Kay Francis) (Universal. 1940)
The Feminine Touch (Rosalind Russell, Don Ameche) (MGM, 1941)
Play Girl (Kay Francis, James Ellison) (RKO, 1941)
Always in My Heart (Kay Francis, Walter Huston) (Warner Bros., 1942)
 

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Primetime January 4 The theme could be satires? There's a gap in the programming in the middle of the schedule, so it's hard for me to guess.

Dr. Strangelove (Peter Sellers, George C. Scott) (Columbia, 1964)
This is Spinal Tap (Michael McKean, Christopher Guest) (Embassy, 1984)

Late night, I have no idea. Seems pretty random.

Broadway Melody of 1936 (Eleanor Powell, Robert Taylor) (MGM,  1935)
A Streetcar Named Desire (Vivien Leigh, Marlon Brando) (Warner Bros., 1951)
The Incredible Mr. Limpet (Don Knotts, Carole Cook) (Warner Bros., 1964)

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