Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Winter Themed Movies


Recommended Posts

Looking for winter themed (but not really Christmas) classic films.

I've thought of these:

Northern Pursuit 1943

The White Tower 1950

The Far Country 1954

The Double Man 1967

I know there must be many.  Please suggest any that you think of.

Thanks!

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, wunderlong88 said:

Looking for winter themed (but not really Christmas) classic films.

I've thought of these:

Northern Pursuit 1943

The White Tower 1950

The Far Country 1954

The Double Man 1967

I know there must be many.  Please suggest any that you think of.

Thanks!

 

 I thought of a pair of Norma Shearer films: IDIOT'S DELIGHT (1939) and ESCAPE (1940)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, wunderlong88 said:

Re: "Looking for winter themed (but not really Christmas) classic films.

I've thought of these...

I know there must be many.  Please suggest any that you think of."

 1969 ski resort conflict: DOWNHILL RACER and "On Her Majesty's Secret Service"

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, NoShear said:

 Re: "1969 ski resort conflict: DOWNHILL RACER and "On Her Majesty's Secret Service""

 Lynn-Holly Johnson: ICE CASTLES (1978) and FOR YOUR EYES ONLY (1981)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It Happened on Fifth Avenue (1947) has a winter theme as they take advantage of the fact that the rich escape to warmer climes during the winter.

June Bride (1948) might be said to have a winter theme as the magazine needed all photographs taken and the article prepared during winter months so that it would be ready for printing in the spring. Winter is the season for cider also and it is when Robert Montgomery learns that an apple can bite back.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Dargo said:

The Fatal Glass of Beer (1933)

Here's ya a short sample...

 

 I thought of a ski lodge warning here, Dargo: I don't suppose it would've done any good to have reminded W. C. Fields that the combo of cold and drink is not recommended!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, rjbartrop said:

Quintet (1979)

Snowpiercer (2013).  This one is pretty much about permanent winter

Snowpiercer, = Phenominal (if not just about Transcendental). Also, (and im Not sore upon this); one less that i'll haveto add.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, rjbartrop said:

Quintet (1979)

Snowpiercer (2013).  This one is pretty much about permanent winter

*Apologies for this Dumb Pathetic, Idiotic Double Post Here. 😑🥴. The, keyboard im using at momnt seems to be jacking up pretty badly and i have No Clue. How to Delete* 😑😑😑🙄😑😤🥴.

Snowpiercer, = Phenominal (if not just about Transcendental). Also, (and im Not sore upon this); one less that i'll haveto add.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(No Particular Order for these.)

Ten Little Indians. (Madam Eaton and Hugh)

Cold War.

Slalom.

Duelyant. (The Duelist)

Cloud Atlas.

Blade Runner 2049.

White Bird In A Blizzard.

2 Lovers & A Bear.

*Honorable Mention; Womb and Aloft.

 

My Two.. (Much) More Unorthodox, Nefarious christmas time favorites would be Better Watch Out and Black Christmas (of '74.).

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 
 
 
Winter Meeting from 1948 with Bette Davis, Jim Davis and John Hoyt.
 
It takes place in the winter and uses the season as a metaphor, but it's not an overly "wintery" movie. It's also reasonably boring.
 
My comments on it below:
 
At some point, actors become too old for certain roles, but usually, stars overstay their welcome in the type of character that has propelled them to fame. Also, movies need to be about something, which is usually a conflict between ideas, people or events. 
 
In Winter Meeting, we see Bette Davis having overstayed her welcome in the role of the young, smart, pretty socialite, in this case, with an aversion to marriage. The young-socialite role is one she played many, many times in her twenties and thirties, but now, in her early forties, it's forced and not believable.
 
Here she plays a wealthy Manhattan dilettante poetess (it's nice to have a substantial trust fund behind you) who, at the end of the war, meets a moody and aloof WWII naval hero, Jim Davis. Instead of acknowledging their age difference, we are just supposed to accept Ms. Davis as a woman in her twenties. She might be the best movie actress ever, but even she can't act twenty years off her real age. 
 
Even putting that aside, we are left with a movie without much story or conflict. Moody Jim Davis and hesitant-to-love Bette Davis, in theory, are too angsty soles who find comfort in each other, but their love affair struggles to take flight owing to some unknown internal conflict each has. 
 
The bulk of the movie is watching each lead try to draw the past secrets out of the other so that they can overcome their inner demons and embrace their new love affair. That effort takes way too long - extended kitchen conversations, a trip to a country house, exhausting fireside chats -  and then offers up challenges that are not dramatic. 
 
(Spoiler alerts) Bette Davis' wealthy, socially proper minister father married a working-class Irish Catholic girl, Davis' mother, who proceeds to have affairs and finally abandons him and Davis - the shame! Meanwhile, Jim Davis has struggled since he was a teenager with a desire to become a priest (I know, what!?, it comes out of nowhere), but an uncertainty if it is the right path for him. Additionally, he dislikes that his heroic war efforts are being used by the media and Washington for propaganda reasons. That's it, those are the two big secrets that torture these struggling lovers. 
 
Sure, there's a bit of a connection between Bette Davis' embarrassment over her Catholic mother's behavior and Jim Davis' desire to become a priest and, yes, he helps to minister her through her guilt and anger, but by now the movie has gone on for almost an hour and a half. And even then, the angst kinda continues and the resolution, I'll leave that for those who want to see it, is pat and unsatisfying. 
 
But there are two bright spots. One is the 1940's version of east-coast elitism on display throughout as Bette Davis and her snarky sophisticated friend, businessman John Hoyt, look down on all things not east-coast establishment and money, like the Midwest roots of war-hero Jim Davis. It's only hinted at here, but Hoyt's character, today, would loudly proclaim his homosexuality as he is, and there's no other word for it, ****ier than Davis is when looking down his elitist nose at everything from how someone holds a fork to who their parents are. Bette Davis and he have a friendship chemistry that, unfortunately, never develops between her and Jim Davis.
 
The other bright spot, and it's a very inside-baseball thing is Davis' voice and delivery. By this point in her career, she had perfected her acting voice: a subtler but as distinct a voice as Cary Grant's. Her diction and inflection are all her own as she constantly varies her speaking pace and cadence, from long pauses to rapid-fire delivery, all the while bringing her idiosyncratic pronunciation as words and vowels seem to go through some sort of high-brow nasal filter before coming out. The result is an incredible ability to project complex emotions - and condescension - with nothing more than the delivery of a few words and a look to match.
 
Unfortunately, neither Hoyt's performance nor Davis's voice are enough to wake up this sleepy effort where Bette Davis is too old for the role and the conflicts too mild to carry nearly two hours of movie. 
  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, mkahn22 said:
 
279258-8d0a46bd54d3afcd8f943fd73fcb75f1.jpg.f9e465dd8db7b18ebabeb0e72c6331f4.jpg
 
Winter Meeting from 1948 with Bette Davis, Jim Davis and John Hoyt.
 
It takes place in the winter and uses the season as a metaphor, but it's not an overly "wintery" movie. It's also reasonably boring.
 
My comments on it below:
 
At some point, actors become too old for certain roles, but usually, stars overstay their welcome in the type of character that has propelled them to fame. Also, movies need to be about something, which is usually a conflict between ideas, people or events. 
 
In Winter Meeting, we see Bette Davis having overstayed her welcome in the role of the young, smart, pretty socialite, in this case, with an aversion to marriage. The young-socialite role is one she played many, many times in her twenties and thirties, but now, in her early forties, it's forced and not believable.
 
Here she plays a wealthy Manhattan dilettante poetess (it's nice to have a substantial trust fund behind you) who, at the end of the war, meets a moody and aloof WWII naval hero, Jim Davis. Instead of acknowledging their age difference, we are just supposed to accept Ms. Davis as a woman in her twenties. She might be the best movie actress ever, but even she can't act twenty years off her real age. 
 
Even putting that aside, we are left with a movie without much story or conflict. Moody Jim Davis and hesitant-to-love Bette Davis, in theory, are too angsty soles who find comfort in each other, but their love affair struggles to take flight owing to some unknown internal conflict each has. 
 
The bulk of the movie is watching each lead try to draw the past secrets out of the other so that they can overcome their inner demons and embrace their new love affair. That effort takes way too long - extended kitchen conversations, a trip to a country house, exhausting fireside chats -  and then offers up challenges that are not dramatic. 
 
(Spoiler alerts) Bette Davis' wealthy, socially proper minister father married a working-class Irish Catholic girl, Davis' mother, who proceeds to have affairs and finally abandons him and Davis - the shame! Meanwhile, Jim Davis has struggled since he was a teenager with a desire to become a priest (I know, what!?, it comes out of nowhere), but an uncertainty if it is the right path for him. Additionally, he dislikes that his heroic war efforts are being used by the media and Washington for propaganda reasons. That's it, those are the two big secrets that torture these struggling lovers. 
 
Sure, there's a bit of a connection between Bette Davis' embarrassment over her Catholic mother's behavior and Jim Davis' desire to become a priest and, yes, he helps to minister her through her guilt and anger, but by now the movie has gone on for almost an hour and a half. And even then, the angst kinda continues and the resolution, I'll leave that for those who want to see it, is pat and unsatisfying. 
 
But there are two bright spots. One is the 1940's version of east-coast elitism on display throughout as Bette Davis and her snarky sophisticated friend, businessman John Hoyt, look down on all things not east-coast establishment and money, like the Midwest roots of war-hero Jim Davis. It's only hinted at here, but Hoyt's character, today, would loudly proclaim his homosexuality as he is, and there's no other word for it, ****ier than Davis is when looking down his elitist nose at everything from how someone holds a fork to who their parents are. Bette Davis and he have a friendship chemistry that, unfortunately, never develops between her and Jim Davis.
 
The other bright spot, and it's a very inside-baseball thing is Davis' voice and delivery. By this point in her career, she had perfected her acting voice: a subtler but as distinct a voice as Cary Grant's. Her diction and inflection are all her own as she constantly varies her speaking pace and cadence, from long pauses to rapid-fire delivery, all the while bringing her idiosyncratic pronunciation as words and vowels seem to go through some sort of high-brow nasal filter before coming out. The result is an incredible ability to project complex emotions - and condescension - with nothing more than the delivery of a few words and a look to match.
 
Unfortunately, neither Hoyt's performance nor Davis's voice are enough to wake up this sleepy effort where Bette Davis is too old for the role and the conflicts too mild to carry nearly two hours of movie. 

I only saw the end of this movie. Thanks for the review. What impressed me the most were the really awful haircuts Bette Davis and Jim Davis were sporting. Bette's can be seen clearly in the still you posted. It looks like Jim Davis is wearing a bad toupee, but maybe it's just a bad haircut.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, NoShear said:

 Another winter tragedy with Julie Christie: McCABE & Mrs. MILLER (1971)!

SPOILER ALERT:

Of course, there are two schools of thought about Warren Beatty being up to his neck in snow: 1) What a tragedy! 2) Not enough snow.

  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Gold Rush (1925) starring Charlie Chaplin.  I have a soft spot in my heart for Chaplin playing the Little Tramp.  In this story, he is a lone prospector who gets lost in a blizzard but ends up meeting his true love.  This film is humorous and poignant.

image.jpeg.262b77a1e2c3225942e3560f7a8f84dd.jpeg          The Gold Rush (1925) A Silent Film Review – Movies Silently        Montages: International Edition » Is Charlie Chaplin's The Gold Rush (1925)  modern?

Call of the Wild (1935) an adventure story with wintery scenes in Alaska starring Clark Gable and Loretta Young.  A good movie but not as good as Jack London's classic book "Call of the Wild".

🔥 Call of the Wild (1935) - IMDb        image.jpeg.0c4c4ea43f41656b7b69c52988e3d343.jpeg

Fargo (1996) made by the Cohen brothers is a crime story set in bleak wintery landscapes in the great plains.   This film is chilling with violence.

image.jpeg.8f6d6dcd819200e9940a53b08b29c234.jpeg      The Gruesome True Story That Inspired The Movie 'Fargo' - ToysMatrix      Fargo box set review – true to the anarchic spirit of the Coens' film |  Fargo | The Guardian

The Shining (1980) directed by Stanley Kubrick and starring Jack Nicholson.  A great psychological horror movie set in an isolated winter setting.

Things You Didn't Know About the Making of 'the Shining'     Kubrick's "The Shining" in 6 parts: The obsessively-controlled sequences  that unravel Jack's mind | Salon.com

 

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Two come to mind off the bat, Wunder. Very different movies:

wl1.jpg dh1.jpg

 

Winter Light (1963, Ingmar Bergman) & Downhill Racer (1969, Michael Ritchie)

The first deals with a priest in a small parish struggling with his faith and opening his heart to a devoted parishoner. The second deals with an athlete who attempts to replace the emptiness of his emotional life with professional acomplishment. Both main characters are in deep freeze, you might say, whose stories are captured beautifully by both directors and cinematographers (Sven Nykvist and Brian Probyn, respectively). Both are currently streaming on The Criterion Channel. Winter Light, also on YouTube.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...