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Bridget Jones's Diary


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It is literally over 20 years old, and those channels have no interest in a dinosaur like that. So, thank you TCM. Keep showing more of those old movies. Maybe just not so many with Renee Zellweger.

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I beg to differ. Though I don't recall which channel, Bridget Jones's Diary was playing on one of them within the past couple of weeks- Starz, Showtime or some other, I don't recall, but this film is aired not infrequently elsewhere, and I just don't see the point of having it on TCM.

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The list of actresses Alicia Malone mentioned pre-film who didn't win the role of Bridget was impressive. Passing over Toni Collette, though, was interesting. I think she would have been at least as good as Zellweger.

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I thought it was a valid and rather famous example of the theme of accents. As I recall, the Brits quite lost their minds over Zellwegger's casting in the film adaptation of a book they considered to be something of a national treasure. I distinctly remember reading articles back in the  day that portrayed seemingly the entire nation voicing their dipleasure over a Hollywood actress getting the job. Jump ahead 20 years ago, and American streaming shows are loaded with British actors doing American accents, which everyone simply seems to accept as "acting".

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"Accents"? Really?

Well gosh, yes, I guess I can see the rationale. After all, TCM rarely plays movies which contain people who have accents, and British accents are especially rare, aren't they?  In all of TCM's catalog, there are perhaps only four or five films in which people have British accents. Perhaps that estimate is too high. I cannot recall the last time I heard a British accent on TCM.

Wow

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The 1960 British movie CITY OF THE DEAD (aka:  "Horror Hotel") has a number of British actors affecting American accents as it takes place in the town of 'Whitewood, Massachusetts'. 

Just thought to mention that in passing. 

 

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Yes, it's always interesting to tune one's ear to people from other countries affecting an accent of one's native land.

When I first saw L.A. Confidential back in the 1990s, I had never heard of either Russell Crowe or Guy Pearce. I was floored to later find out they are Australians. I thought at that time and still do today, that these two actors nailed American accents as well as I've ever heard.

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32 minutes ago, Mr. Gorman said:

The 1960 British movie CITY OF THE DEAD (aka:  "Horror Hotel") has a number of British actors affecting American accents as it takes place in the town of 'Whitewood, Massachusetts'. 

Just thought to mention that in passing. 

 

I've worked a lot with British actors who play American roles; and have also worked with American actors who lament that it's rare that they play British roles.  Both groups seem to understand, though, that American accents have been much more prominent in the UK than British accents have been here, in years gone by, and have served as training grounds for British children.  American sitcoms appeared on UK television early on; UK sitcoms, featuring characters with UK accents, were not much of a feature on American television, apart from the Masterpiece Theatre-type programs.

In fact, when the popular UK kids series Teletubbies came to the U.S., it had to be dubbed with American accents. So there was not much exposure to British accents for American youth.

So the Brits tend to be better at playing American than Americans tend to be at playing Brits. 

I wish they would have used a British actor in the Robert Redford role in Out of Africa. Not every American actor is Meryl Streep!

 

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Even from region to region here in the U.S.  you can run into a wide variety of accents, yet they're all american.  The UK has a similar situation.  Plus, I wonder if at times the British have as much trouble understanding us as we do them.  And on this track, I've always been amused by this scene in European Vacation:

Sepiaton

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6 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Even from region to region here in the U.S.  you can run into a wide variety of accents, yet they're all american.  The UK has a similar situation.  Plus, I wonder if at times the British have as much trouble understanding us as we do them.  And on this track, I've always been amused by this scene in European Vacation:

Sepiaton

They have a hard time with extreme accents (like Cajun, or Gullah), just as Americans have a hard time with some of the more colorful British accents.

Charles Shaughnessy, it is said, received mail from UK viewers of the sitcom The Nanny assailing his "fake" British accent, and compared it unfavo(u)rably with the British accent of Daniel Davis.  The twist:  Davis is American (from Arkansas), and Shaughnessy is British.

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Just now, txfilmfan said:

They have a hard time with extreme accents (like Cajun, or Gullah), just as Americans have a hard time with some of the more colorful British accents.

Heck, American actors have trouble affecting a proper Cajun accent.

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I've seen Southern Comfort but it's been many years and I don't recall the role you mention. There is a film from 2006, Little Chenier. Chris Mulkey plays a police officer in the southern Louisiana bayou, and it hurts my ears to hear the Wisconsin-born Mulkey try to sound like a cajun.

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I admit to being a bit floored when I first found out that it was airing on TCM a few weeks ago. Made me feel prematurely older.... But I do like the film, and I do feel that Renee Zellweger was wonderful as usual. I only wish Hollywood had made better use of her between her two Oscar wins (although 2006's Miss potter where she played Beatrix Potter is a lovely film)

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@UNWATCHABLE:   If you've seen SOUTHERN COMFORT then you might search your memory banks and recall the Guardsmen take a bearded Cajun man prisoner and then 'Coach' (Alan Autry, who was still using his real name of 'Carlos Brown' in the credits) torches the Cajun's cabin before the rest of the Guardsmen can retrieve supplies from it.  BRION JAMES does not have a boatload of lines in "Southern Comfort" but if you see a few clips of the film you'll hear him shout "KILL HIM!" in a Cajun accent regards to Fred Ward's nasty character. 

Of course, you can also watch the shot-in-and-around New Orleans movies MARDI GRAS MASSACRE (1978) and CRYPT OF DARK SECRETS (1976) to hear an occasional Cajun accent or two!

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22 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

This guy is very good with American accents, and can shift between them quickly:

 

Sho' 'nuff(no pun intent).

Notice the difference in Southern accents from say, Georgia, to Mississippi.  Even my wife's ex, from Alabama called it "JORE-JAH"  while  Georgian ex president Jimmy Carter always said,  "JAW-Jah"  ;)   

And for years I worked with a black guy from Miss.  who, if you closed your eyes or looked away when he spoke, sounded all the world like ELVIS PRESLEY, also originally from Miss.  And my co-worker was from just two towns over from Tupelo, where Elvis was born.  And though I worked in a Detroit auto plant in the '70's, there were still plenty of Southern transplants working there as well.  And I quickly noticed there really wasn't just one Southern accent.  And of course, there's far more than one Northern accent.  

And far as I'm concerned, Rene could have done the BEST British accent by an American actress, and that movie (to me) would have STILL sucked.

Sepiatone

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14 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Sho' 'nuff(no pun intent).

Notice the difference in Southern accents from say, Georgia, to Mississippi.  Even my wife's ex, from Alabama called it "JORE-JAH"  while  Georgian ex president Jimmy Carter always said,  "JAW-Jah"  ;)   

And for years I worked with a black guy from Miss.  who, if you closed your eyes or looked away when he spoke, sounded all the world like ELVIS PRESLEY, also originally from Miss.  And my co-worker was from just two towns over from Tupelo, where Elvis was born.  And though I worked in a Detroit auto plant in the '70's, there were still plenty of Southern transplants working there as well.  And I quickly noticed there really wasn't just one Southern accent.  And of course, there's far more than one Northern accent.  

And far as I'm concerned, Rene could have done the BEST British accent by an American actress, and that movie (to me) would have STILL sucked.

Sepiatone

Completely Off Topic for this thread. But i've Gotta Ask of You.. Why Is that Funny Sepia. ?

Yup. I Sometimes type like i just came from a Theodore Giesel Convention. Thats Nothing New. But What makes that funny ?

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Took me a while to fathom your query, but are you referring to your ambiguous GEORGIE HARLOW thread?  Still making assumptions everyone might know who in hell you're referencing? 

It was the remark about some obscure movie being the "best war movie I've ever "scene"  (instead of "seen" )  which struck me funny.   And to paraphrase the old restaurant sign directed at employees;  "If you have time enough to lean, you have time enough to clean", I offer....

"If you have time enough to drivel, you have time enough to proofread."  ;) 

Sepiatone

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