Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Peter Bogdanovich Passed Away


 Share

Recommended Posts

A  sad loss I liked him, +his book 'Who the devil made it' is excellent and I highly recommend,he also made a great film description of Citizen Kane with Roger Ebert on the 2 dvd special edition. He loved classic Hollywood but his sentimental life took a lot of him I think...RIP

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bogdanovich loved Howard Hawks. So it was appropriate that in his nostalgic 1971 drama "The Last Picture Show," the final movie shown at the Royal Theater in Anarene, Texas was Hawks' 1948  Western "Red River."

 

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The 1984 romantic comedy "Irreconcilable Differences" starred Shelley Long and Ryan O'Neal as a Hollywood couple whose young daughter (played by Drew Barrymore) sued them for legal emancipation. Directed by Charles Shyer, who co-wrote the film with his then-wife Nancy Meyers, the picture was loosely based on Peter Bogdanovich's marriage to the Oscar-nominated art director Polly Platt (1939-2011). In the film, the director played by O'Neal left his wife for a young actress (Sharon Stone) he hoped to guide to major stardom.

See the source image

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bogdanovich was a director I put in the same category with Quentin Tarantino, Joe Dante, the current John Landis, and...some of Martin Scorsese, as "Directors you would rather spend two fascinating hours listening to them talk ABOUT great movies, than watching the mediocre movies they make by themselves".

That's pretty much where Bogdanovich was coming from, in that the only movies of his I liked were What's Up, Doc? (1972), a movie about "Bringing Up Baby", The Cat's Meow (2001), a movie about the Citizen Kane guy, and Paper Moon (1974), a movie from the Nixon-era 70's where everything was about con artists surviving the 30's Depression, and we lumped it into salutes to "old 30's Hollywood".

I haven't yet seen Targets (1968), though, the one about how our troubled 60's gun-toting loners were scarier than Boris Karloff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, jakeem said:

Bogdanovich loved Howard Hawks. So it was appropriate that in his nostalgic 1971 drama "The Last Picture Show," the final movie shown at the Royal Theater in Anarene, Texas was Hawks' 1948  Western "Red River."

In McMurtry's novel, the last movie was The Kid From Texas, an Audie Murphy flick.

  • Thanks 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

He was best as a fan. But I love his first, TARGETS (not that it's a great film, but he coaxed Karloff into doing the film. Karloff was, as expected, brilliant), and THE LAST PICTURE SHOW.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, cinecrazydc said:

This is from his interview with Ben Mankiewicz at Club TCM at the 2017 TCM Classic Film Festival -

 

I was in the audience for this one.  A very entertaining discussion.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites


So sad to hear that Peter Bogdanovich has passed away.  That was a really great first season of The Plot Thickens with he and Ben.  I loved it.  He did great movies too.  I remember watching that night.  It was great.  I think it was before the Podcast started.  If I remember right?  They’ll probably pay tribute to him on here too.  It’s also so cool that he actually knew Cary Grant and Alfred Hitchcock too.  I’ve always wondered what it actually would have been like to meet Alfred Hitchcock.  The virtual conversation with he and Ben hosted by Alicia Malone was so cool too.  I submitted a question for both of them.  You could also listen to him on the Carson Podcast with Mark Malkoff.  Which is all about Johnny Carson and all kinds of people who were on his show over the years.  It’s really neat and so cool.  I love it.  Peter Bogdanovich will surely be missed.  He was a really wonderful man and thanks TCM for having him on the first season of The Plot Thickens with Ben.  It was great.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A great loss of an artist, raconteur and film historian.

Paper Moon was a huge hit to this once 13 year old boy who loved anything about the 1930's.

What a great treat to meet him many, many years later just long enough to tell him so.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I never cared much for his movies. What I adored about him was his love of classic films and his unique understanding of Hollywood Cinema.

He was a throwback to the past and knew more about classic films than anyone who had not actually been involved in them.

His commentaries for classic film DVDs were the best and when he imitated those iconic directors, I couldn't help but laugh. 

Peter was simply born after his time.

I still can't imagine him to be 82. For me he'll always be that wunderkind who was going to make our generation's great "Citizen Kane".

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...