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JANUARY 2010 SCHEDULE IS UP!!!!!


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For what it's worth, the schedule says the version of God's Little Acre that will be shown is the *uncensored* 118-minute version.

 

According to the information on the DVD release, they couldn't show the complete version when the film was released theatrically, and so instead there was a 111-minute version that was released to theaters (the DVD contains both versions).

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> {quote:title=ArchieCarstairs wrote:}{quote}

> Some nice blocks of Pre-Codes in there!

> :-)

 

Arch, you said it!!!! Jan looks like a GREAT month!!!!!!!! So many cool things, I'll have to go through it a bit more, but at first glance it has me rockin' and rollin'!!! :)

 

The only small wish that isn't there is that we continue to have Sat mornings for serials and B series films! Can we please restore that come March??? (I realize it won't happen in Feb). Please??? :)

 

But man, what a lineup of films!!!!! Woohooooo!

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> {quote:title=tcmprogrammr wrote:}{quote}

> I'm glad a few people are happy about the January schedule. I just need to say that most of the credit goes to the programming staff who put together so many of these festivals and tributes. I won't mention names, but it's a great group that really knows what they're doing.

 

TCMProgrammr, you guys rock! Everyone involved with this schedule rocks and deserves much praise! Thank you many times over!

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*"Glad to see so many are happy with the January schedule. To me, it's just evidence of the further demise of TCM as a great CLASSIC movie channel. What another disappointing monthly schedule. "Stripes"???*" - rover27

 

I was wondering when someone would bring up *Stripes* being on the January schedule. I think it is a witty inclusion into a night of "military recruit" / "boot camp" comedies - especially for a channel that declares its mission to present movies from the 20s to the 90s.

 

It is convenient to overlook that the two other titles that night are rarely seen on TCM. *Buck Privates* hasn't been seen in about four years and *No Time For Sergeants* in about twice that long - if not longer. It's too bad that the inclusion of those two films doesn' make the inclusion of *Stripes* irrelevant in the bigger picture.

 

Plus, Ivan Reitman is not a "hack" director from the 80s/90s. He has made some films that will be considered classics by current generations. And star Bill Murray is a talented and funny man. He has even been featured on TCM in an interview about his classic film influences. I still remember his description of seeing a silent film in Paris where he couldn't read the title cards but could still follow the story because of the talent of the acting. He appreciates his classic film history better than some of the other "friends of Elvis Mitchell" that appeared in that series. The dichotomy between Murray's "crude 80s comedian" and "cineaste" personas makes me curious to check out his performance.

 

But none of that matters. I've not seen it and will likely check it out next January. *Stripes* is probably no "worse" a film of the 80s than *Buck Privates* was in the 40s and I plan to watch them all that night. (And maybe *Girls On The Loose* later that night too.)

 

Kyle In Hollywood

 

Edited by: hlywdkjk on Oct 3, 2009 7:40 PM

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> {quote:title=ziggyelman wrote:}{quote}

> looks like a very good month! Has *If I Had A Million (1932)* Been on TCM before??? I recall it being on AMC a long time ago....really a fun film for those that haven't seen it...even for those that have!

 

This is VERY cool and I can't wait to check it out!

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I recall seeing "If I Had A Million" in 1964, when I was 8 or 9, in my hometown of Syracuse, N.Y.; one of the stations showed it on a Friday night. I tuned in because W.C. Fields was in it, and I liked him. However, the station aired the full, uncut version of this pre=Code -- including an episode where Wynne Gibson portrays a prostitute who is among those inheriting a million. She uses her newfound wealth to check into a fancy hotel and sleep...alone, and we see her undressing to lingerie and stockings before going to bed. My mother, who was watching with me, hurriedly changed the channel, and I don't recall whether I got to see the Fields segment.Here's what my youthful eyes saw::

 

http://pics.livejournal.com/vp19/pic/0022pd2g.

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It's been over 40 years since I saw "If I Had a Million", I remember Gary Cooper as a marine but that's about all .The only one I really remember is W.C. Fields buying cars because he hates road hogs. Haven't seen "The Egg and I" in quite a while, that's when we first meet Ma and Pa Kettle as the neighbors of Fred and Claudette."Come and Get It" William Wylers good film which introed Frances Farmer. Billy Wilders terrific "5 Graves to Cairo" and the "Road" marathron with Bing and Bob. All those early Loretta Young films and "The Most Dangerous Game" with Fay Wray and Joel McCrea and Robert Armstrong using the sets they used on "King Kong'. I think this was shot right before "Kong" with the same team behind the camera and Wray and Armstrong in front.All in all a good start for the new year,

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A bit off topic: Kyle, what Ivan Reitman movies do you consider classics? Ghostbusters is mildly amusing, and it typifies the Reagan Era because the human bad guy (William Atherton) works for the EPA, but does that make Reitman more than a journeyman director? That's not intended as a slam at Reitman or at you; it takes talent and hard work to become a decent journeyman. Reitman knew how to make comedies that appealed to the mass audience of the time, but this brand of broad comedy isn't to all tastes. BTW, I find Bill Murray obnoxious in Ghostbusters.

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The January schedule has some interesting choices I'd planned to use in the current programming challenge, so back to the drawing boards! The plus side is that we'll actually be able to see these films:

 

Jeanne Eagels

Miracle in the Rain

Lady in the Lake

The Americanization of Emily

In Which We Serve

Party Girl

No Love for Johnnie

Dragonwyck

Rain

Heller in Pink Tights

Saratoga Trunk

 

And I'm delighted to see Lola Montes on the schedule.

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January has always been my favorite month on TCM (with August in a close second). I don't even know where to begin!! I saw Husbands in the line-up. Whoohoo! Excellent work from star/director John Cassavetes and the entire cast. Also saw The Scarlet Empress, which is unlike anything I've ever seen. Dietrich and von Sternberg knocked me out with this film. I'm keeping my fingers crossed hoping to see Dishonored and Shanghai Express in the future.

 

Edited by: sweetsmellofsuccess on Oct 5, 2009 6:47 PM

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*"A bit off topic: Kyle, what Ivan Reitman movies do you consider classics?"* - kingrat

 

As I said below, Ivan Reitman has made films that will be considered "classics" by current generations. And while I may be part of one of those generations, I, personally, don't necessarily hold in high regard any of Mr. Reitman's films. But that doesn't keep me from acknowledging that many titles he directed (or produced) are well-liked by many of my peers.

 

I will admit that I thought Mr. Reitman directed *Animal House* - but he only produced the film. It is a film that I consider a "classic". But I think *Ghostbusters*, *Twins*, *Kindergarten Cop* and - especially - *Dave* are comedies that many people will continue to watch and enjoy for many years. As you said, they may be "broad" comedies - but they aren't "vulgar", which was also becoming common in film comedies at that time. He gets "points" in my book for that.

 

If one looks at the comedies of the 1930s, romantic/screwball comedies by Leo McCarey and Howard Hawks have survived the years and are still popular. But so have the comedies of Laurel & Hardy and the Marx Bros. which share almost none of the attibutes of the former films. I guess it is the difference between story-driven comedies and character/comic-driven comedies. While *Dave* is most closely cut from the classic "screwball" cloth, the most popular of Mr. Reitman's films are "comic" driven with stars like Murray and DeVito. That's nothing to be ashamed of nor should it be disregarded as a distinct acheivement on his part. Being smart enough to let Bill Murray have free-rein with a character is as valuable as was letting Groucho be Groucho.

 

Leo McCarey had the good luck of helming both *Duck Soup* and *The Awful Truth*, two of the most popular - yet opposite in style - comedies of his era. But there are people that adore one but not the other, though I bet all would likely agree that Mr. McCarey was a talented director. Looking at Mr. Reitman's output of the 1980s and 1990s, the same may be said - if not today, then by generations in the (near?) future.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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The January listing looks great. For me the highlights are gonna be:

*Footsteps In the Dark*

*The Egg and I*

*If I Had a Million*

*Saratoga Trunk*

 

Thanks tcmprogrammer. That makes my day.

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Kyle, I do think that DAVE is a classic that holds up well. ANIMAL HOUSE is very funny. GHOSTBUSTERS and the others seem more routine. Like many another film, GHOSTBUSTERS got a big boost from a catchy title song.

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> {quote:title=sweetsmellofsuccess wrote:}{quote}

> Also saw The Scarlet Empress, which is unlike anything I've ever seen. Dietrich and von Sternberg knocked me out with this film.

 

It's an amazing movie, one of the reasons being that Sternberg fashioned one of the greatest triumphs of style over content in the history of Hollywood.

 

It's only disappointing in that the film really doesn't get into Catherine's prowess as an equestrienne.

 

The film is so mesmerizing in its stark, delirious imagery that, by the time it's over, you're asking yourself who's more insane: Sam Jaffe's Grand Duke Peter, or Sternberg.

 

It's one of the first DVD's I ever bought; happily a local store had the thirty-dollar Criterion disc mispriced at $13.99.

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