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Your Choice For 1948 Best Supporting Actress Oscar


Det Jim McLeod
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Choose who you would have voted for from the actual nominees with your reason why. Since this is Oscar month and TCM is doing their schedules by decade, I thought I would do a category once a week by decade until the end of the month.

THE NOMINEES

Barbara Bel Geddes in I Remember Mama

Ellen Corby in I Remember Mama

Agnes Moorehead in Johnny Belinda

Jean Simmons in Hamlet

Claire Trevor in Key Largo*

*=actual winner

I had to think a bit, but I agree with Academy choice of Trevor. It was a very effective portrayal of an alcoholic gun moll. The scene where gangster Edward G. Robinson makes her sing a song for a drink clinched it for me. 

 

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9 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Choose who you would have voted for from the actual nominees with your reason why. Since this is Oscar month and TCM is doing their schedules by decade, I thought I would do a category once a week by decade until the end of the month.

THE NOMINEES

Barbara Bel Geddes in I Remember Mama

Ellen Corby in I Remember Mama

Agnes Moorehead in Johnny Belinda

Jean Simmons in Hamlet

Claire Trevor in Key Largo*

*=actual winner

I had to think a bit, but I agree with Academy choice of Trevor. It was a very effective portrayal of an alcoholic gun moll. The scene where gangster Edward G. Robinson makes her sing a song for a drink clinched it for me. 

 

AGNES MOOREHEAD IN JOHNNY BELINDA

JOHNNY BELINDA is one of those films where I like everything about it except the one element that got singled out for award recognition- BEST ACTRESS JANE WYMAN, she is absolutely the weak link of an otherwise well-shot and well-acted (and surprisingly pro-woman) film... (whether it's her fault or not, and you can argue that JACK WARNER or JEAN NEGALESCU could be to blame for that.)

But AGNES MOOREHEAD is a fascinator in that film for me- AGGIE didn't always get to play multifaceted characters (although even when she played one-note villains, she was terrific), but her character in JOHNNY BELINDA (a variation on the hard-edged but secretly tender AUNT MARILLA in ANNE OF GREEN GABLES) really shows a tremendous amount of growth as a person, all within a very subtle performance (and one where AGNES uses her FACE a lot.)

Honorable mention to the unnominated JAN STERLING (also in JOHNNY BELINDA)- man, I wish like anything that film had a better FEMALE LEAD because it really could have been something incredible.

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14 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I thought it was hilarious- I would 100% have done something EXACTLY LIKE THIS had I had the technology to when I was growing up.

My childhood technological prank related to film consisted of phoning strangers and playing the audio of Bramwell Fletcher's hysterical laughing scene from The Mummy. Fortunately, that was in the years before caller ID! It was also the days before VCRs, but I captured the audio from TV on my primitive tape recorder.

 

 

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I assume it was a tight race against Trevor and Moorehead,  both veterans with a prior nomination for best supporting actress (Moorehead with 2). 

One's legacy tends to factor in such awards.       I also assume most voters wanted one of these actors to win an Oscar.   Sadly Moorehead never did  (only nominated again for Hush Hush Sweet Charlotte).

Maybe if Moorehead had sung a song she would have won!            

 

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53 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

In my opinion Agnes definitely deserved the Oscar for The Magnificent Ambersons.   As is my metric, she makes me weep.

Teresa Wright was just too.. ..well, ....Teresa Wright.

 

Teresa Wright came out big-time,  being nominated in her first film (The Little Foxes),  then winning for her second film (Mrs. Miniver),  then being nominated again, this time for best actress,  for Pride of the Yankees.

While above I noted that often established actors are awarded before newcomers (e.g. the 3 actresses other than Trevor \ Moorehead in 1948 where newcomers),   this was a case where the newcomer just rolled over the competition from the start of their career.     (and never nominated again).

PS:  and while I understand your point about Wright being, well,  being Wright,   well I guess I like Wright,  so that is right with me! 

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40 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

In my opinion Agnes definitely deserved the Oscar for The Magnificent Ambersons.   As is my metric, she makes me weep.

Teresa Wright was just too.. ..well, ....Teresa Wright.

 

there's a fair case that could be made for AGNES MOOREHEAD as BEST LEADING ACTRESS for THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS, I think maybe the NY Film Critics picked her as their BEST ACTRESS, but ultimately I think it was right she was in supporting. still, it is one of the most DOMINANT supporting performances I can think of.

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44 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

In my opinion Agnes definitely deserved the Oscar for The Magnificent Ambersons.   As is my metric, she makes me weep.

Teresa Wright was just too.. ..well, ....Teresa Wright.

 

MRS. MINIVER is one of the few uninteresting performances TERESA WRIGHT ever gave. She and GLORIA GRAHAME are two actress who I'm glad won Oscars, but scratch my head over the films for which they won.

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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

MRS. MINIVER is one of the few uninteresting performances TERESA WRIGHT ever gave. She and GLORIA GRAHAME are two actress who I'm glad won Oscars, but scratch my head over the films for which they won.

I worked with Teresa Wright in the 1990s. She was lovely. We discussed Mrs. Miniver and agreed that her character's death in that film helped bring America into World War II (which was a good thing.)

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2 hours ago, Swithin said:

I worked with Teresa Wright in the 1990s. She was lovely. We discussed Mrs. Miniver and agreed that her character's death in that film helped bring America into World War II (which was a good thing.)

A while back I was watching The Rainmaker (1997),  and I said to myself "hey,  I know that older lady,,,,".    So I watched more closely since I knew, I knew her,  but couldn't determine who it was.     Then I really listened to her and it came like a flash:  That's Teresa Wright!         (a voice can often be the biggest clue).

As for that last part:  I have always assumed it was Pearl Harbor.      (but if I was sitting with her I would have agreed with her as well).

 

 

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Is TCM showing THE HIGH AND THE MIGHTY any time soon? I know for a looooooong time it languished in RIGHTS ISSUES HELL and was then freed. I've never seen it, but I know CLAIRE TREVOR and JAN STERLING were both nominated for best supporting actress in 1956/7

I really like JAN STERLING a lot.

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57 minutes ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

A while back I was watching The Rainmaker (1997),  and I said to myself "hey,  I know that older lady,,,,".    So I watch more closely since I knew, I knew her,  but couldn't determine who it was.     Then I really listened to her and it came like a flash:  That's Teresa Wright!         (a voice can often be the biggest clue).

As for that last part:  I have always assumed it was Pearl Harbor.      (but if I was sitting with her I would have agreed with her as well).

Mrs. Miniver  was actually released shortly after American entry into the war, but it helped change isolationist America's views.

https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/20150209-the-film-that-goebbels-feared

Btw, to quote Mia Farrow in Radio Days: "Who is Pearl Harbor?"

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1 hour ago, Swithin said:

Mrs. Miniver  was actually released shortly after American entry into the war, but it helped change isolationist America's views.

https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/20150209-the-film-that-goebbels-feared

Btw, to quote Mia Farrow in Radio Days: "Who is Pearl Harbor?"

So you were just humoring her.      Like I said,  I would have done the same.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Is TCM showing THE HIGH AND THE MIGHTY any time soon? I know for a looooooong time it languished in RIGHTS ISSUES HELL and was then freed. I've never seen it, but I know CLAIRE TREVOR and JAN STERLING were both nominated for best supporting actress in 1956/7

I really like JAN STERLING a lot.

I remember TCM aired it a few years ago. It's now owned by Paramount and it is out on DVD. Its worth a look as a precurser of the 70s disaster films. Jan Sterling has a pretty showy part in it.....

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Is TCM showing THE HIGH AND THE MIGHTY any time soon? I know for a looooooong time it languished in RIGHTS ISSUES HELL and was then freed. I've never seen it, but I know CLAIRE TREVOR and JAN STERLING were both nominated for best supporting actress in 1956/7

I really like JAN STERLING a lot.

My all-time Jan Sterling performance is in 1951's Ace in the Hole with Kirk Douglas.   Her great line:  "I never go to church, kneeling  bags my nylons."

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7 hours ago, Swithin said:

Mrs. Miniver  was actually released shortly after American entry into the war, but it helped change isolationist America's views.

https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/20150209-the-film-that-goebbels-feared

Btw, to quote Mia Farrow in Radio Days: "Who is Pearl Harbor?"

Actually, before the U.S.'s entry into WWII, albeit with very few released until about 1940 and thus only one year or so before the U.S.'s entry, Hollywood had indeed begun producing anti-Nazi films. Here are just a few examples:

1939'sMV5BYTIxNWY0ZTItMGYwMC00NzY2LTk5NzktYmQz

1940's MV5BOWVhNTNjMzktNjEyMy00MmQyLTgzMDAtZjc3 ...and causing Hitler to ban all MGM films in Germany thereafter

1940's MV5BNDU3Y2U1MTktZDNkMC00NWMxLWI2YjEtOGFk

1940's MV5BMmExYWJjNTktNGUyZS00ODhmLTkxYzAtNWIz

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