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Movies where love never dies


Toto
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I just watched Wuthering Heights (1939) starring Laurence Olivier as Heathcliff and Merle Oberon as Cathy.  Spoiler alert - don't read on if you haven't seen this film.

At the end, Cathy dies but Heathcliff's love for Cathy continues.

 

Dr. Kenneth enters the room, claiming to have seen Heathcliff walking the moors with a woman. After desperately searching for Cathy's ghost in the snowy cold storm, Heathcliff freezes to death. His soul joins his love in death at their favorite place forevermore:

Dr. Kenneth: I tell you, I saw them both. He had his arm about her. So I climbed up after them. And I found him, only him, alone, with only his footprints in the snow.
Ellen: Under a high rock on a ledge near Peniston Crag.
Dr. Kenneth: Yes.
Lockwood: Was he dead?
Ellen: No, not dead, Dr. Kenneth. Not alone. He's with her. They've only just begun to live. Goodbye Heathcliff. Goodbye my wild sweet Cathy.

In the final memorable image, the young, ghostly spirits of Cathy and Heathcliff are re-united for eternity.  The themes of the nature of love as being both destructive and eternal are in this movie.  It's a great one.  Any thoughts?  Are there other films with a similar love after death themes?

1939 Film Adaptation of Wuthering Heights | LiteraryLadies Guide

 

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On 3/18/2022 at 10:31 AM, unwatchable said:

Forgive me, but I loathe this film. I wish a gigantic rogue wave had washed old Heathcliff and Cathy out to sea.

 

 

Don't hold back with how much you don't like this film!  (just kidding).  I do really like Wuthering Heights but I can understand that the story and characters may not appeal to everyone.  Heathcliff does turn pretty mean later in the movie and Cathy seems stuck on staying with the upper classes.  They are not exactly likable characters through much of the film.  However, to me the theme of the destructiveness of love (i.e., how mean Heathcliff is to his wife) is a major theme in the movie which I think is interesting.  My husband doesn't like WH either.

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1 hour ago, SansFin said:

Death Takes a Holiday (1934)
 

I looked up Death Takes a Holiday (1934) and it looks good.  It stars Frederic March and it involves a story about the grim reaper re-entering life to learn about love.  This is a pre-code romantic drama.  I'll check it out.

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53 minutes ago, Toto said:

Don't hold back with how much you don't like this film!  (just kidding).  I do really like Wuthering Heights but I can understand that the story and characters may not appeal to everyone.  Heathcliff does turn pretty mean later in the movie and Cathy seems stuck on staying with the upper classes.  They are not exactly likable characters through much of the film.  However, to me the theme of the destructiveness of love (i.e., how mean Heathcliff is to his second wife) is a major theme in the movie which I think is interesting.  My husband doesn't like WH either.

It is nice to see when someone understands why a movie they really like may not appeal to others (like you are doing here).   For me,   Heathcliff isn't a likeable character;  not even close.   The fact he had a strong love for Cathy doesn't overcome how much of a jerk he is.    I don't view Cathy as dislikeable,  but that isn't saying much.

I do like the film,  due to its fine production values and acting and as you note the story is a classic and interesting.  

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4 hours ago, Toto said:

I looked up Death Takes a Holiday (1934) and it looks good.  It stars Frederic March and it involves a story about the grim reaper re-entering life to learn about love.  This is a pre-code romantic drama.  I'll check it out.

I hope that you do. It is quite moving. I can say little of it because it would be spoilers but I will say that it is much deeper and far more romantic than any synopsis suggests.

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Really James, for my money I'd go with a movie in which ONE of the lovers die and /or  the other loves the dead one for the rest of their lives, or SHOWS the two lovers together in eternity at the end.  ;) 

All we know in R&J is that they both died.  As for eternity, we'll never know....... :unsure:

Sepiatone

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Gonna take a Sentimental Journey.  Maureen  O'Hara  conks out halfway  through  the film due to  a long-standing  heart condition.

Knowing her time  might  be short she a adopts a cute little blonde  moppet so said  moppet will look after hubby John Payne after

O'Hara checks  out. Of course this doesn't work out all that well and Payne is ready  to  send the kiddy back  to  the  orphanage.

Maureen starts to appear to the kid and  urges her to keep on keepin' on. Eventually Payne comes around and  the two settle down

in a loving  relationship. It doesn't hurt that Payne, a Broadway director/producer, is loaded. Pretty sappy, though there  are a

few good moments and William Bendix provides  some I'm pretty dumb  but I'm kind comic relief.

 

Orpheus, direct by  Jean Cocteau. Wonderfully imagined  film set in the postwar Paris  of cafe intellectual types. Orpheus' wife

Eurydice dies  and he goes down to h e double l to bring her back. After she's back she  accidentally looks  at him and disappears  

down yonder again. Then he is killed, they  reunite and come back to life, not sadder but wiser people. Ingenious special effects

and visuals and an overall magical vibe make this a most excellent film, though  maybe  one dying, then coming back, then going

back, then the other  one  dying, then  both coming back  to  life is  a bit of  a cheat.

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