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Great movie discoveries during 31 Days of Oscar


Toto
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During TCM's 31 Days of Oscar, most of the films are ones I've already seen but I've been keeping an eye out for new movie discoveries.  I just watched a film for the first time that I hadn't seen before, "Through a Glass Darkly" (1961), directed by Ingmar Bergman.  I found this film totally engrossing with interesting philosophical questions and amazing acting performances.  This film was done on a tight budget but it is still great.  I was interested in the way Bergman filmed the character's faces making you try to get inside the character and think about what the character is feeling or what is going on inside the character's mind.

Any 31 Days of Oscar film recommendations?  A new film or, a great film that you revisited to appreciate again.

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2 hours ago, unwatchable said:

It's subtitled.

I love the line about each of us drawing a magic circle around ourselves.

Also, they aired de Sica's Two Women on the same day. Great film.

"Two Women" is an amazing film that doesn't shy away from showing the harsh realities of war.  It's difficult to watch but well worth it.  I think Sophia Loren's performance is powerful.

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8 hours ago, ando said:

Looking over the entire 31 Day lineup, frankly, I'd recommend any one of them! Naturally, I have favorites but forum mod, TopBilled, has deliberately picked the less heralded gems from among the Oscar contenders in the TCM classics thread. You may find an interesting rec or two there.

Thanks for the suggestion but I was really hoping for people's personal reactions/feelings/observations about films rather than lists.  The TCM site has lists you can bring up in seconds.

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9 hours ago, Toto said:

Thanks for the suggestion but I was really hoping for people's personal reactions/feelings/observations about films rather than lists.  The TCM site has lists you can bring up in seconds.

Ha. Yes, lists don't reveal anything about the posters particular take though they can be helpful when winnowing down choices. And most of the time when peeps make queries about what to watch they usually have a criteria that they don't bother to reveal which would prevent unnecessary suggestions. But if I had to pick, say, three films on their month long list that exites me to watch they'd be a musical a drama and a comedy...

Victor Victoria (1982, Blake Edwards)

Musical romp set in 1930s Paris where a broke Julie Andrews teams up with a suddenly unemployed Robert Preston who together create an adrogynous cabaret persona. In comes the macho gangster, James Garner, who falls for Andrews, but won't abide her maintaining the facade of being a man. The flap-jack Jean Harlow-esque girlfriend of Garner, Leslie Ann Warren, and closeted bodyguard, Alek Karris, attempt to influence the proceedings. It's all nonsense but, if you like show tunes, boy, what fun.

The Old Man and The Sea (1958, John Sturges)

Only because I haven't seen it and it's due to air very early tomorrow morning at 4:30am (EST) though it's certainly a legend. Based, of course, on the 1932 Hemingway novella, it's supposedly one of the esteemed film actor Spenser Tracy's best films. It's been given a retreatment, more or less, with Tom Hanks in Cast Away and Robert Redford in Lost, both of which I've seen.  

The Producers (1967, Mel Brooks)

Another one I've yet to watch but, again, legendary. There was a 2005 musical remake that didn't fare as well. But how can you top the Zero Mostel/Gene Wilder team, though I do like Matthew Broderick and Nathan Lane (the '05 version) separately. The film, of course, is about a theater producer and his accountant who, as part of a scam, have to stage the worst stage musical they can create. Because they eventually find one centering around Hitler and the Nazis the film was controversial and initially received mixed reviews.  But it became a cult favorite and found a far more positive critical reception in subsequent years. Brooks got an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay. He later adapted it into a musical, which I've seen several times. But I'm exited to finally see the original. Airing on TCM tomorrow night at 8pm (EST).

 

 

 

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15 hours ago, ando said:

Ha. Yes, lists don't reveal anything about the posters particular take though they can be helpful when winnowing down choices. And most of the time when peeps make queries about what to watch they usually have a criteria that they don't bother to reveal which would prevent unnecessary suggestions. But if I had to pick, say, three films on their month long list that exites me to watch they'd be a musical a drama and a comedy...

Victor Victoria (1982, Blake Edwards)

Musical romp set in 1930s Paris where a broke Julie Andrews teams up with a suddenly unemployed Robert Preston who together create an adrogynous cabaret persona. In comes the macho gangster, James Garner, who falls for Andrews, but won't abide her maintaining the facade of being a man. The flap-jack Jean Harlow-esque girlfriend of Garner, Leslie Ann Warren, and closeted bodyguard, Alek Karris, attempt to influence the proceedings. It's all nonsense but, if you like show tunes, boy, what fun.

The Old Man and The Sea (1958, John Sturges)

Only because I haven't seen it and it's due to air very early tomorrow morning at 4:30am (EST) though it's certainly a legend. Based, of course, on the 1932 Hemingway novella, it's supposedly one of the esteemed film actor Spenser Tracy's best films. It's been given a retreatment, more or less, with Tom Hanks in Cast Away and Robert Redford in Lost, both of which I've seen.  

The Producers (1967, Mel Brooks)

Another one I've yet to watch but, again, legendary. There was a 2005 musical remake that didn't fare as well. But how can you top the Zero Mostel/Gene Wilder team, though I do like Matthew Broderick and Nathan Lane (the '05 version) separately. The film, of course, is about a theater producer and his accountant who, as part of a scam, have to stage the worst stage musical they can create. Because they eventually find one centering around Hitler and the Nazis the film was controversial and initially received mixed reviews.  But it became a cult favorite and found a far more positive critical reception in subsequent years. Brooks got an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay. He later adapted it into a musical, which I've seen several times. But I'm exited to finally see the original. Airing on TCM tomorrow night at 8pm (EST).

 

 

 

I love the scene in "Victor Victoria" when the James Garner character and girlfriend are watching the Julie Andrews character perform.  When the Julie Andrews character removes her/his wig at the end of the musical number, Garner's girlfriend is so happy thinking that she doesn't need to be jealous.  Little does she know that Andrews is a woman, pretending to be a man pretending to be a woman.  I liked seeing Julie Andrews try a new type of role.

I recorded "The Old Man and the Sea" and look forward to seeing it.  The book is fantastic.

VICTORVICTORIA VICTOR VICTORIA LESLEY ANN WARREN Editorial Stock Photo -  Stock Image | Shutterstock    lejazzhot — Victor Victoria, 1982.    1982 film GIF - Find on GIFER

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On 3/22/2022 at 2:41 PM, Toto said:

During TCM's 31 Days of Oscar, most of the films are ones I've already seen but I've been keeping an eye out for new movie discoveries.  I just watched a film for the first time that I hadn't seen before, "Through a Glass Darkly" (1961), directed by Ingmar Bergman.  I found this film totally engrossing with interesting philosophical questions and amazing acting performances.  This film was done on a tight budget but it is still great.  I was interested in the way Bergman filmed the character's faces making you try to get inside the character and think about what the character is feeling or what is going on inside the character's mind.        

I once had an eerie experience related to that film. I had a course in college called "Theological Problems in the Films of Ingmar Bergman." We had to read the scripts if we could get them, see the movies, and read about the films.  One of our texts was The Silence of God: Creative Response to the Films of Ingmar Bergman, by Arthur Gibson. Whilst reading the chapter about Through a Glass Darkly in my dorm room, a spider crawled up the wall on the side of my bed!

I recommend Gibson's book, if you want to read a scholar's take on the film. The chapter on Through a Glass Darkly is called "Evading." Each chapter in the book focuses on a particular film. Chapter titles are "Formulating," "Questing," "Probing," "Evading," "Facing," "Suffering," "Seeing." And finally, the summing up: "Of God."

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6 hours ago, Swithin said:

I once had an eerie experience related to that film. I had a course in college called "Theological Problems in the Films of Ingmar Bergman." We had to read the scripts if we could get them, see the movies, and read about the films.  One of our texts was The Silence of God: Creative Response to the Films of Ingmar Bergman, by Arthur Gibson. Whilst reading the chapter about Through a Glass Darkly in my dorm room, a spider crawled up the wall on the side of my bed!

I recommend Gibson's book, if you want to read a scholar's take on the film. The chapter on Through a Glass Darkly is called "Evading." Each chapter in the book focuses on a particular film. Chapter titles are "Formulating," "Questing," "Probing," "Evading," "Facing," "Suffering," "Seeing." And finally, the summing up: "Of God."

Thanks so much for the book recommendation.  I found a copy and will order it.  After seeing "Through a Glass Darkly" and a couple other Bergman films, I'm really intrigued.  That was an eerie experience with the spider!  When I watched "Through a Glass Darkly" and she talked about seeing the spider, I was stunned.

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