Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Ode to the membership


David Proulx
 Share

Recommended Posts

I’ve been on this site for less than a year. My dad was a fan of old movies and would name actors & actresses he saw during one, and he’d talk about them now & then. We ( my brothers & I) really didn’t care about that at all, but I was always a little impressed at his recall and usually instant recognition of them. Through the years, I realize I’d retained a decent bit of it.

In the last couple of years, I’ve watched only old reruns, old movies, or anything to avoid hearing about current events of recent times, really. By the time I joined this site, I actually thought I knew a thing or two about the old flicks. Since I don’t know anyone personally who cares much about them, I stuck out like a genius. Lol.

Cut to my introduction to you guys: A cold slap of reality is what I got. This group’s knowledge is very impressive. I am but a middle-schooler to your PHD’s. Your recall of star’s resumes, what studios, producers, directors, 2nd-tier character actors in those films is so out of my league.

That said, an opinionated, ignorant slob like me has never been talked down to, and I’ve always felt welcome in this long established base club (it seems), with many members with tens of thousands of posts. Anyway, this is just a tip-o-the-hat to you all, and a thanks. I enjoy my time here.

  • Like 18
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're no "opinionated, ignorant slob". I remember interacting with you when you first joined the site in your thread about Marilyn Monroe. Your post generated some good discussion, pro and con, and you stuck to your guns without ever being inattentive to what others were saying. So a hat tip right back at ya.

I like that you've retained some of your dad's love of old movies; that doesn't seem to be how things generally go these days. When I was a kid (loooong ago) I was very familiar with my parents' tastes; their music (Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, Ella Fitzgerald, etc.) was a real presence in the house and I loved it too, even though at night I stayed up late listening to Chuck Berry and Jerry Lee Lewis on the radio next to my bed. We watched the TV shows of their generation's stars (Red Skelton, Perry Como, etc.) and the whole family enjoyed it. (To this day a corny song like Como's "Hot Diggety" brings a smile to my face.) It makes me sad that generations seem to be so far apart in their tastes these days. 

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember when I felt "ignorant." Sometimes it amazes me how much I have learned about classic film.

I grew up in rural Wisconsin where we didn't have a television until I was in first grade. And this was the late 70s/early 80s, not the stone ages. My mother was from a snobbish upper class family in Chicago, and when she married my dad and started her life in Wisconsin, she basically rejected all the materialism of her background. So this had a profound affect on me and my sisters.

The only reason we received a television set is because one of my mother's aunts in Chicago died and willed it to us.

I spent a lot of the 80s, my preteen and teen years catching up on classic television (usually shows from the 50s and 60s that were being rerun in the afternoons). My sisters and I did not watch any classic movies, unless they happened to be edited down versions that appeared on NBC in the movie-of-the-week slot. 

The first classic movie I remember watching was LOVING YOU (1957) on NBC. I had no idea these kinds of films even existed.

A few years later, my parents divorced and I was just about to start college. I was sent to Chicago to live with my grandparents while my mother tried to figure out where to move with my sisters. She was not going back to Chicago and sent me there as a "peace offering" between her and my grandparents. 

During my first year in college, at DePaul University, I remember getting home from class, and my grandparents would be watching American Movie Classics. This was in the early 90s. I saw a lot of classic movies with my grandparents during this two-year period. It had a profound effect on me...it helped that they would talk about when they had seen these movies first-run in the 1940s and 1950s. It opened up a whole new world to me. 

I decided to change my major to film and I transferred to the University of Southern California so I could enroll in what was then called the USC School of Cinema-TV.  At that point I was interacting with instructors that had worked in classic film, who were semi-retired but teaching college courses. And I started to make student films in my production/directing classes. This led to a job on a long-running television series.

So it was interesting that this farm kid who watched TV for the first time at age 6 (on a limited number of network channels) and didn't see a classic film for the first time till age 12 (an Elvis Presley flick) would become so focused on Hollywood media.

The point of this story is that we all start somewhere...and if the classics become a passion for us, then it can lead to something really fun and worthwhile. Today I look at classic film and classic television as a way to mark and define cultural history. So it continues to remain relevant.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a relative “newbie” I know just what you’re talking about. Life-long classic movie lover, but the conversations here are on a different level than anything I’ve been exposed to. I contribute when I can, but mostly I read at this point. 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, DougieB said:

You're no "opinionated, ignorant slob". I remember interacting with you when you first joined the site in your thread about Marilyn Monroe. Your post generated some good discussion, pro and con, and you stuck to your guns without ever being inattentive to what others were saying. So a hat tip right back at ya.

I like that you've retained some of your dad's love of old movies; that doesn't seem to be how things generally go these days. When I was a kid (loooong ago) I was very familiar with my parents' tastes; their music (Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, Ella Fitzgerald, etc.) was a real presence in the house and I loved it too, even though at night I stayed up late listening to Chuck Berry and Jerry Lee Lewis on the radio next to my bed. We watched the TV shows of their generation's stars (Red Skelton, Perry Como, etc.) and the whole family enjoyed it. (To this day a corny song like Como's "Hot Diggety" brings a smile to my face.) It makes me sad that generations seem to be so far apart in their tastes these days. 

Thanks for kind words. You forgot Lawrence Welk. I remember my brothers & had I to sit through those (almost nobody had two TV's), and we'd laugh at them. As I've gotten older (I'm 60 now), I find much of it I like. Go figure. lol

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, TopBilled said:

I remember when I felt "ignorant." Sometimes it amazes me how much I have learned about classic film.

I grew up in rural Wisconsin where we didn't have a television until I was in first grade. And this was the late 70s/early 80s, not the stone ages. My mother was from a snobbish upper class family in Chicago, and when she married my dad and started her life in Wisconsin, she basically rejected all the materialism of her background. So this had a profound affect on me and my sisters.

The only reason we received a television set is because one of my mother's aunts in Chicago died and willed it to us.

I spent a lot of the 80s, my preteen and teen years catching up on classic television (usually shows from the 50s and 60s that were being rerun in the afternoons). My sisters and I did not watch any classic movies, unless they happened to be edited down versions that appeared on NBC in the movie-of-the-week slot. 

The first classic movie I remember watching was LOVING YOU (1957) on NBC. I had no idea these kinds of films even existed.

A few years later, my parents divorced and I was just about to start college. I was sent to Chicago to live with my grandparents while my mother tried to figure out where to move with my sisters. She was not going back to Chicago and sent me there as a "peace offering" between her and my grandparents. 

During my first year in college, at DePaul University, I remember getting home from class, and my grandparents would be watching American Movie Classics. This was in the early 90s. I saw a lot of classic movies with my grandparents during this two-year period. It had a profound effect on me...it helped that they would talk about when they had seen these movies first-run in the 1940s and 1950s. It opened up a whole new world to me. 

I decided to change my major to film and I transferred to the University of Southern California so I could enroll in what was then called the USC School of Cinema-TV.  At that point I was interacting with instructors that had worked in classic film, who were semi-retired but teaching college courses. And I started to make student films in my production/directing classes. This led to a job on a long-running television series.

So it was interesting that this farm kid who watched TV for the first time at age 6 (on a limited number of network channels) and didn't see a classic film for the first time till age 12 (an Elvis Presley flick) would become so focused on Hollywood media.

The point of this story is that we all start somewhere...and if the classics become a passion for us, then it can lead to something really fun and worthwhile. Today I look at classic film and classic television as a way to mark and define cultural history. So it continues to remain relevant.

Great story. You certainly have come a long way, and certainly know your stuff. I always like reading your posts & comments.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Kikiki said:

As a relative “newbie” I know just what you’re talking about. Life-long classic movie lover, but the conversations here are on a different level than anything I’ve been exposed to. I contribute when I can, but mostly I read at this point. 

I like engaging, but I try to stay in my lane. lol

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/23/2022 at 9:36 PM, David Proulx said:

I actually thought I knew a thing or two about the old flicks. (snipped)  This group’s knowledge is very impressive. I am but a middle-schooler to your PHD’s. (snipped)  I’ve always felt welcome in this long established base club & enjoy my time here.

What a sweet post! I got news for ya: it's the same no matter WHAT your interest. I realized early: There will always be someone prettier/thinner/richer/smarter/whatever than myself in any group.

When I first joined our local Cinephile Society, I was confounded by the President's introduction of the film being screened. Who knew the different Studios? Studio Presidents? Styles? All I knew were basic filmography & who was married to whom. But I kept attending & watching movies-more obscure than 'the top 100 films to see before you die' and slowly come to understand our President's intros. And a decade later, sometimes, I even KNOW the story he's telling!

Sometimes old timers can be cantankerous with newbies, impatient and condescending. I find this group incredibly knowledgeable & thoughtful and mostly enjoy the interaction. I will confess though, as a former copy editor many internet posts make me apoplectic by the poor grammar & narcissism. But in over 50 years of watching classic film I'm still discovering new delights, mostly pointed out by those on this board, THANK YOU!

  • Like 8
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Sometimes old timers can be cantankerous with newbies, impatient and condescending. 

One of my unfortunately impossible-to-break faults is that I am often condescending. (That means that I talk down to people.)

It is quite likely that I came to this forum with less knowledge of Hollywood movies than any other user since the forum began. Others here were quite patient with me in many ways and some even took me under their wings. 

My knowledge remains quite limited of actors' private lives, the influences of certain directors and a broad spectrum of other issues but what views I am able to express are typically accepted as if I am one of the cognoscenti.

It is the new users who come in with fire-and-brimstone indictments of: TCM's programming, denunciations of the hosts or other indignations who meet a stony wall.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, David Proulx said:

Thanks for kind words. You forgot Lawrence Welk. I remember my brothers & had I to sit through those (almost nobody had two TV's), and we'd laugh at them. As I've gotten older (I'm 60 now), I find much of it I like. Go figure. lol

That might be the "nostalgic factor".  A not really traumatic memory of your childhood and fondly remembered.  FWIW, I too tune into many possible reruns of Welk's show for a laugh too.  ;) 

And I originally came here out of an interest in"classic" movies, and not necessarily for tutorial reasons.  That was just the icing on the cake.  ;) 

Sepiatone

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

FWIW, I too tune into many possible reruns of Welk's show for a laugh too.  ;) 

Oh sweet Jesus, you mean like the time Welk's outtro for the song 'One Toke Over The Line' was:

"And there you had a fine rendition of a modern spiritual by Gayle and Dale here." ???  ;)

 

  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Dargo said:

OH, you mean like the time Welk's outtro for the song "One Toke Over The Line" was:

"And there was fine rendition of a modern spiritual by Gayle and Dale." ???  ;)

 

Back in the '60's our local paper's TV book added an extra "April Fool's" page which for the description of Welk's show on that night read, "Mr. Welk and his champagne music makers salute the music of The Mothers Of Invention."  :D 

Sepiatone

  • Like 1
  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

What a sweet post! I got news for ya: it's the same no matter WHAT your interest. I realized early: There will always be someone prettier/thinner/richer/smarter/whatever than myself in any group.

When I first joined our local Cinephile Society, I was confounded by the President's introduction of the film being screened. Who knew the different Studios? Studio Presidents? Styles? All I knew were basic filmography & who was married to whom. But I kept attending & watching movies-more obscure than 'the top 100 films to see before you die' and slowly come to understand our President's intros. And a decade later, sometimes, I even KNOW the story he's telling!

Sometimes old timers can be cantankerous with newbies, impatient and condescending. I find this group incredibly knowledgeable & thoughtful and mostly enjoy the interaction. I will confess though, as a former copy editor many internet posts make me apoplectic by the poor grammar & narcissism. But in over 50 years of watching classic film I'm still discovering new delights, mostly pointed out by those on this board, THANK YOU!

Thank you for the kind words also.  It was my pleasure.

I'm not looking to get your level, or others on this site. I just like to be able to talk movies & actors. Picking up more knowledge is always good, though.

I'm a grammar nazi, myself. The lack of spelling, grammar, and punctuation these days is maddening. I refuse to acknowledge those posts, unless it's obvious they're typos, or are purposely being folksy, so to speak. I can't say I've seen any of those, luckily.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, David Proulx said:

You might say I took poetic license in calling it an ode. lol No poetry, just praise

That can be the subject of the next TCM challenge.  I'll start:

I think that I shall never see

Anything so nice

As a Turner Classic Movie.

 

One thing I keep in mind is that I post here for fun.  Because I enjoy the movies, and I'm interested in reading what people have to say about them.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, SansFin said:

One of my unfortunately impossible-to-break faults is that I am often condescending. (That means that I talk down to people.)

 

Oh, Sansfin,  what would we do without your clever and funny posts?  One of the wittiest people on these boards.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

From years spent wandering film websites, it seems clear that this is the most pleasant and comforting place around. It is so nice to go somewhere where people know classic films, careers, filmographies; a place where people's memories , not just of films, but also of books, television, and music, are blessedly long, instead of being always stuck in the current pop culture bubble. The people here feel like  good longtime friends or  a close-knit family, and we all look out for each other.

I have learned plenty of things here, and I hope I have helped people in return. You have all been so good to me.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, SansFin said:

"If I'm so smart, why ain't I rich?"

LOL

Well, ya know Sans, there's always THIS way here to maybe change what appears to be a dissatisfaction with your current financial status:

Be On J! | Jeopardy.com

(...and so, say hello to either Ken Jennings or Mayim Bialik for me when you get accepted as a contestant...oh, AND of course, be sure to keep all of us here advised as to the air dates as well...sure wouldn't wanna miss 'em) 

;)

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...