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Is TCM going to have to change their name?


Marysara1
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5 hours ago, Marysara1 said:

I was using my T.V.  Guide. In April it said there were going to be some Doris Day shows from T.V. series. I'm not complaining. I know it's happened before but was told that it was kaleidoscope.

I don't quite follow. By any chance, do you happen to mean Kinescope?

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I think she is referring to the kinescope copies of the live anthologies programs that were shown when Grace Kelly was Star of the Month. Also some of them aired during a primetime spotlight on James Dean. But that has been a very rare occurrence, mostly because those two stars didn't make many films.

As for the comment about TCM changing its name, I would say she is referring to TCM now showing classic television episodes which in her mind is not the same as showing classic movies.

We should also mention that back in August 2014 TCM showed a TV movie called "Cold Sassy Tree (1989)" when Faye Dunaway had a Summer Under the Stars day. It was produced in the late 80s for TNT (Turner Network Television) and is in the Turner library.

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They used to run The Tonight Show periodically, and I seem to recall they would show Dick Cavett episodes as well.  As TopBilled stated, there have also been a sprinkling of made-for-TV movies, and one case of a videotaped stage production of Sweeney Todd, when Angela Lansbury was honored.

 

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44 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

They used to run The Tonight Show periodically, and I seem to recall they would show Dick Cavett episodes as well.  As TopBilled stated, there have also been a sprinkling of made-for-TV movies, and one case of a videotaped stage production of Sweeney Todd, when Angela Lansbury was honored.

Some of the made-for-TV movies or TV specials that have aired on TCM:

A CAROL FOR ANOTHER CHRISTMAS (1964)...ten times
DELLA (1964)...one time...Note: this was a pilot for a Joan Crawford TV series that wasn't picked up.
THE GLASS MENAGERIE (1966)...two times
THE DANGEROUS DAYS OF KIOWA JONES (1966)...three times
HONDO AND THE APACHES (1967)..one time
MARS NEEDS WOMEN (1967)...one time
THE IMMORTAL STORY (1968)...seven times
DUEL (1971)...three times
HACKSAW (1971)..one time
SOCRATES (1971)...two times
EARTH II (1971)..one time
WORLD ON A WIRE (1973)...four times
FRANK SINATRA: OL' BLUE EYES IS BACK (1973)...three times
MITZI: A TRIBUTE TO THE AMERICAN HOUSEWIFE (1974)...one time
THE PHANTOM OF HOLLYWOOD (1974)...four times
THE MAGIC FLUTE (1975)..four times
GREEN EYES (1977)...one time
HULLABALOO OVER GEORGIE AND BONNIE'S PICTURES (1978)...one time
THE PLUMBER (1979)...five times
FROM THE LIFE OF THE MARIONETTES (1980)...one time
THE GHOSTS OF BUXLEY HALL (1980)...one time
KENNY ROGERS AS THE GAMBLER (1980)...one time
SWEENEY TODD: THE DEMON BARBER OF FLEET STREET (1982)...seven times
MEANTIME (1984)...one time
THE BAD SEED (1985)...three times
DEATH OF A SALESMAN (1985)...five times
PROMISE (1986)...one time
A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS (1988)...two times
COLD SASSY TREE (1989)...one time
ORPHEUS DESCENDING (1990)...two times
YOUNG CATHERINE (1991)...two times
COOPERSTOWN (1993)...one time
LAKOTA WOMAN: SIEGE AT WOUNDED KNEE (1994)...one time
UNKNOWN PLEASURES (2002)...one time

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Another thing to keep in mind is that television in the 50s and 60s was seen as a way of recreating the low budget B-films that studios had stopped making for the matinee crowd...especially B-noir and B-westerns.

Some television westerns like The Virginian were meant to fill a 90-minute time slot which means they were 73 minutes after you removed the commercials. And that is the length of a feature film. The Virginian had a huge budget and it could afford big name guest stars, usually people whose movie careers were on the downswing.

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19 hours ago, Technicolor33 said:

So Ted Turner sold his name but he doesn’t own it. ?

Like Unwatchable pointed out( or so he thought it seems) he sold the BRAND.   Not his name.  :rolleyes:( D'OH!)  

No doubt(and wisely perhaps) Warner, knowing the foibles of fan loyalty, decided to keep the Turner name on the brand feeling probably many of TCM's viewership would book if it was called something else.  I've seen that happen with other businesses....

A local restaurant chain had a name of what turned out to be a fictitious person (Mama Jean's) and when the original owner sold it to retire due to illness, the new owner's of the chain kept the menu, buildings and their decor intact, but changed the name of the restaurants.  The regulars quit showing up and the chain was dead in less than a year. They're all now various coney's and ham places.

Sepiatone

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21 hours ago, Technicolor33 said:

So Ted Turner sold his name but he doesn’t own it. ?

He didn't sell his name, but his name was part of the company/brand name, and it happens all the time.

Just a few examples from the film business:

There aren't any Warner Brothers left at Warner Bros., William Fox hasn't been a part of the Fox studios since the Wall Street crash in 1929, Louis B Mayer is long gone from MGM (and Sam Goldwyn had no connection to MGM at all after his Goldwyn Pictures was merged into MGM), and Disney's been gone  for nearly 60 years.

Turner sold his media empire back in 1996.

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