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Who to contact to voice my opinion...


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I originally posted this in "Questions for Rbt Osborn", but I see now (from reading other messages) -- that forum has been archived for 3 years. Who knew? Maybe...remove it?

 

I was saying..." I am a true TCM fanatic! I live and breathe OLD movies!! Our nights and weekends are planned around what's on TCM. My husband wanted to cut our cable and I said "Not if we can't get TCM!" Who, how, where do I go to voice my sadness, my frustration, and my opinion over the movie choices being shown (mostly) in the evenings and weekends on TCM, now?"

 

I have watched TCM faithfully for years! I watched AMC before that, until that channel went to pot (showing newer and newer movies first, then repeating the same movies over and over, etc.) Am I out of bounds saying... I wish TCM would not resort to showing these newer, so-so (not proven a classic) movies? I know peoples tastes & choices differ, but I feel the word CLASSIC means "...historically memorable: serving as a standard of excellence: of recognized value: of the highest class..." Shouldn't the movies on TCM have to pass the test of time and be a genuine classic? I see TCM showing more and more newer, common movies that can be seen anywhere, anytime. And, it's happening more and more in the evenings and on the weekends! I see old movies are going to play during the day and then I come home to watch an old movie before bed, or on a rainy Sunday, and I get some hokey movies from the 60s, 70s and 80s!

 

I love TCM. I adore Rbt Osborn. I just don't want the channel to go to the DOGS, like AMC did! I want to be able to come home from work and turn on a CLASSIC movie from days gone by. Not...any ol' movie I can see on other channels, or lame movies that have no business being on a CLASSY, CLASSIC channel like TCM. I can understand theme nights "The Underground", or different genres, but, well, am I alone here?

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Voice your opinion? You just did. It's a well known fact that the vice president in charge of programming and others at TCM regularly read these boards and on some occasions will even respond. Even if they don't reply they do read these things.

 

As for turning into AMC, just look at the January 2010 schedule. I think you'll be feeling a lot better.

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Welcome to the boards!

 

I wrote this about TCM a while back and maybe it will help ease your fears. And Mark's right, January's schedule is great and December's is awfully good, too!):

 

*where do I go to voice my sadness, my frustration, and my opinion over the movie choices being shown (mostly) in the evenings and weekends on TCM, now?*

 

Many people who come here cite that fear. The problem is that the fear is just that, a fear that has no basis in fact. Even after 15 years of being on the air, TCM shows no real signs of moving in that direction.

 

TCM doesn't have commercials, and they are not showing a predominance of post-1970s films at the expense of classic studio era films and they are not abandoning their original mission which is to showcase films from all decades.

 

TCM includes the classics, the b-films, the serials, the cult films and the z-grade films, etc.

 

To TCM, all films are important, no matter who the star, the director or the lack thereof.

 

They program for all of us.

 

The classic lovers, the cult lovers, the sci-fi lovers, the serial lovers, the 1970s lovers, etc, because they understand that all films, no matter what genre, no matter what type, are important to us because film has the ability to entertain us as well as show us about who we were as a society, as a culture, as a nation as well as how far we've come and how far we still have to go.

 

Film has the power to transcend generations and TCM more than any other network understands, appreciates and applauds that power.

 

One thing that anyone who has watched the channel for many years has to understand is that there was a time when much of what TCM showed was new to many of its viewers because they were debuting films that hadn't seen been featured in an uncut, commercial free environment since they were last seen in a movie theater.

 

TCM brought those films to us and they still do. But like any long-term relationship, the newness is off the vine. If a relationship is to survive long-term, change has to occur. It cannot stay the same or that relationship will die.

 

Adding to the dilemma, after years of video-tape masters being the standard-bearer of airing films, technology changed not only TCM but all of us as we embraced the digital age. It is going to take the studios a while to catch up with that just due to the cost and the size of their film libraries.

 

Added to that, Ted Turner merged his media empire with Time-Warner just as the digital revolution was breaking. Which, in a way, made it possible for us to enjoy more films from other studio libraries because they no longer had just the former Turner Film Library to rely on.

 

TCM has changed over the years by offering more Original Productions, documentaries on Hollywood directors, stars, etc.

 

It's graphic look has evolved from the 1930s to the 1950s.

 

It now has a yearly series, *Race and Hollywood* that looks at how minorities have been portrayed over the decades by the studios.

 

But in all this change, it has remained consistent in bringing us the best in film entertainment no matter what the genre or the grade of film. If I want to see cult films or z-grade bad sci-fi films, TCM offers them up each month. If I want the best in studio era glossiness and star machine actors, TCM has that, too. If I want gritty film noirs, great musicals, wonderful westerns and grade-b film of various genres. Guess What? TCM has that, too!

 

And always has.

 

24/7 , TCM programs something to catch the imagination of not all of us, at least some of us. And that is what makes TCM successful.

 

It is the Big Tent of Film. It's not programmed for any one group or any hard time-line. It is programmed for all of us who love film.

 

We are in tough economic times right now and even Time-Warner has suffered major losses. TCM is tightening its belt and its budget but doing all it can to bring us great programming though for now it may include more repeats than some of us of like. I don't think I'm the only one who would rather have the repeats than not have the TCM I love.

 

As for the programming of rare films late at night or overnight, there are archived threads from the early days of this message board that talk about this and complain about it. In addition, there are Usenet groups such as alt.silent.movies where this has been a topic of discussion dating back to the mid and late 1990s. so it is not a new phenom to TCM programming.

 

The problem lies more with us and our memories of how we remember it being versus how it really was.

 

And that is a phenom that is not just regulated to TCM programming but to the way we live our lives.

 

AMC didn't last 15 years before going to the dark side. Why would TCM abandon the market where they are the king to battle again with a cable network that they bested in the first place?

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> {quote:title=littlelorijo wrote:}{quote}

> I love TCM. I adore Rbt Osborn. I just don't want the channel to go to the DOGS, like AMC did! I want to be able to come home from work and turn on a CLASSIC movie from days gone by. Not...any ol' movie I can see on other channels, or lame movies that have no business being on a CLASSY, CLASSIC channel like TCM. I can understand theme nights "The Underground", or different genres, but, well, am I alone here?

 

No, you are not alone here. A lot of TCM fans agree with you.

 

I date back to the mid-?70s when Ted Turner first put WTBS on nation-wide cable systems and showed old classic movies on it. And I don?t like the modern movies either.

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Many of us have DVD recorders, VCRs (remember those?) or DVRs to time-shift TCM programming to a more convenient viewing time. I have four DVD recorders and two HDD/DVD recorders set up to record TCM. At the moment Cynara (1932) is being recorded by a Panasonic DVD recorder in my home office. Tomorrow at this time Undercurrent (1946) will be recorded by a Panasonic DVD recorder in my bedroom.

 

Back in 2007 I transfered to DVD selected portions of my near twenty year accumulation of home recorded videotapes. Now, if I want to watch a movie, say one originally shown on The Nostalgia Channel back in 1987, I look it up in my home-recorded DVD Index (a MS Works database), find the DVD number, open the appropriate DVD storage album, locate the disc, pop it in a DVD player, and play the movie. This process may take a less than one minute.

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Oh I know exactly how you feel!

I'm in college now, and a lot of my peers think it's strange that I get so frustrated with films from 1980+ being shown on TCM! A classic(from what I have learned) is something that is at least 50 years old.

TCM is pushing it by showing films made after 1960, let alone the 1980's!

I actually made something for a powerpoint debating this subject for my Public Speaking coarse: http://i34.tinypic.com/iej8rs.jpg

Yes, Denzel Washington is a great actor. Yes, his films are great. But he was born in 1954!!!! DECADES after the best films in history were made!!! He's not a legend yet! He's barely even been in the industry for 25 years! Nothing of his is a classic yet!

 

But my opinion of AMC has been the same ever since I was in middle school. It can't stand up to TCM! EVER! I guess to appeal to the masses, Turner Classic must show post 60's stuff every now and then, but it should be at like 4am when us classic-lovers are slumbering!!

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Classic isn't simply defined by age. It was never TCM's mission to just show movies from the Golden Age of Hollywood. While dutifully preserving Golden Age film culture, it is just as much a channel for cinephiles . Of course, these aren't mutually exclusive; in fact, I think they go hand in hand.

 

TCM did plan to play Michael Mann's Thief (1981) in November but it seems they've opted out. Mann is considered one of the most important contemporary American filmmakers and I think it would be refreshing and appropriate to see one of his early under appreciated works featured on TCM in its correct aspect ratio. I'm overjoyed to see The Coen's O Brother Where Art Thou on the lineup this month with Preston Sturges' Sullivan's Travels. The tribute to Hayao Miyazaki several years ago was a great way for TCM to tip its hat to the living genius of world class traditional animation in an era that has forsaken it.

 

If you look at the scheduling, the vast majority of TCM's programming is from the 1930s, 40s, and 50s. Nothing indicates that this is going to change. If anything, I'd lightly chide them for not giving the silent era more presence. Too many of those masterpieces are unavailable to consumers and TCM is the only channel that gives us an opportunity to see them. Did you know even Chaplin's feature films are out of print again?!!

 

The only thing I could ask of TCM is to show more silent and international classics but I really can't say I'm disappointed with what they do everyday. It's an important service.

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*TCM did plan to play Michael Mann's Thief (1981) in November but it seems they've opted out.*

 

Jonas,

 

Welcome to the boards. In regards to *Thief*, it may be that there underlying circumstances with either the rights or the digital print that caused it to be pulled from the schedule.

 

Hopefully, whatever the delay is, it will be worked out and one of these days *Thief* will return to the schedule.

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