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Somewhat Off Topic: How do YOU file/sort movie DVDs?


Tikisoo
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I cannot believe after twenty five years, I'm still recording movies on TCM. There are still so many movies I haven't seen, many worth keeping a hard copy to share or watch again.

I've recorded the same movie twice intrigued by the prospect, then finding I had recorded it & forgotten it because underwhelming. 

I then began filing my disks, grouping by decade, star or even theme. For instance, it became clear I wanted to see every Judy Holiday or Errol Flynn movie. So I just grouped those recordings by "star". It was easy to group the odd Cagney or Bogart into "WB Tough Guys" box. 

I had so many Sci Fi movies, I quickly had to sub group them to "Fantasy", "Space", "Classic Horror". Ghosts & Angel movies go into Fantasy.

Then there are programmers with varying stars/studios/genres or just titles that don't belong anywhere. I file those in a shoebox by decade. It's easy to find a random title when narrowed down like that. 

Like with Albums of yore, alphabetical always works, but you often have to shift several spaces when adding to the A's or B's.

What's your method?

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Alphabetical for NTSC titles, then alphabetical for the smaller number of UK (PAL) titles. I have some duplicates, meaning that I will occasionally record something on my DVR that I have a DVD for, since the access is a little easier. But I can't depend on that, because I had to change my cable/DVR box last year and lost everything.

That's for my open shelves, which have limited space for DVDs. I also have stacks of DVDs behind them, and in the closet, but those are films/programs that were recorded for me on DVD. I don't have a huge collection.

My most organized shelves begin with The Alamo and The Ape Man, and end with The Wolf Man (Legacy Collection) and Zubeidaa; then the PAL section begins with The Camomile Lawn and concludes with the Terence Davies Collection.

 

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Good question and we have discussed it, but never came up with a process.  So, we use the helter-skelter method.  DVD's I recorded are mostly in a tall CD cabinet that we have.  Two DVD jewel boxes will fit into one slot.  Also have some mystery store bought DVD's standing upright in lower portion.  Also keep several TV series sets in there.

Have an old entertainment center that has four large drawers and that is where most of DVD's are kept.  One drawer has TV series and Sci-Fi.  Other drawers are just a mish-mash.

Organizing the DVD's is on my to do list-probably ranks about 150 or so.  Right before organizing CD's. 😀

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I have all of my favorite movies listed in my computer under " My Documents."   Each of 3 categories has its own page:  Comedy, Drama, Musical.   I then add the dates that I watch a movie under its title.  If I buy it on DVD or Blu-ray, I also add that info with date of purchase and price.

I have 5 tall DVD cabinets that are perfect "bookcases" to alphabetically store DVDs upright.  My TV stand also has two side wings that swing out for DVD storage.   With about 192 DVDs, including 30 Blu-rays, it works for me.

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My 16mm features are catalogued chronologically by Studio. Stored alphabetically (except for series). 16mm shorts stored by studio. DVD's shelved by studio. Off-air DVD's shelved alphabetically. Blu-rays are all in my projection booth stacked somewhat haphazardly. I don't bother cataloguing video formats.

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Back in the "day" when I was copying and recording movies off cable premium stations I accumulated so many tapes I found it easier to number the tapes and catalog them numerically.  

Now I just stash them in a "media cabinet" in no particular genre or alphabetical order.  I do however, store my music CDs in both genre and alphabetical order.

Sepiatone

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All of the movies in my collection are currently in boxes and have been for the past 10 years. After moving several times, I got tired of packing and unpacking them.

But when they were on display, I grouped movies by genre. I also created a catalogue of my collection, grouping titles by genre, studio, filmmaker (director, producer), actor, and format (VHS, LaserDisc, DVD, Blu-ray disc).

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I have Blu-rays and DVDs separate, each group in alphabetical order. Also TV seasons/complete series sets are in another area. 

I also use the Blu-ray.com website to keep genre-specific groupings of movies. You can archive your own collections, either all combined, or divided by format, genre (of which you can create categories yourself), or other parameters. That way I can look up, say, 'Westerns', and then when I see which one I'm interested in, just look for it alphabetically on my selves. 

I've tried other organizing methods - by year, by publisher (all Criterion together, all Arrow together, etc.) [which by the way was the most visually appealing format] - but in the end I always come back to alphabetical for ease of use.

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When I used to record films from TCM, RetroPlex, FXM Retro, PBS or the Encore Western Channel, I collected them on my DVR. The DVR would run out of space, so I would transfer them to disc if I wanted to keep a copy but only after I had decided on a theme. My discs are labeled by theme, with anywhere from two to four films on each disc. I group these themed discs alphabetically, both in how I store them in a walk-in closet and in how I catalogue them using a Word file.

Examples: 

MAE WEST & CARY GRANT
- SHE DONE HIM WRONG (1933)
- I'M NO ANGEL (1933)

MAGNIFICENT FILMS
- THE MAGNIFICENT YANKEE (1950)
- THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS (1942)

MAID TO BE PLAYED BY HATTIE MCDANIEL
- ZENOBIA (1939)
- THE MAD MISS MANTON (1938)
- GEORGE WASHINGTON SLEPT HERE (1942)

MAISIE VOL. 1
- MAISIE (1939)
- CONGO MAISIE (1940)
- GOLD RUSH MAISIE (1940)
- MAISIE WAS A LADY (1941)

MAISIE VOL. 2
- RINGSIDE MAISIE (1941)
- MAISIE GETS HER MAN (1942)
- SWING SHIFT MAISIE (1943)

Some films were deliberately recorded twice, if they fit a different theme on another disc...which allows me to basically have a back-up if it's a title I enjoy watching.

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I should add that I do put all my western films together, since the labels on those discs all start with the same phrase...

OUT WEST WITH A BAD MAN
- BADMAN'S TERRITORY (1946)
- TRIBUTE TO A BAD MAN (1955)

OUT WEST WITH ALAN LADD
- THE BADLANDERS (1958)
- DRUM BEAT (1954)
- GUNS OF THE TIMBERLAND (1960)

OUT WEST WITH ALEXIS SMITH & ERROL FLYNN
- SAN ANTONIO (1945)
- MONTANA (1950)

OUT WEST WITH ANNE BAXTER
- 20 MULE TEAM (1940)
- YELLOW SKY (1948)

OUT WEST WITH ANTHONY QUINN
- BLACK GOLD (1947)
- MAN FROM DEL RIO (1956)
- GUNS FOR SAN SEBASTIAN (1968)

You get the idea. :) 

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4 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Strictly alphabetical.

First-Absolution (1978) Richard Burton, Billy Connolly

Last- Zodiac (2007) Jake Gyllenhaal, Mark Ruffalo

You made me curious about my own collection...

Blu-ray

First - The ABCs of Death (2012)

Last - Zoolander  (2001)

DVD

First - A Nous la Liberte  (1931)

Last - Zulu  (1964)

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Our current sorting method is to try to figure out which moving box a DVD might be in based on which DVDs are on the top. It is sad to say that it may be a year or more before we can build a proper storage cabinet and so have ready access to all of them.

We separate purchased DVDs from recorded-from-broadcast DVDs because the cases are of such different sizes. Each set is strictly alphabetical. We use a database to sort into lists of genres, actors, years and etc.. 

First - $ (1971)

Last - Zombieland (2009)

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7 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

All of the movies in my collection are currently in boxes and have been for the past 10 years. After moving several times, I got tired of packing and unpacking them.

But when they were on display, I grouped movies by genre. I also created a catalogue of my collection, grouping titles by genre, studio, filmmaker (director, producer), actor, and format (VHS, LaserDisc, DVD, Blu-ray disc).

I’d like to know more about laser disc. 

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Tell me something about Blu-ray. Do I need to update my player in order for it to play discs ?  By update , I mean connecting the player to the internet and doing a firmware update. Will discs refuse to play if I don’t ? Did any of you have any issues playing discs ?

 

what if I want to watch my Blu-rays 10-15 years from now ? Can’t watch my discs if my player is old and needs an update. 
this has me worried. And I’ve been hesitant to buy Blu-ray. 
 

 

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2 hours ago, Technicolor33 said:

Tell me something about Blu-ray. Do I need to update my player in order for it to play discs ?  By update , I mean connecting the player to the internet and doing a firmware update. Will discs refuse to play if I don’t ? Did any of you have any issues playing discs ? . . .

My Two Cents: Don't bother.

Physical Media Junkies will argue otherwise.

Just as disc records replaced phonograph cylinders . . .

Just as CDs replaced disc records . . .

Just as MP3 files replaced (or are replacing) CDs . . .

Just as videocassettes replaced 8mm and 16mm movies . . .

Just as DVD replaced videocassettes (and LaserDiscs) . . .

Just as DVD is being replaced by Blu-ray discs . . .

Blu-ray discs are being (or will be) replaced by video on demand and streaming media.

2 hours ago, Technicolor33 said:

. . . what if I want to watch my Blu-rays 10-15 years from now ? Can’t watch my discs if my player is old and needs an update. 
this has me worried. And I’ve been hesitant to buy Blu-ray.

You're asking the right questions! You're exactly right to be hesitant, IMO.

If you're struggling "to buy groceries, keep the car filled with gas, pay bills," ask yourself if you can afford to (should) invest in a home entertainment format that is on the way out.

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14 minutes ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

My Two Cents: Don't bother.

Physical Media Junkies will argue otherwise.

Just as disc records replaced phonograph cylinders . . .

Just as CDs replaced disc records . . .

Just as MP3 files replaced (or are replacing) CDs . . .

Just as videocassettes replaced 8mm and 16mm movies . . .

Just as DVD replaced videocassettes (and LaserDiscs) . . .

Just as DVD is being replaced by Blu-ray discs . . .

Blu-ray discs are being (or will be) replaced by video on demand and streaming media.

You're asking the right questions! You're exactly right to be hesitant, IMO.

If you're struggling "to buy groceries, keep the car filled with gas, pay bills," ask yourself if you can (should) afford to invest in a home entertainment format that is on the way out.

I only buy movies on Christmas or on my birthday. 

I’d rather own a copy of something than stream. 
 

LPs are called Vinyl now. And they’ve replaced downloads and CDs. They’re mass produced again for the first time in 30 years. And I want to start collecting.

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46 minutes ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Technicolor33,

I don't know your age and if you were around during the era of long playing records (LPs). LaserDiscs resembled LPs. A more current simile: think of a LaserDisc as a giant DVD.

 

I know what laser discs are. I just want to know how you were able to buy them way back then. Hardly anyone sold them. No laserdisc rental stores around. All stores I know had VHS rentals (Hollywood video , blockbuster). 
 

im 30 years old. I grew up using VCRs and VHS. 
 

how does the quality compare to VHS ?

I keep hearing from different sources that laser disc is some ways better than DVD.

Discs were expensive to buy. Like $29.95 per title. That would be somewhere around $50 in today’s money. Per film. Meanwhile , VHS was selling for $14.95 ($27 in today’s money). Criterion titles were $100 !

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I have movies recorded on the DVR, but I don’t record personal copies off the DVR. Any recording I watched and loved, I move it to a “Keep” folder. 

I have a ton of DVDs and Blu rays. I have them in shelves lining both sides of my bedroom. I have my box sets in one set of shelving—alphabetized by subject and then smaller multi-film sets are grouped by genre. I also have my TCM Greatest… box sets together and alphabetized. My Forbidden Hollywood Precode are in order by volume number. 

My Criterion are segregated and alphabetized. My complete Fox Film Noir set is segregated and in order by volume number.  The rest of my collection is alphabetized, regardless of format or boutique label.

I actually just finished re-organizing it and just took photos. 

 

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12 minutes ago, Technicolor33 said:

I know what laser discs are. I just want to know how you were able to buy them way back then. Hardly anyone sold them. No laserdisc rental stores around. All stores I know had VHS rentals (Hollywood video , blockbuster). 
 

im 30 years old. I grew up using VCRs and VHS. 
 

how does the quality compare to VHS ?

I keep hearing from different sources that laser disc is some ways better than DVD.

Discs were expensive to buy. Like $29.95 per title. That would be somewhere around $50 in today’s money. Per film. Meanwhile , VHS was selling for $14.95 ($27 in today’s money)

I personally skipped the Laserdisc phase of home video, but I had a friend that had a player and several dozen films. I borrowed his machine once and watched the titles he had that I hadn't seen. The visual quality was comparable to a DVD, but with Laserdiscs you had to flip them over (as you did with the first generation of DVDs) to see the second half of the movie. Longer movies would have multiple discs. The size, cost and relative difficulty in finding them meant they didn't last too long as a viable home video market, but there were a few years where they could be found at larger chain retailers. I will say that for the decades I worked at video stores, both private and chain, we never rented them out. However, I'm in a small town, and I'm sure larger towns had rental options. 

Blu-rays have greatly enhanced video quality, but it really becomes a factor the larger your screen is. I have fairly large TVs, so the difference between DVD and Blu-ray is very noticeable. However, like with any format, the quality varies from title to title and company to company. My Blu-ray player is a Sony, and it does do firmware updates occasionally, but I don't know how much of that is for the disc playing and how much is for the various streaming apps that came pre-installed (and which I never use).

Blu-ray has already become passé for the hardcore home theater folks, replaced by 4K discs and televisions. I don't have any 4K TVs and have no current interest in getting one or "upgrading" my collection yet again. I'll stick with my Blu-rays and DVDs (and handful of VHS) until I shuffle off this mortal coil.   

And while I use streaming to watch stuff too, I will always be a physical media person first and foremost, as I find streaming unreliable at best, and getting worse in many ways all the time.

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32 minutes ago, Technicolor33 said:

I know what laser discs are. I just want to know how you were able to buy them way back then. Hardly anyone sold them. No laserdisc rental stores around. All stores I know had VHS rentals (Hollywood video , blockbuster) . . .

how does the quality compare to VHS ?

I keep hearing from different sources that laser disc is some ways better than DVD.

Discs were expensive to buy. Like $29.95 per title. That would be somewhere around $50 in today’s money. Per film. Meanwhile , VHS was selling for $14.95 ($27 in today’s money). Criterion titles were $100 !

In my small corner of the universe, there was a retailer, LaserLand Home Theater. That's where I spent waaaayy too much money on LaserDiscs.

Yes, there were expensive, especially Criterion Collection LaserDiscs -- the "crème de la crème" -- of that format.

As for LaserDiscs being better than DVD, some were, some weren't. An academic and moot subject. LaserDisc is dead.

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12 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

. . . but with Laserdiscs you had to flip them over (as you did with the first generation of DVDs) to see the second half of the movie . . .

I had . . . still have . . . a Pioneer LaserDisc player that automatically "flipped" . . . "flips" . . . discs. But whether a disc was manually or automatically flipped, the viewing experience was interrupted. Annoying, to say the least.

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