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Gene Wilder tribute, April 24th.


ElCid
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Sunday, April 24, 8:00 PM and 9:45 PM ET TCM will pay tribute to Gene Wilder with two movies.  Blazing Saddles and then Silver Streak.  Cleavon Little costars in Saddles and Richard Pryor and Jill Clayburgh costar in Streak.  Patrick McGoohan is very good as the bad guy.  

Silver Streak is a great movie.

SPOILERS BELOW

Of course, the train is very heavily featured in Streak and is actually CP Rail's Canadian.  CP Rail is Canadian Pacific Railroad, but AMRoad and Silver Streak signage covered the CP Rail signage.  AMTrak refused to cooperate in making the movie - they did that a lot back then.

The Silver Streak was also a train in a 1934 movie.  More info available if anyone wants it.

 

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52 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Wonder if TCM will excise that certain word from BLAZING SADDLES?  ;) 

Sepiatone

I haven't seen Blazing Saddles in a long, long time so I do not know the word.  However, both movies show up as TV-MA on the TCM Schedule.  Wilder uses S O B a few times in Silver Streak, as well as some other words.

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42 minutes ago, Technicolor33 said:

Hope they’re showing Willy Wonka and young Frankenstein. I like Silver Streak. Very funny movie. He and Richard Pryor are funny together. 
 

don’t care much for blazing saddles. It has its funny moments though.

Go to https://www.tcm.com/schedule/  to see what is scheduled.  It appears these are the only two movies, at least on the 24th.  

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I love Gene Wilder.  He's the best Willy Wonka hands down.  I also love him as the accountant in "The Producers".  His comic performance as Leo Bloom, the nerdy accountant who gets panicky and hysterical.  I laugh just thinking about it.  Doesn't look like TCM is showing these for the tribute - unfortunately.  I loved Blazing Saddles as a kid just for the scene around the campfire eating beans but it's not my favorite Gene Wilder movie.

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2 hours ago, slaytonf said:

But she has a change of heart after he blows up Mongo:

It's actually kind of a subtle joke, because you can't tell whether she's quoting her entire previous statement (Sorry about the "up yours, n***er") or just taking yet another opportunity to call him one (Sorry about the "up yours," n***er)...

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8 hours ago, David Proulx said:

They never said the word, if I remember right. It was drowned out each time they tried, which was the gag.

You're thinking of Gabby Johnson on the roof with a telescope trying to tell the townspeople that "The new sheriff is a N- (bong!)" A bell sounded when he said the word so the townies thought he was saying "The sheriff is near!" 

There is probably also a TV edit made where the actual usage is more creatively censored. 

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5 hours ago, LuckyDan said:

You're thinking of Gabby Johnson on the roof with a telescope trying to tell the townspeople that "The new sheriff is a N- (bong!)" A bell sounded when he said the word so the townies thought he was saying "The sheriff is near!" 

There is probably also a TV edit made where the actual usage is more creatively censored. 

Yup, unless Sepiatone was referring to some other word. Again, it's been a while, but I don't think you can read Gabby Johnson's lips, so censoring it any further than Mel Brooks already did, you'd have to delete the scene altogether. What warped ideas are being implemented these days, because of fear of fake outrage. Ugh.

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I love Gene Wilder, love those movies-ALL of them. I was a little disappointed in Silver Streak, only recently seeing it for the first time. There wasn't enough Wilder/Pryor scenes. I suppose that's why STIR CRAZY '80 was made - time for me to see that one.

We watched BLAZING SADDLES with our teen when she was around 15-16. Not seeing it in decades, I was shocked to hear the N word spoken along with other "political incorrect" comedic bits.  Although I didn't find it funny-the old lady saying it-I understand the humor they were going for.

None of it was truly offensive; none of the blacks, Hispanics, cowboys or gypsies in the room took any of the humor personally. In fact, when this movie is shown in prison, the black guys whoop, holler & laugh the most. The key is the Sheriff is the smartest guy, the best looking guy, the HERO.

So much for you snowflakes....let us decide for ourselves instead of telling us how offended we should be.

 

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

I love Gene Wilder, love those movies-ALL of them. I was a little disappointed in Silver Streak, only recently seeing it for the first time. 

I never got the appeal of Silver Streak. Saw it on first release with an audience that howled at it. I tried to get into the spirit like a good audience member but, no. I remember only one gag, involving pliers, that was trite even then. I winced. The audience thought it was high humor. 

 

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I love Gene Wilder, love those movies-ALL of them. I was a little disappointed in Silver Streak, only recently seeing it for the first time. There wasn't enough Wilder/Pryor scenes. I suppose that's why STIR CRAZY '80 was made - time for me to see that one.

We watched BLAZING SADDLES with our teen when she was around 15-16. Not seeing it in decades, I was shocked to hear the N word spoken along with other "political incorrect" comedic bits.  Although I didn't find it funny-the old lady saying it-I understand the humor they were going for.

None of it was truly offensive; none of the blacks, Hispanics, cowboys or gypsies in the room took any of the humor personally. In fact, when this movie is shown in prison, the black guys whoop, holler & laugh the most. The key is the Sheriff is the smartest guy, the best looking guy, the HERO.

So much for you snowflakes....let us decide for ourselves instead of telling us how offended we should be.

 

HA!  Yeah, before I got a chance to see it at the show when it came out, I heard about a lot of it from a black co-worker who saw it and had high praise for it's comedy.  Great scenes like;

And....

Sepiatone

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I saw Willy Wonka in the theater as a 10 year old, the perfect age for enjoying the story. I also saw the 2005 version at the theater and found fairly amusing.

A vintage theater screened the Gene Wilder Willy Wonka movie for Father's Day, the only other time I have seen it since childhood. Knowing the story, obviously knowing the ending- this time, the ending made me cry. I have to believe it is somehow because of Gene Wilder's charm in the role.

th?id=OIP.Snq9oR_GpbNX7BrN5OcTlwHaEK&pid

Gene_Wilder_Willy_Wonka_1971.jpg

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5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I saw Willy Wonka in the theater as a 10 year old, the perfect age for enjoying the story. I also saw the 2005 version at the theater and found fairly amusing.

A vintage theater screened the Gene Wilder Willy Wonka movie for Father's Day, the only other time I have seen it since childhood. Knowing the story, obviously knowing the ending- this time, the ending made me cry. I have to believe it is somehow because of Gene Wilder's charm in the role.

 

 

I love the Gene Wilder version of the tale, and he really did make the character his own, in a completely charming way.

I remember some report, shortly before he died, that Steven Spielberg wanted him for a small part in Ready Player One, playing a character only shown in flashbacks, a Wonka type video game czar who hid special elements in his virtual reality world before he died, so that one player could win his multi-billion dollar dynasty. In essence, the film was a high-tech version of Wonka; if he had had the ability to do it, it would have made the film unbearably poignant in his final scene

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I can't wait!!!  Love Gene Wilder. Although I know Cleavon Little did one hell of a job in Blazing Saddles, I can only imagine what would have happened if Richard Pryor who was supposed to play that role, would have actually been in it. Especially with their on screen chemistry. I would guess that probably us folks on TCM are maybe the only ones who know that Mr. Pryor wrote Blazing Saddles with Mel Brooks. 

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15 hours ago, Coach E-Dub said:

I can only imagine what would have happened if Richard Pryor who was supposed to play that role

Personally, I prefer Cleavon Little in the role- so handsome & well spoken, he played the comedy seriously which I think made it much funnier. He meshed perfectly with Wilder's persona & style. Although I love Pryor, his comedic style was just more nervous & broader, often outshining Wilder.

Cleavon Little was a great actor given inordinate little screen time in his short career (died at 53 y/o) Apparently, he did more stage acting and smaller TV guest appearances after this one starring role in BLAZING SADDLES.

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47 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Personally, I prefer Cleavon Little in the role- so handsome & well spoken, he played the comedy seriously which I think made it much funnier. He meshed perfectly with Wilder's persona & style. Although I love Pryor, his comedic style was just more nervous & broader, often outshining Wilder.

Cleavon Little was a great actor given inordinate little screen time in his short career (died at 53 y/o) Apparently, he did more stage acting and smaller TV guest appearances after this one starring role in BLAZING SADDLES.

Quite agree. I saw Cleavon with Judd Hirsch in "I'm Not Rappaport" and while the play didn't mean all that much to me, the performances were enjoyable. I liked him on "Temperatures Rising" too. 

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On 4/18/2022 at 10:18 AM, TikiSoo said:

I saw Willy Wonka in the theater as a 10 year old, the perfect age for enjoying the story. I also saw the 2005 version at the theater and found fairly amusing.

A vintage theater screened the Gene Wilder Willy Wonka movie for Father's Day, the only other time I have seen it since childhood. Knowing the story, obviously knowing the ending- this time, the ending made me cry. I have to believe it is somehow because of Gene Wilder's charm in the role.

th?id=OIP.Snq9oR_GpbNX7BrN5OcTlwHaEK&pid

Gene_Wilder_Willy_Wonka_1971.jpg

Cripes.  I saw it so much since my kids were little(and subsequentially  when a certain grandniece was little) that I nearly got to where I could recite everybody's lines by rote.

I never saw it until my area got cable('81) and when it came out I recall it was popular not only among little kids, but Jr. high and high school kids who'd go see it bombed on mescaline.  ;) 

What I also recall a lot is whenever said grandniece would come over, she'd ask to see the movie, but never called it by name.  But referred to it based on it's signature song.  She'd ask, "Can I watch 'Candy Man'?"  And I'd always think I should get a copy of the '92 horror flick "CANDY MAN"!  :D  and put THAT in the VCR instead.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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