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Isn't it supposed to be Turner CLASSIC Movies?


Redlineman
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I'm a crank, a fossil, a curmudgeon and I'm narrow minded. There, that's out of the way.

I am frankly disgusted with the new programming format. I do not consider any movie from the 70's or later to be a classic movie. They are NOT classic movies from the CLASSIC era of Hollywood.  They may be good movies, even great movies, and I like some of them just fine, but they are not CLASSIC movies, and very frankly I have very little interest in them at all, relative to a real CLASSIC. I've been watching old movies all my life, and yet I'm sure I've only scratched the surface of the inventory that is out there. I'm watching a new one now, one I've never heard of, and with two of my favorite character actors in it. I don't believe that TCM has run out of opportunities to show real classic films, and I am getting tired of being disappointed, turning the channel off, and having to search for something to watch elsewhere.

If they want to draw in a younger crowd, let them start Turner Nouveau-Classic Movies!

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31 minutes ago, Redlineman said:

I'm a crank, a fossil, a curmudgeon and I'm narrow minded. There, that's out of the way.

I am frankly disgusted with the new programming format. I do not consider any movie from the 70's or later to be a classic movie. They are NOT classic movies from the CLASSIC era of Hollywood.  They may be good movies, even great movies, and I like some of them just fine, but they are not CLASSIC movies, and very frankly I have very little interest in them at all, relative to a real CLASSIC. I've been watching old movies all my life, and yet I'm sure I've only scratched the surface of the inventory that is out there. I'm watching a new one now, one I've never heard of, and with two of my favorite character actors in it. I don't believe that TCM has run out of opportunities to show real classic films, and I am getting tired of being disappointed, turning the channel off, and having to search for something to watch elsewhere.

If they want to draw in a younger crowd, let them start Turner Nouveau-Classic Movies!

Welcome. I think your post is making a common mistake people make...equating old with classic.

A lot of films made in the 1930s and 1940s were mindless entertainment, just turned out quickly to fill double bills in the theaters.

A good classic film can be made during any era. And a piece of junk can also be made during any era.

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27 minutes ago, Redlineman said:

I'm a crank, a fossil, a curmudgeon and I'm narrow minded. There, that's out of the way.

I am frankly disgusted with the new programming format. I do not consider any movie from the 70's or later to be a classic movie. They are NOT classic movies from the CLASSIC era of Hollywood.  They may be good movies, even great movies, and I like some of them just fine, but they are not CLASSIC movies, and very frankly I have very little interest in them at all, relative to a real CLASSIC. I've been watching old movies all my life, and yet I'm sure I've only scratched the surface of the inventory that is out there. I'm watching a new one now, one I've never heard of, and with two of my favorite character actors in it. I don't believe that TCM has run out of opportunities to show real classic films, and I am getting tired of being disappointed, turning the channel off, and having to search for something to watch elsewhere.

If they want to draw in a younger crowd, let them start Turner Nouveau-Classic Movies!

TCM has shown films that were released after 1968 (approx.. the end of the American studio-era) since it was launched.   

The vast majority of films TCM shows are from the American studio era.    E.g.  > 80% based on actual data. 

I assume that will continue to be the case.   

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This thread is a good excuse for me to publicly grapple with something...LOL

Two nights ago I watched MAUDIE (2016) on Hulu. I don't normally watch films from the 2010s, I guess since a lot of them don't appeal to me.

Anyway, I watched MAUDIE because it was about a woman painter from Canada and also because I figured it would be a character study which it certainly was.

So for a day and a half this film has resonated within me...I keep debating if it is actually a classic film, or just a film about a classic subject. I feel the lead actress (Sally Hawkins) is doing some scientific method acting, relying on tricks to convey the woman she is portraying, instead of connecting to the real human side of her. But it is still an effective performance. Ethan Hawke plays the husband and I've never really rated him as an actor but he's decent in this one.

I love the on-location filming in New Foundland and Labrador, and if you stick with it to the end, the film does transport you to somewhere special. 

I am still reluctant to call it a classic, not because it was only made six years ago, but because I am not sure if I will still be enamored with it six years from now.

***

Incidentally, I think it's a film that could easily air on TCM as it would fit a theme on real life painters. It is also a story about a woman's spirit persevering, which would dovetail nicely with some of TCM's feminist agenda.

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26 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Remember the word "Classic" is a marketing word. 

 

7 minutes ago, yanceycravat said:

Let's also remember the word "CLASSIC" in regard to film is open to a wide interpretation.

We've had this discussion in this forum several times since I registered  11 years ago.  

And both TB and Yancey  hit the nail on the head.  While "classic" does, for many, conjure up the notion of something old, it also indicates anything that is timeless.  And that can come from ANY era.  That many people can still enjoy movies such as THE WIZARD OF OZ and GONE WITH THE WIND 83 years after their theatrical releases is what makes them "classic".  Not that they're 83 years old.  And there are, no doubt, many movies even older that nobody cares for.  So, being 83+ years old in their case, doesn't really make them "classic" does it? ;) 

Sepiatone

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I'll just make a joke that a film isn't a classic until it's released in the Criterion collection.

That comment may have actually held some water for me until somewhat recently.  Feels like some films are being shoe-horned in that were just released.  I had a professor at film school back in 2003, make the comment that they didn't like how Wes Anderson films were immediately released on Criterion.  I guess at least I loved those Wes Anderson films.

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2 hours ago, TopBilled said:

This thread is a good excuse for me to publicly grapple with something...LOL

Two nights ago I watched MAUDIE (2016) on Hulu. I don't normally watch films from the 2010s, I guess since a lot of them don't appeal to me.

Anyway, I watched MAUDIE because it was about a woman painter from Canada and also because I figured it would be a methodical character study which it certainly was.

So for a day and a half this film has resonated within me..I keep debating if it is actually a classic film, or just a film about a classic subject. I feel the lead actress (Sally Hawkins) is doing some scientific method acting, relying on tricks to convey the woman she is portraying, instead of connecting to the real human side of her. But it is still an effective performance. Ethan Hawke plays the husband and I've never really rated him as an actor but he's decent in this one.

I love the on-location filming in New Foundland and Labrador, and if you stick with it to the end, the film does transport you to somewhere special. 

I am still reluctant to call it a classic, not because it was only made six years ago, but because I am not sure if I will still be enamored with it six years from now.

***

Incidentally, I think it's a film that could easily air on TCM as it would fit a theme on real life painters. It is also a story about a woman's spirit persevering, which would dovetail nicely with some of TCM's feminist agenda.

In my mind, I define a classic as a film I think I will still like and think as well of in, say 15 years from now, and therefore, presumably, it will stand the test of time. If I believe that it didn't just happened to hit the right spot a that given time, or it won't feel dated as the years pass, then it's a classic for me. That goes for any movie made in any year. Although, yes, the traditional classics have already proven it, that doesn't exclude young movies. I remember when AFI named their top 100 films of all time (I think I'm remembering right. lol), and they included Pulp Fiction. There were people who were up in arms, but I have to say that I think they were right  recognizing it as an "instant classic". It was obvious to them that it would be seen as great for years, or generations to come.

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Have I ever told you folks about that little idea I came up with a while back and that's about how the powers-that-be at this website should create a separate forum section with the title of "TCM Programing Complaints / If You Don't Like What We're Showing Lately, Here's Where You Should Submit Your Thoughts"   ???

And of course, because then those out there who are not familiar with what the dearly departed Robert Osborne said the VERY first day that TCM began broadcasting will have their own very special little place to post this VERY sort of VERY regularly offered up sentiment about what they think about TCM's programing, and instead of posting their complaints in this "General Discussion" forum! And of course because AGAIN, these VERY sorts of semi-regularly offered up thoughts by new poster are NOT really elicited by them in order to conjure up "discussions" about movies, BUT are actually and in reality - wait for it - COMPLAINTS that some of TCM's viewership want to get off their chest, you see! And because once again AGAIN, these almost ALWAYS come from people who really DON'T want to "discuss" the movies that TCM are showing, but instead just what to vent their frustrations about what they feel is TCM's lack of programing ONLY "old movies"!

(...OH, you say I HAVE told you folks about this little idea of mine before?...well then in THAT case, I must ask the aforementioned "powers-that-be" around here, WHY HAVE YOU DELAYED IN DOING THIS, HUH???!!!)

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Here are just three films from the 80's and 90's, I saw in the theatre on their first release, I would label an "INSTANT CLASSIC".  I'm pretty sure that's just the tip of the iceberg cause those three were right off the top of my head.

RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK (1981)

WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT? (1988)

SCHINDLER'S LIST (1993)

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Just last week, I believe, I was thinking it was getting to be a long time since we've had one of these threads.  I was kinda missing it.  Not too many, mind you.  Just enough to get the reassurance someone was still trying to stir up controversy on the site, that we'd not been forgotten in our obscure corner of the internet.  It'd be disheartening. 

Well, now we have a newbie, or a onebie, or a fewbie, who posts once, and is never heard from again, leaving others to do his work for him--her work for her. 

Whenever I see one of these threads, I am reminded of hearing or reading someone describe James Thurber's character as someone who would relish dropping a cat in the middle of the Westminster dog show.

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1 hour ago, yanceycravat said:

Here are just three films from the 80's and 90's, I saw in the theatre on their first release, I would label an "INSTANT CLASSIC".  I'm pretty sure that's just the tip of the iceberg cause those three were right off the top of my head.

RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK (1981)

WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT? (1988)

SCHINDLER'S LIST (1993)

I agree. I also think it's the tip of the iceberg. 40 years don't go by without a slew of fantastic movies being made. Here's a few I thought of in just 30 minutes time:

Raging Bull ('80)

Ordinary People ('80)

Absence Of Malice (’81)

Sophie’s Choice (’83)

The Big Chill (’83)

The Natural (’84)

The Untouchables (’87)

Rain Man (‘88)

Goodfellas ('90)

My Cousin Vinny (’92)

A Few Good Men (’92)

Unforgiven ('92)

A Bronx Tale (’93)

Pulp Fiction ('94)

Forest Gump (’94)

The Shawshank Redemption (’94)

The Usual Suspects (’95)

Saving Private Ryan (‘98)

The Matrix (’99)

The Sixth Sense (’99)

 

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2 hours ago, yanceycravat said:

Here are just three films from the 80's and 90's, I saw in the theatre on their first release, I would label an "INSTANT CLASSIC".  I'm pretty sure that's just the tip of the iceberg cause those three were right off the top of my head.

 

1 hour ago, LuckyDan said:

Umm. 

That's funny. 

 

1 hour ago, slaytonf said:

Just last week, I believe, I was thinking it was getting to be a long time since we've had one of these threads.  I was kinda missing it.  Not too many, mind you.  Just enough to get the reassurance someone was still trying to stir up controversy on the site, that we'd not been forgotten in our obscure corner of the internet.  It'd be disheartening. 

Well, now we have a newbie, or a onebie, or a fewbie, who posts once, and is never heard from again, leaving others to do his work for him--her work for her. 

Whenever I see one of these threads, I am reminded of hearing or reading someone describe James Thurber's character as someone who would relish dropping a cat in the middle of the Westminster dog show.

Nope Dan, and nothing against Yancey here, but what SLAYTON wrote here is funny!

(...especially that oh-so fittingly used in this case description of James Thurber)

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5 hours ago, yanceycravat said:

Here are just three films from the 80's and 90's, I saw in the theatre on their first release, I would label an "INSTANT CLASSIC".  I'm pretty sure that's just the tip of the iceberg cause those three were right off the top of my head.

RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK (1981)

WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT? (1988)

SCHINDLER'S LIST (1993)

Would you also consider TITANIC among the tip of the iceberg films?

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I don't know if it qualified as an "instant classic" but I sure enjoyed Die Hard (1988) when I saw it at the show. Today I think of it as a classic since it holds up so damn well, even with the zillion action films of the same type made before and since.

Burbanked — its-strictly-business: Top 100 Favorite Movies:...

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For the record, I'll now be a Threebie, and promise to avoid another 8917 posts just so I can be considered wholly boorish.

Also for the record, I should have defined my terms. I consider a Classic movie to be from the Classic period, which I define as beginning at the dawn of talkies, and just nibbling a bit at the dawn of the 60s. That's my mileage, narrow as it might be. YMMV.

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1 hour ago, Redlineman said:

For the record, I'll now be a Threebie, and promise to avoid another 8917 posts just so I can be considered wholly boorish.

Also for the record, I should have defined my terms. I consider a Classic movie to be from the Classic period, which I define as beginning at the dawn of talkies, and just nibbling a bit at the dawn of the 60s. That's my mileage, narrow as it might be. YMMV.

For the first time in recorded history, we have  someone who has followed up on their original post.  I can now feel secure this is an actual person and not an agent provocateur, and worthy of a response, for what it's worth.  My response:

TCM is not now, and has never been, exclusively about movies from the studio era.  This is not my assertion.  It is Robert Osborne's, the creator ( I think I can say that) of TCM.  As people have repeatedly been reminded about his original introduction, TCM is about showing movies with stars from yesteryear, and the "stars of today," to paraphrase him.

TCM has also not changed anything about its programming.  It is showing the same mix of older and contemporary movies it always has.  Naturally, movies made since TCM started some 25 years ago are shown, because, unlike people (and I include myself), time marches on.

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3 hours ago, Redlineman said:

For the record, I'll now be a Threebie, and promise to avoid another 8917 posts just so I can be considered wholly boorish.

Also for the record, I should have defined my terms. I consider a Classic movie to be from the Classic period, which I define as beginning at the dawn of talkies, and just nibbling a bit at the dawn of the 60s. That's my mileage, narrow as it might be. YMMV.

 

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