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June 2022 Schedule Up-- Judy Garland SOTM


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She also died in June (1969), so it's doubly appropriate. I'm sure we'll have seen everything before, which is understandable since TCM has been here for over 25 years and Judy was one of the biggest classic movie stars. I wouldn't object to a few examples of her television work from her network specials and her weekly series (if judiciously chosen), to give some variety to what is a pretty familiar menu. There's also a good documentary from PBS' American Masters series (Judy Garland: By Myself) which features voice actors using the words of Judy herself and of a number of associates. 

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So pleased that La Nuit de Varennes (1982) is being shown. It's one of my favorite films, with one of Marcello Mastroianni's greatest (and most moving) performances, as the aging Casanova. Directed by Ettore Scola, the cast also includes Jean-Louis Barrault, Hanna Schuygulla, Harvey Keitel, Jean-Claude Brialy, Andrea Ferreol, Laura Betti, and Daniel Gelin. A beautiful movie, with a great score.

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So excited to see Judy!  I didn't see "The Wizard of Oz" on the schedule - just a documentary about making this movie.  Wish TCM would air this movie along with the other great movies Judy Garland appeared in.

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Judy Garland's first movie was 1936's Pigskin Parade, and although she hits all the right notes, it's rather hard to watch today.  After a few more black & white musicals and a couple of films with Mickey Rooney (Andy Hardy, Babes in Arms) she hit it really big with 1939's The Wizard of Oz.  The 1940's was her best decade for movies with more black and whites:  another  Andy Hardy, Strike Up the Band, Babes on Broadway, Ziegfeld Girl, For Me and My Gal, Girl Crazy, Presenting Lily Mars, until MGM got wise and starred her once again in  Technicolor in one of her best---1944's Meet Me in St. Louis.  Followed by The Clock and another Technicolor blockbuster, The Harvey Girls (1946).  After cameo songs in two musicals,  she starred in Easter Parade (1948) and In the Good Old Summer Time (1949).  Then the hard times began.  She dropped out of 1950's Annie Get Your Gun because of illness, but managed to struggle through Summer Stock that year.  After the musical wrapped, she was called back about two months later to film one more big production number, "Get Happy," that many critics regard as the best number she ever filmed in her career.  Never mind, that she had gone on a crash diet and looked very trim compared to the rest of the movie.  She was called back from vacation for Royal Wedding in 1951, after June Allyson dropped out because of her pregnancy.  Judy did her wardrobe tests and began rehearsals with Fred Astaire, then called in sick several days in a row.  MGM fired her for good this time and she was replaced by Jane Powell.  Judy's movie career came to a halt until her producer husband Sid Luft decided to produce A Star is Born for Warner Bros, released in 1954.  Considered a shoo-in for the Oscar, she lost to Grace Kelly (The Country Girl).  She had just gone through a very difficult birth of her youngest and was still in the hospital the night of the awards.  Her career gained momentum with her live performances at the Palace in NYC.  She received a supporting Oscar nod for 1961's Judgement at Nuremberg, received positive reviews for A Child is Waiting (1963) along with star Burt Lancaster, and  that same year for the British dramatic musical, I Could Go on Singing.  Even though her voice was as good as ever, this was her last film.

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5 hours ago, Toto said:

So excited to see Judy!  I didn't see "The Wizard of Oz" on the schedule - just a documentary about making this movie.  Wish TCM would air this movie along with the other great movies Judy Garland appeared in.

Pretty sure they only show it on TCM once or twice a year. That said, it is curious that it is not on the schedule.

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You may have noticed there is a 2-hour gap in the schedule on June 10 starting at 8 pm, just prior to the Wizard of Oz documentary, which would be a logical place for TCM to schedule Wizard of Oz (1939) itself.  Since June 10 is also Judy’s 100th birthday, however, they may choose to do something different instead, so we’ll have to wait and see how the schedule is completed.  There is also a gap after The Clock (1945) is shown at 1 am which could be used for additional Judy Garland films if TCM decides to forgo TCM Underground that evening.

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2 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Pretty sure they only show it on TCM once or twice a year. That said, it is curious that it is not on the schedule.

But the 1925 silent version is on the schedule (Midnight, June 5), unrelated to Judy's SOTM, I assume.

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Can never get enough of Judy's titanic performance of "The Man That Got Away" in  "A Star is Born".    Even the outtakes that didn't make it into the film, or versions that they rejected, were such "high-level" Judy.   At least the ones I've seen online--  have a hard time favoring one over the other. 

It looks to me like they're not including "Judgment at Nuremburg",  or maybe I missed noticing it.  I love those raw, late-career performances of hers, like in "Judgment...",   and even in "A Child is Waiting".    They're so delicate, and tremulous, and spot-on and REAL.

TCM most definitely should throw Garland's Christmas special with Liza and Jack Jones, etc. into the mix.    

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There's a really charming Robert Wise film called This Could Be the Night (1957), with Jean Simmons, Paul Douglas, Anthony Franciosa and Joan Blondell as employees at a supper club with musical entertainment. It's not a TCM premier but it doesn't come around often. It also features Neile Adams, a talented actress/singer/dancer who later married Steve Mc Queen, and, my favorite, Julie Wilson, the legendary stage and cabaret performer, who has a couple of numbers and sings the title song, as well as acts a role. Top notch ensemble work by all of them.

I'm also looking forward to Jazz on a Summer's Day (1959), a recording of the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival with Louis Armstrong, Mahalia Jackson, Thelonius Monk, and even Chuck Berry. It's from an era before live performances were routinely filmed, so it's an interesting rarity.

Also, overnight on the 19th/20th there's some programming I'm assuming is meant to coincide with the anniversary of Stonewall. It seems to be focused on the filmmakers themselves rather than simply on films with gay content, which is a different approach than in the past.

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6 hours ago, DougieB said:

There's a really charming Robert Wise film called This Could Be the Night (1957), with Jean Simmons, Paul Douglas, Anthony Franciosa and Joan Blondell as employees at a supper club with musical entertainment. It's not a TCM premier but it doesn't come around often. It also features Neile Adams, a talented actress/singer/dancer who later married Steve Mc Queen, and, my favorite, Julie Wilson, the legendary stage and cabaret performer, who has a couple of numbers and sings the title song, as well as acts a role. Top notch ensemble work by all of them.

I'm also looking forward to Jazz on a Summer's Day (1959), a recording of the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival with Louis Armstrong, Mahalia Jackson, Thelonius Monk, and even Chuck Berry. It's from an era before live performances were routinely filmed, so it's an interesting rarity.

Also, overnight on the 19th/20th there's some programming I'm assuming is meant to coincide with the anniversary of Stonewall. It seems to be focused on the filmmakers themselves rather than simply on films with gay content, which is a different approach than in the past.

Could not agree with you more about "This Could be the Night;" it's great fish-out-of-water story from one of my favorite directors. 

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June 2022 marks the TCM premiere of Gus Van Sant's feature film directorial debut MALA NOCHE.  Like much of Van Sant's work, the movie was shot on location in Portland, Oregon. It was adapted from an autobiographical novel by Portland native Walt Curtis.

MALA NOCHE features the line "You drive like you ****!"  --- which I would use  if the occasion ever arose.

 

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Sorry I didn’t notice this earlier, but TCM has listed the films for Judy’s 100th birthday tribute on June 10 in the Now Playing Guide that was sent on May 1.  The Guide does show Wizard of Oz (1939) at 8 pm, and Judgment at Nuremburg (1961) following The Clock (1945) later that evening.  These 2 films have not officially been added to the schedule yet but it should just be a matter of time before they get around to it.

I have updated my June summary accordingly.

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  • 2 weeks later...

https://www.tcm.com/followthethread

There are still some gaps in the June 2022 schedule, but the forthcoming limited series "Follow the Thread,"exploring fashion in film--probably will fill in these lacunae.

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WHAT a pity TCM can't screen LETTY LYNTON (1932)--Joan Crawford's wardrobe alone would make a substantial episode.

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9 hours ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

WHAT a pity TCM can't screen LETTY LYNTON (1932)--Joan Crawford's wardrobe alone would make a substantial episode.

Your comments piqued my curiosity, so I went to IMDB and discovered the copyright issue related to the film.  IMDB says the conflicting rights will expire in 2025 - it will be interesting to see if the film becomes available shortly afterwards.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0023132/trivia/

The images posted above are very striking indeed.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I really like the June 2022 on TCM montage, with highlights of the month's programming underscored with the song "Fighter" by Joseph.

For those who were wondering if THE WIZARD OF OZ would air as part of Judy Garland's Star Of The Month showcase, the answer is revealed in the final clip in the video.

I'm so excited that Nicholas Ray's JOHNNY GUITAR appears to be airing as part of the Revisionist Westerns spotlight! But I'm  not finding it on the schedule.

Presumably the  LGBTQ Directors spotlight is in June because it's gay pride month. I did not realize the director of 9 TO 5 (Colin Higgins) was gay! Gus Van Sant's MALA NOCHE and John Schlesinger's MIDNIGHT COWBOY are also airing. (I did know those directors were gay.)

 

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They finally added The Wizard of Oz (1939) and a few others to the online schedule early this morning.  There is still a gap in the schedule for 8 pm ET on June 23, so Johnny Guitar will likely be added for that time.  (Not sure why they wait so long to fully complete the listings.)

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14 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

I really like the June 2022 on TCM montage, with highlights of the month's programming underscored with the song "Fighter" by Joseph.

For those who were wondering if THE WIZARD OF OZ would air as part of Judy Garland's Star Of The Month showcase, the answer is revealed in the final clip in the video.

I'm so excited that Nicholas Ray's JOHNNY GUITAR appears to be airing as part of the Revisionist Westerns spotlight! But I'm  not finding it on the schedule.

Presumably the  LGBTQ Directors spotlight is in June because it's gay pride month. I did not realize the director of 9 TO 5 (Colin Higgins) was gay! Gus Van Sant's MALA NOCHE and John Schlesinger's MIDNIGHT COWBOY are also airing. (I did know those directors were gay.)

 

The promo is stunning, as are most of them recently. The creative team at TCM is on full display and they should be proud. At the risk of reviving a controversy, I've adapted to the new "contemporary" graphics too, especially seeing them in combination with such a sharply edited and scored piece as this promo. 

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