Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Judy Garland as SOTM June 2022


TopBilled
 Share

Recommended Posts

This is the fourth time Judy Garland has been TCM's Star of the Month. Previous turns were in 2000, 2004 and 2016. She is now tied with Doris Day and Greta Garbo as the most honored.

Judy was born on June 10, 1922 as Frances Gumm in Grand Rapids, Minnesota.

Judy

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Screen Shot 2021-06-25 at 11.33.54 AM

june 3rd

PIGSKIN PARADE (1936)
BROADWAY MELODY OF 1938 (1937)
EVERYBODY SING (1938)
LISTEN DARLING (1938)
BABES IN ARMS (1939)
BABES ON BROADWAY (1941)
STRIKE UP THE BAND (1940)

june 10th

LITTLE NELLIE KELLY (1940)
ZIEGFELD GIRL (1941)
PRESENTING LILY MARS (1943)
GIRL CRAZY (1943)
FOR ME AND MY GAL (1942)
THE PIRATE (1948)
IN THE GOOD OLD SUMMERTIME (1949)
THE WIZARD OF OZ (1939)
THE WIZARD OF OZ: 50 YEARS OF MAGIC (1990)
MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS (1944)
THE CLOCK (1945)

june 17th

THOROUGHBREDS DON'T CRY (1937)
LOVE FINDS ANDY HARDY (1938)
ANDY HARDY MEETS DEBUTANTE (1940)
LIFE BEGINS FOR ANDY HARDY (1941)
THE HARVEY GIRLS (1946)
EASTER PARADE (1948)
SUMMER STOCK (1950)

june 24th

GAY PURR-EE (1962)
TILL THE CLOUDS ROLL BY (1946)
A STAR IS BORN (1954)
TBA

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, cinemaman said:

The  film  Judgement  At  Nuremberg  1961  needs  to shown   for  Judy  Garland  sotm  tribute.

It's probably the TBA slot on the 24th. They also like to show A CHILD IS WAITING and I COULD GO ON SINGING.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, TopBilled said:

It's probably the TBA slot on the 24th. They also like to show A CHILD IS WAITING and I COULD GO ON SINGING.

I have the CD original soundtrack of "I Could Go on Singing", 1963.

It's her last musical, and some of the best singing she ever did near the end of her life.

What also makes it special is that the same two songwriters who wrote "The Wizard of Oz"--Harold Arlen and Yip Harburg--wrote the numbers for this last musical. 

 Of course, she's literally playing herself. Plus British movie star Dirk Bogarde is great, working in sync with her, matching her acting ability minute per minute.

Judy also gets more than ample support from two showbiz veterans--Jack Klugman and Aline MacMahon. 

All under the watchful eye of famed British director Ronald Neame.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love Judy; always have and always will and I know I'll be dipping in and out of the programming during the month, but I'm strangely unmoved to cheer about this lineup. Even TCM viewers who aren't hardcore Judy fans are by now probably pretty familiar with her body of work, so it basically becomes as much a matter of what's being left out as it is of what's included. Three Andy Hardy movies, even though all the Rooney/Garland musical features are already represented? I can't help feeling that at least one (maybe two?) of them is taking up space which could be better used later. Is Gay Purr-ee seriously the only post-A Star Is Born film on the schedule when, as others have mentioned, there's no sign (granted, there's that TBA) of Judgement at Nuremberg, A Child Is Waiting and I Could Go on Singing? In popular movie lore much has been made of Judy's melt-down at MGM during productions of Annie Get Your Gun and Royal Wedding, as well as the idea that A Star is Born was a make-or-break moment which marked the end of her bankability in the industry. Looking at the SOTM lineup as it now stands, there's no evidence that Judy actually persevered and subsequently turned in three very strong performances in respectable major films, even resulting in an Academy Award nomination for one. On the contrary, it tends to confirm the old trope that she was finished in Hollywood, a definite disservice to her legacy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I, too, love judy; have been watching her films and listening to her recordings for more than 50 years.  I have been looking forward to the June 2022  celebration for a couple of years.  I recently got a DVD copy of A CHILD IS WAITING (don't see it on TCM too often), a truly wonderful film, from 1963. Judy was  quite popular and doing well that year; she finished a great concert tour that ended at Carnegie Hall in April 1961; then,  in 1962 she did a fabulous TV special with Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin which is fairly close to the Carnegie Hall concert!  I remember in 1982 (twenty years after it originally aired on TV), several people told me that TV special  was still the best thing that ever came on television! Judy is terrific in A CHILD IS WAITING and the film was way ahead of it's time.  I am disappointed that TCM is not including A CHILD IS WAITING in the schedule.  

I would also like to see TCM show some of Judy's surviving short subjects like BUBBLES and EVERY SUNDAY, and perhaps the surviving footage from her work in ANNIE GET YOUR GUN (the film with Betty Hutton is very good, but it would have been fabulous with Judy).

Perhaps we shouldn't jump to conclusions because schedule on June 24 has a TBA...  maybe we'll see some additions there.  

In any event, the 100th Birthday of this wonderful woman,  undoubtedly one of the most talented artists of all time, is truly a terrific event. I will be looking at her films again throughout the month of June 2022, listening to her unbelievable Decca (some of those early tracks are nothing short of phenomenal) tracks and her Capitol recordings.  This was one great lady and she left us way too soon!

 

 

judy-listen.png

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're so right to mention her recording legacy (both Decca and Capitol). I know a case can be made for Frank Sinatra, but to my mind Judy is the premier example of an artist with equal histories of excellence in the fields of film and of recording and concert performance. Even given that in her final years her reputation was somewhat affected by professional unreliability, I don't think her stature was ever seriously diminished. (If she had lived longer it may have been another story.) As film work started to evaporate she began to lay the groundwork for a  recording and performing career which sustained her (and her fans) and led to personal triumph and an enduring legacy. I'll be breaking out her recordings during June too. (I lean toward the Capitol recordings myself.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, DougieB said:

You're so right to mention her recording legacy (both Decca and Capitol). I know a case can be made for Frank Sinatra, but to my mind Judy is the premier example of an artist with equal histories of excellence in the fields of film and of recording and concert performance. Even given that in her final years her reputation was somewhat affected by professional unreliability, I don't think her stature was ever seriously diminished. (If she had lived longer it may have been another story.) As film work started to evaporate she began to lay the groundwork for a  recording and performing career which sustained her (and her fans) and led to personal triumph and an enduring legacy. I'll be breaking out her recordings during June too. (I lean toward the Capitol recordings myself.)

While I can't think of another female performer that as a triple-threat legacy like Judy,   I admit I haven't listened to many of her recordings.    Did she swing?  I know from the T.V. show it was mostly ballots and even on the more up tempo numbers they were not done in a swing style.      That is what I love about Frank.   Of course he could do the ballots but man could Frank swing! 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

While I can't think of another female performer that as a triple-threat legacy like Judy,   I admit I haven't listened to many of her recordings.    Did she swing?  I know from the T.V. show it was mostly ballots and even on the more up tempo numbers they were not done in a swing style.      That is what I love about Frank.   Of course he could do the ballots but man could Frank swing! 

 

I'll have to defer to you, Mr. Jazzguitar, as to what actually constitutes swing. I'm one of those I-know-what-I-like people who can't really discuss it in technical terms. Judy recorded two albums for Capitol with arrangements by Nelson Riddle, Judy (1956) and Judy in Love (1958). As you know, Riddle was largely responsible for a long string of Sinatra's Capitol albums in the 1950's, such as Songs for Swingin' Lovers and Sinatra's Swingin' Session. Riddle also did arrangements for a couple of dynamite Ella Fitzgerald albums, Ella Swings Lightly with Nelson and Ella Swings Brightly with Nelson, as well as a number of albums for Nat King Cole. Some of Judy's work with Riddle, such as Life is Just a Bowl of Cherries, Day In and Day Out, and his arrangement of Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart seem to me to swing but, as I said, I don't have the expertise to definitively categorize the music. I particularly like her version of Comes Once in a Lifetime, which was recorded at some legendary London sessions and was released as a single in 1961; it's certainly jaunty and upbeat, if not downright swingin'.

When Judy's concert career took off she was largely arranged by Mort Lindsey, who also worked with her on her TV series, and it may be that these more traditional (and more "theatrical") arrangements, with more of a focus on power ballads and upbeat showstoppers, are what Judy is best known for today, but on the evidence of her studio recordings for Capitol I'd say, yes, Judy could swing.

I remember TCM showing that short she did with Deanna Durbin (I forget what it's called; it's set in a park) in which Deanna sang the song "straight" and Judy scatted and riffed, so it seems that right from the beginning Judy was branded as "hep".

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see a few movies listed I've yet to see.  Looking forward to those.  Thanks for sharing that list.  Does TCM ever show any early Judy movies where she's Frances Gumm?  Would love to see those!

Lori

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As you probably know, The Gumm Sisters appeared as a trio in several films, revue-type movies where they were part of a bill. A few are lost but TCM has shown excerpts from a couple of them and I wouldn't be surprised if they do again, probably as interstitials between films, so there's probably no way to know where they'll come in the programming. They're also on YouTube, I don't think Frances ever appeared on film as a solo act. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/27/2022 at 10:17 PM, TopBilled said:

This is the fourth time Judy Garland has been TCM's Star of the Month. Previous turns were in 2000, 2004 and 2016. She is now tied with Doris Day and Greta Garbo as the most honored.

Judy was born on June 10, 1922 as Frances Gumm in Grand Rapids, Minnesota.

Judy

I'm guessing because this year is her 100th birthday and no one has a more quintessentially Old Hollywood story like she had.

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...