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Best Horror Movies on Netflix Right Now......


mr6666
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"...........Horror films remain perennially popular, despite periodic (and always exaggerated) rumors of their demise, even in the face of steadily declining ticket sales and desperately shifting models of distribution.

Into the new millennium, horror films have retained their power to shock and outrage by continuing to plumb our deepest primordial terrors and incarnate our sickest, most socially unpalatable fantasies. They are, in what amounts to a particularly delicious irony, a “safe space” in which we can explore these otherwise unfathomable facets of our true selves, while yet consoling ourselves with the knowledge that “it’s only a movie.”

At the same time, the genre manages to find fresh and powerful metaphors for where we’re at as a society and how we endure fractious, fearful times. For every eviscerated remake or toothless throwback, there’s a startlingly fresh take on the genre’s most time-honored tropes; for every milquetoast PG-13 compromise, there’s a ferocious take-no-prisoners attempt to push the envelope on what we can honestly say about ourselves. And some of our favorites are currently streaming on Netflix.......

https://www.slantmagazine.com/film/best-horror-movies-on-netflix-streaming/

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16 hours ago, mr6666 said:

Into the new millennium, horror films have retained their power to shock and outrage . . .

. . . and inspire pretentious, pseudo-intellectual, Cahiers du Cinéma-style analysis and claptrap-commentary:

     "Guillero del Toro’s decision to explicitly underline the weaknesses of his proxy in Crimson Peak belatedly exposes prior stand-ins as equally shortsighted,
       and in the process he clarifies a thematic through line of his filmography . . . When social and historical context finally breach his microcosm, they expose
      the rifts of immaturity and sadness of a child who knows it’s time to grow up but cannot face adulthood." -- Jake Cole

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Whatever.

But, what is Crimson Peak about, Mr. Cole? What is the plot?

The Horror Film remains my favorite movie genre. But my preference is for the "classic," "old school" era (which for me is the 1920s through the mid-1970s). Of the list compiled by Slant magazine, only Crimson Peak (which I like but not as much as I wanted to like it) is in my movie collection. Stephen King's plebian, populist brand of suburban horror fiction (killer cars, killer pets, killer kids) never appealed to me -- movie and TV adaptations of his stories even less so. John Carpenter -- highly regarded as a "Master of Horror" -- I always considered overrated, indeed second-rate. Ditto Wes Craven.

IMO, the modern horror film has become a ghetto of femme-centric, women's empowerment potboilers that neither interest nor appeal to me. No longer a Netflix subscriber, I am not persuaded and enticed to restore my membership based on Slant's promotions.

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On 5/15/2022 at 4:27 PM, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

. . . and inspire pretentious, pseudo-intellectual, Cahiers du Cinéma-style analysis and claptrap-commentary:

     "Guillero del Toro’s decision to explicitly underline the weaknesses of his proxy in Crimson Peak belatedly exposes prior stand-ins as equally shortsighted,
       and in the process he clarifies a thematic through line of his filmography . . . When social and historical context finally breach his microcosm, they expose
      the rifts of immaturity and sadness of a child who knows it’s time to grow up but cannot face adulthood." -- Jake Cole

1I=&risl=&pid=ImgRaw&r=0

Whatever.

But, what is Crimson Peak about, Mr. Cole? What is the plot?

The Horror Film remains my favorite movie genre. But my preference is for the "classic," "old school" era (which for me is the 1920s through the mid-1970s). Of the list compiled by Slant magazine, only Crimson Peak (which I like but not as much as I wanted to like it) is in my movie collection. Stephen King's plebian, populist brand of suburban horror fiction (killer cars, killer pets, killer kids) never appealed to me -- movie and TV adaptations of his stories even less so. John Carpenter -- highly regarded as a "Master of Horror" -- I always considered overrated, indeed second-rate. Ditto Wes Craven.

IMO, the modern horror film has become a ghetto of femme-centric, women's empowerment potboilers that neither interest nor appeal to me. No longer a Netflix subscriber, I am not persuaded and enticed to restore my membership based on Slant's promotions.

I'm with you on "Crimson Peak" it's beautiful but the plot left me cold- there are way too  may remakes now even of films that are not that good to begin with "Firestastater" ?!   And why another remake of "Salem's Lot" 

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4 hours ago, jaragon said:

 . . . there are way too  may remakes now even of films that are not that good to begin with "Firestastater" ?!   And why another remake of "Salem's Lot" 

I have read only one Stephen King work: The Shining. As I recall, I enjoyed it (King's likening of his three protagonists as "microbes trapped in the intestine of a monster" stuck with me)  . . . but not enough to become hooked on King's fiction.

I was unimpressed with the, to me, banality of some of King's book titles,  Firestarter being a perfect example. It's like titling Dracula "Neck Biter," Moby Dick "Big Whale," or I Sing the Body Electric "Body Love."

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6 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

I have read only one Stephen King work: The Shining. As I recall, I enjoyed it (King's likening of his three protagonists as "microbes trapped in the intestine of a monster" stuck with me)  . . . but not enough to become hooked on King's fiction.

I was unimpressed with the, to me, banality of some of King's book titles,  Firestarter being a perfect example. It's like titling Dracula "Neck Biter," Moby Dick "Big Whale," or I Sing the Body Electric "Body Love."

King has some great books like "Carrie" but a lot of over rated stuff

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I've only read a handful of King's novels: CarrieSalem's LotChristineCycle of the WerewolfThinnerMisery, and Needful Things. I've avoided his other popular novels, though I really couldn't say why. I like many of his short stories, and have read several collections of those.

I believe that I've seen all of the film and TV adaptations of his stuff, though, and that's a decidedly mixed bag. Of those, the ones I liked included:

  • The Shining (1980)
  • The Shawshank Redemption (1994)
  • The Mist (2007)
  • The Green Mile (1999)
  • Carrie (1976)
  • Doctor Sleep (2019)
  • Misery (1990)
  • The Dead Zone (1983)
  • It: Part One (2017)
  • Stand By Me (1986)
  • Gerald's Game (2017)
  • Christine (1983)
  • Secret Window (2004)
  • Firestarter (1984)
  • Creepshow (1982)
  • Dolores Claiborne (1995)
  • Apt Pupil (1998)
  • Big Driver (2014)
  • Salem's Lot (1979)
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