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Francis Albert Sinatra


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> {quote:title=cinemafan wrote:}{quote}

> This is too much! Love it.

> > Kidling Frank, already knew how to dress back then...

> > 2jb8f15.jpg

 

I'm amazed how his whole "look" is already down pat. I've seen pictures of young

men and boys from that era, but it just looks like a miniature Frank right from his

prime.

 

>There are others, but one of my favorites is You Make Me Feel So Young

 

I do love that song, too. No one sings it quite so convincingly.

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He sure was handsome in that photo. There is a young person in my life who is just beginning to discover and appreciate Frank Sinatra, and he enjoyed that photo of him as a young dandy.

Thanks -there will never be anyone like him. One of a kind indeed.

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> {quote:title=cinemafan wrote:}{quote}

> He sure was handsome in that photo. There is a young person in my life who is just beginning to discover and appreciate Frank Sinatra, and he enjoyed that photo of him as a young dandy.

> Thanks -there will never be anyone like him. One of a kind indeed.

 

Really???? I'm always excited to hear about someone younger getting into the classics,

especially if it's one of my favorites, ha!

 

I was listening to the Come Fly With Me album on my way to work. It's such

an uplifting collection of tunes, loosely organized around the theme of travel and

featuring really kicky and distinctive Billy May arrangements. I like some of the

silly lyrics and the way Frank would sometimes play around with them. For instance,

in "Isle of Capri" instead of saying "she wore a lovely ring on her finger" he says

"she wore a lovely meatball on her finger", hahaahaha!

 

"Come Fly With Me" is also the ringtone on my cell phone. :)

 

frankfaceic2.jpg

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It's been years since I saw it, but if I'm not mistaken at the start of "Young at Heart" with Doris Day, he played the John Garfield role, Sinatra starts walking toward the camera singing the title song with a blue sky behind him. His recording of "Young at Heart" had hit the charts and put him back in the pop charts after a long dry spell.They had not yet titled the film, a remake of the 1930's film "Four Daughters", and with the success of the song they decided to call it "Young at Heart" and I think they ended the film the same way but this time Sinatra turns and walks away from the camera while singing, I'm think.....

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Greetings, Fredsie!

 

You're right about the ending, only I think Frank is inside the house, singing happily with his wife and baby and the camera pulls back in a crane shot overlooking the street where they live while he sings "Young at Heart". I always thought the juxtoposition (clash?) of the bright, cheery suburban milieu with Frank's decidedly noirish character was really strange. But still, I like the movie and I love seeing Frank and Doris together. My favorite scenes are Frank singing in the dingy barroom.

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My Dear Goddess, this film I believe started Frank 's style of the loner with a cigarette and the hat tilted back singing a "One for my baby" type songs that stayed with him through the rest of his career. A style which worked so well for him.It's been about 20 years or more since I saw this film....

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Oh, I love that movie, fred! You wouldn't think so, but Doris and Frank have great chemistry. He is at his best there- like a wounded puppy. Very different from Garfield's version, but just as good.

 

And I think if I had to pick, that would be my favorite Sinatra song - *Young at Heart* just IS Frank to me. It's not the best recording ever made, but it's soooo evocative of that time for me. There is something so innocent about it.

 

This one too:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOPDI03gmUw

 

This is my favorite of his late night songs, His voice is so smoky, yet beautiful, and the arrangement! Magnifique....!

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqmgldSVgXM

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They were great together, but Frank and Doris Day's husband was quite the opposite. They did not like each other and Sinatra had Martin Melcher banned from the set. Melcher had wanted Day to sing the title song over the closing credits and Sinatra was going to do the singing. Sinatra won. Also the daughters were changed from 4 to 3 and Sinatra did not want his character to die in the end as Garfield had done in the original.Sinatra won...

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> {quote:title=fredbaetz wrote:}{quote}

> My Dear Goddess, this film I believe started Frank 's style of the loner with a cigarette and the hat tilted back singing a "One for my baby" type songs that stayed with him through the rest of his career. A style which worked so well for him.It's been about 20 years or more since I saw this film....

 

I believe you're right! And that whole style stood out so from the rest of the proceedings.

The blueprint was also there in Meet Danny Wilson (1951).

 

Didn't Doris mention in her memoirs that what set Sinatra off on Melcher was

MM wanted to control the songs used on the picture to ensure he got all the royalties?

That would make any singer flip, much less a short-fuse like Frank.

 

mike.jpg

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> {quote:title=fredbaetz wrote:}{quote}

> And we all know what happened to Doris when he died and she started looking over her investments and bank accounts. He was a piece of work....

 

Not a happily ever after for poor Doris, that's for sure. I sure wish TCM could convince

her to sit down with Mr. Osborne. What stories she could tell if she only wished to!

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I remember when I was working on the AFI James Cagney Tribute and the producer wanted her to go on stage and sing a song to Cagney. They had worked in 2 films together "The West Point Story" and the wonderful "Love Me or Leave Me". Well she refused, because she said she didn't want to sing on stage. But she would be glad to say something to Jimmy from her table. Well I had just screened "Love Me...." and told the producer that she sang "You Made Me Love You" in the film and there were shots of Cagney watching her sing.So that's what we did, she stood up and said she" had the honor of working with Jimmy in 2 films and I think I said it best on how I feel about him in LMOLM" then they rolled the clip. It went over great. You forget what a great voice she had and could she put over a song. But with all the comedies she did and moved away from the musicals you do forget how wonderful she was.

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It's very interesting that you have talked about Doris Day, because the similarities to Sinatra are very strong, to me anyway.

 

Both started as band singers. Both became hugely popular movie stars. Each became the most popular male and female singers of the1950's and 1960's. And each one's singing style changed over time.

 

I am always amazed to listen to early recordings of Day:

 

 

 

 

 

She sounds quite different from the Doris Day with the smile in her voice of Que Sera Sera:

 

 

 

Frank Sinatra is also fascinating to me as a singer, because his voice changes, too, between the forties:

 

 

 

 

 

and the fifties:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hg5N3yr71XE

 

Another thing that is similar about the two performers is the way we take them for granted nowadays. fred, you are right, people don't really realize how good either one of them were.

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hi Jackie! I like your comparisons, it makes it even more apparent how wonderful it would have been had they been paired again in another kind of movie.

 

In the early days...

dorisfrank3.jpg

 

Young at Heart

dorisfrank2.jpg

 

dorisfrank.jpg

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