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It might be gone before you know it!  ;) 

 

Pulling Anne Frank from schools? Well, let's yank these 10 books also

At long last, good, wholesome Americans are taking on the country's most notorious dens of iniquity: school libraries.

Books that could be gateways to thinking are being challenged, marked with warning labels or pulled off school library shelves. Liberals, of course, are treating this perfectly reasonable censorship as if it's some hysterical faux-moral-panic. Well, I've got news for you, libs: There's nothing hysterical about our fauxmoral- panic.

Meet the latest book enemies

We have seen the enemy and, in the Keller Independent School District in Texas, it's a graphic novel version of Anne Frank's “The Diary of a Young Girl.”

In the Collier County School District in Florida, more than 100 books have been slapped with advisory labels that read “this book has been identified by some community members as unsuitable for students.” One of them is the illustrated children's book “Everywhere Babies” by Susan Meyers and Marla Frazee, featuring a couple of drawings of same-sex parents that might indoctrinate our children into believing it's OK to love whom you love.

The nays of Texas are upon you

PEN America, a so-called 'literary and free expression organization,' put out a report in April detailing how successful we've been at protecting our children from knowledge. It found “1,586 book bans that have occurred in 86 school districts in 26 states between July 1, 2021 and March 31” and noted: “Texas led the country with the most bans at 713; followed by Pennsylvania (456); Florida (204); Oklahoma (43); Kansas (30); and Tennessee (16).”

The last thing we need is to have our kids “learning” about “things” that might make them (or us) feel in any way uncomfortable or challenge our view of the world.

We're the victims here!

Things like gender identity, sexuality or (gasp!) critical race theory, which is a thing I definitely understand and can define, have no place in the minds of kids who are attempting to understand themselves and the world around them.

10 other books to ban IMMEDIATELY!

With that in mind, here are 10 other books that should be immediately BANNED from all school libraries.

1. “Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austen. For starters, “pride” is a known LGBTQ term. And “prejudice” might make my white child feel guilt, which is an unacceptable emotion. So you want to expose my kid to both pride AND prejudice? I don't think so!

2. “The Black Stallion” by Walter Farley. Clearly the liberals have found a way to sneak critical race theory into an otherwise decent story about a horse.

3. “The Brothers Karamazov” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. Nice try, commies.

4. “Invisible Man” by Ralph Ellison. Presumably another feminist attempt to silence American men. We will not tolerate such wokeness.

5. “It” by Stephen King. Oh, for Pete's sake, the title is a darn pronoun. I see what you're up to, Stephen King. We all know pronouns can lead young people to explore and eventually embrace their true identities. Not on my watch!

6. “The Sun Also Rises” by Ernest Hemingway. Sounds like some kind of climate change propaganda. Add it to the burn pile.

7. “Moby-Dick” by Herman Melville. This one's self-explanatory.

8. “The Canterbury Tales” by Geoffrey Chaucer. Brimming with filth and perversion. Also promotes the acceptance of iambic pentameter, better known as “Satan's rhyming pattern.”

9. “The Count of Monte Cristo” by Alexandre Dumas. Sounds both foreign and vaguely gay.

10. “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury. Adystopian tale of a future America in which books have been outlawed and are rounded up and burned by “firemen” who enforce the laws and ... on second thought, let's keep this one.

Follow USA TODAY columnist Rex Huppke on Twitter @RexHuppke and Facebook: facebook.com/RexIsAJerk

 
 

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It is their school district teaching their kids.     

These folks are nuts but what type of solution should their be?   A Federal review  board that OK's each school districts book selection?   (because every school districts "bans" book and has since the first school was ever created).

Would Dems here be OK with such a  Federal review board if it was lead by DeVos (or any Trump appointee,  or DeSantis appointee?).

In other words,  this is another outrage thread without substance.

 

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58 minutes ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

It is their school district teaching their kids.     

These folks are nuts but what type of solution should their be?   A Federal review  board that OK's each school districts book selection?   (because every school districts "bans" book and has since the first school was ever created).

Would Dems here be OK with such a  Federal review board if it was lead by DeVos (or any Trump appointee,  or DeSantis appointee?).

In other words,  this is another outrage thread without substance.

 

You're right.  Book bans and the like have been going on forever.  So have protests against them.  It's just that these arguments used to take place at school board meetings or other local meetings, whereas now everyone must shout about it on social media.  That's the only difference.

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Should have linked the reason for your post.

Texas school district pulls Anne Frank’s diary, Bible from shelves after complaints

https://nypost.com/2022/08/17/bible-among-controversial-books-banned-by-dallas-area-school-district/

 

When it comes to school libraries, books should be catagorized by age.  Yes some content may be inappropriate for very young children (language, sex topics). Would you want your 5-10 year old to read about rape, incest, beastiality? Vulgar language?

The Diary of Anne Frank is recommended for children 11 and older.

https://www.commonsensemedia.org/book-reviews/anne-frank-the-diary-of-a-young-girl/user-reviews/adult

Not calling for censorship just common sense regarding age sensitive material.

 

The book cover is a bit confusing...people are stunned she's writing a diary? :blink:

uh wasn't that done in SECRET??

keller-texas-school-book-030.jpg

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At first I thought you meant to read your comment while I can. Expecting controversial subject matter, I of course clicked. Yes, this is awful. If you don't LIKE a book, then don't READ the book!  And if the author of that article - or anybody - understands exactly what critical race theory is, I wish that they would explain it to me!

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24 minutes ago, hamradio said:

Should have linked the reason for your post.

Texas school district pulls Anne Frank’s diary, Bible from shelves after complaints

https://nypost.com/2022/08/17/bible-among-controversial-books-banned-by-dallas-area-school-district/

 

When it comes to school libraries, books should be catagorized by age.  Yes some content may be inappropriate for very young children (language, sex topics). Would you want your 5-10 year old to read about rape, incest, beastiality? Vulgar language?

The Diary of Anne Frank is recommended for children 11 and older.

https://www.commonsensemedia.org/book-reviews/anne-frank-the-diary-of-a-young-girl/user-reviews/adult

Not calling for censorship just common sense regarding age sensitive material.

 

The book cover is a bit confusing...people are stunned she's writing a diary? :blink:

uh wasn't that done in SECRET??

keller-texas-school-book-030.jpg

The "stunned" people in the drawing are her family members and friends of the family that hid in the attic.  The red and white checked diary was a birthday gift.  The family went into hiding about a month after she started keeping the diary, when her older sister got a summons to report to a Nazi work camp in Germany.

BTW, those are glasses on her sister, Margot.

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4 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

The "stunned" people in the drawing are her family members and friends of the family that hid in the attic.  The red and white checked diary was a birthday gift.  The family went into hiding about a month after she started keeping the diary, when her older sister got a summons to report to a Nazi work camp in Germany.

BTW, those are glasses on her sister, Margot.

Odd the family is looking back with such  expressions.

If eyeglasses make my eyes look like that, seek a better optometrist :blink:;)

 

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53 minutes ago, LsDoorMat said:

And if the author of that article - or anybody - understands exactly what critical race theory is, I wish that they would explain it to me!

You could read this, but I'm sure you know that.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_race_theory

Just a swift perusal will illustrate why the idea that this is taught in elementary schools is laughable. It's largely a university-level course, specifically in advanced legal and sociology studies.

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

You're right.  Book bans and the like have been going on forever.  So have protests against them.  It's just that these arguments used to take place at school board meetings or other local meetings, whereas now everyone must shout about it on social media.  That's the only difference.

Yes,  that is what we are seeing;  select social media outage at local issues,   that typically have ZERO impact on the person's life (or those in their family circle).

Note that a local school district here in So Cal,   has come up with policy that,  so far,  is the best one I have heard:     teachers can not mandate specific fictional books as part of their class curriculum.     Instead they must offer sets of books that the student and their parents can select from.      At the PTA meeting most parents supported this policy;  the one group that were on-the-fence were parents associated with the LBGT community.      They voiced concerns that if other students weren't require to read LBGT related books,  that their child could still be viewed in a negative light or shunned from these other students.        

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1 hour ago, LsDoorMat said:

At first I thought you meant to read your comment while I can. Expecting controversial subject matter, I of course clicked. Yes, this is awful. If you don't LIKE a book, then don't READ the book!  And if the author of that article - or anybody - understands exactly what critical race theory is, I wish that they would explain it to me!

So schools should have Holocausts denial books in their library so those students that wish to read them can,  and those that don't,  can just ignore them?

Sorry,  but you're "then don't READ the book" does not address the actual issues of concern going on here.   

 

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Interestingly, I do not remember ever being told to read a specific book in 12 years of school or even college.  I was told that I had to read books of a certain length and then do a book report on them.  For example, in history classes they would be histories.

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2 minutes ago, ElCid said:

Interestingly, I do not remember ever being told to read a specific book in 12 years of school or even college.  I was told that I had to read books of a certain length and then do a book report on them.  For example, in history classes they would be histories.

We certainly did.  You were expected to have read a certain number of chapters by a deadline in order to participate in class discussion.   Some things were read as a group, such as Shakespeare's plays.

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2 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

We certainly did.  You were expected to have read a certain number of chapters by a deadline in order to participate in class discussion.   Some things were read as a group, such as Shakespeare's plays.

There were literature textbooks that contained classic literature, probably in abbreviated form.  Same for Shakespeare.  And then there were records of plays and so forth. 

Had one professor in college who would put on a record of a play and then go to his office across the hall for a while..😀  Sometimes a student would be assigned duty to turn the record over or put on the next one.  

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Just now, ElCid said:

There were literature textbooks that contained classic literature, probably in abbreviated form.  Same for Shakespeare.  And then there were records of plays and so forth. 

Had one professor in college who would put on a record of a play and then go to his office across the hall for a while..😀  Sometimes a student would be assigned duty to turn the record over or put on the next one.  

We had that as well, mostly with short-form literature and poetry,  but starting in 7th or 8th grade, the novels, Greek literature, and Shakespeare's works were in separate books.  

I had no literature textbooks or anthologies in college.    Consequently, I had to buy 5 books for my ENGL 1023 class and another 5 for HIST1013.

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8 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

We had that as well, mostly with short-form literature and poetry,  but starting in 7th or 8th grade, the novels, Greek literature, and Shakespeare's works were in separate books.  

I had no literature textbooks or anthologies in college.    Consequently, I had to buy 5 books for my ENGL 1023 class and another 5 for HIST1013.

In Jr high  and high school I had a very similar education. In high school I had to read Greek and Roman literature and one Shakespearean play. Those were  anthology books.

But in college, I had to buy the individual novels or plays, which were primarily American literature and Shakespeare. For one lower level required English class I had to read four or five Shakespearean plays.

I studied history in graduate school and I can remember reading books written by Henry Kissinger and others of that ilk.

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28 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

We certainly did.  You were expected to have read a certain number of chapters by a deadline in order to participate in class discussion.   Some things were read as a group, such as Shakespeare's plays.

This is also similar to my education. In high school we read novels like "Huckleberry Finn", "The Grapes of Wrath" and plays like "Death of a Salesman" as a group. So you had group participation and assigned reading.

In college you were on your own reading Faulkner or Hemingway.  You were expected to participate in group discussions, but the main grade was from writing essays and a midterm and a final, which were primarily essay.

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23 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

We had that as well, mostly with short-form literature and poetry,  but starting in 7th or 8th grade, the novels, Greek literature, and Shakespeare's works were in separate books.  

I had no literature textbooks or anthologies in college.    Consequently, I had to buy 5 books for my ENGL 1023 class and another 5 for HIST1013.

Here in CA starting in the 7th grade the teacher would assign a specific fictional book,  we were provided school-own copies of said-book and our homework was to read the book,  write an essay about the book and there would often also be a test about the book.      The type of books were as you noted:  E.g. Romeo and Juliet,  Great Expectations, etc...

Some of these were semester long projects:   I.e. the teacher would assign the book at the start of the semester and we had until a few weeks before the end of the semester to complete the essay.    The book would be included as part of the Final exam and often a major part of it.     

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1 minute ago, Princess of Tap said:

This is also similar to my education. In high school we read novels like "Huckleberry Finn", "The Grapes of Wrath" and plays like "Death of a Salesman" as a group. So you had group participation and assigned reading.

In college you were on your own reading Faulkner or Hemingway.  You were expected to participate in group discussions, but the main grade was from writing essays and a midterm and a final, which were primarily essay.

In HS, we only read plays as a group.  All other reading was on your own.

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In my schooling, we had both a list to choose from, and a few specific works we all had to read. Of the latter, we all had to read Of Mice And Men, and than as a class we read aloud Beowulf, and two Shakespeare plays. We did Romeo & Juliet and Julius Caesar. Most of my language arts classes were grammar intensive, and we didn't really delve into literature until my junior and senior years.

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1 hour ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

Here in CA starting in the 7th grade the teacher would assign a specific fictional book,  we were provided school-own copies of said-book and our homework was to read the book,  write an essay about the book and there would often also be a test about the book.      The type of books were as you noted:  E.g. Romeo and Juliet,  Great Expectations, etc...

Some of these were semester long projects:   I.e. the teacher would assign the book at the start of the semester and we had until a few weeks before the end of the semester to complete the essay.    The book would be included as part of the Final exam and often a major part of it.     

Had to remind me of that...HATED those essays. Fortunately didn't had to write one until the 10th grade.

At least its better than to remember "The Quality of Mercy in Merchant  of Venice."

 

Oh don't ask me what the essay was, dedicated to purge that damn thing from memory afterwards.

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50 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

In my schooling, we had both a list to choose from, and a few specific works we all had to read. Of the latter, we all had to read Of Mice And Men, and than as a class we read aloud Beowulf, and two Shakespeare plays. We did Romeo & Juliet and Julius Caesar. Most of my language arts classes were grammar intensive, and we didn't really delve into literature until my junior and senior years.

12th grade Literature book had a couple of Nathaniel Hawthorne works, Still remember laughing my self silly how many times one could go to hell in different ways in one of them (example..the string holding you up ready to cut)  Hawthorn should had included writing an essay - another method of sending one to hell. 

 

Oh did you say Beowulf,?

 

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