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Why is there such a Teacher shortage now ?


mr6666
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Some Schools Implementing Four-Day Weeks To Combat Teacher Shortage-

As students head back to school, a teacher shortage is causing some rural districts to shorten their weeks to only four days. The districts believe the four-day week will attract employees, competing with larger school systems that can afford to pay teachers more. However, some experts say the hours lost in the classroom can be detrimental to students over time.

 

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Here’s what’s driving the nationwide teacher shortage

The staffing crisis has permeated all levels of the profession, creating vacancies in nearly all capacities.
 
  • Burnout continues to be a driving force behind a nationwide teacher exodus that has left the industry with around a half a million fewer teachers.

  • But COVID-19 has only exacerbated a nationwide shortage that is decades in the making.

  • The current staffing crisis is compounded by a massive decline in undergraduate degrees in teacher education programs, low pay, expanded opportunities for women and lack of teaching degrees in STEM fields.

https://thehill.com/changing-america/enrichment/education/3276034-heres-whats-driving-the-nationwide-teacher-shortage/

 

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Tackling Teacher Shortages: What Can States and Districts Do?

"...........The reasons for teacher shortages are complex and predate the pandemic. Largely stagnant salaries over the past decade and a 19% weekly wage gap between teachers and other college-educated professionals, combined with a culture of teacher blame and punitive test-based evaluation, have taken a toll.

(In the most recent federal data examining teacher attrition, test-based accountability was the single largest reason given for leaving the profession.) Even before the onslaught of the pandemic in March 2020, current and prospective teachers were responding to widespread devaluing of the profession by choosing other careers. Perhaps not surprisingly, the pandemic has heightened the teacher shortage. As one teacher from Washington state recently put it, “Many of us are pouring from that empty cup from last year; we are emotionally exhausted.”

The question is: What can states and districts do to address the teacher shortage? And what actions can help them not only recruit and retain strong teachers today, but also support and strengthen the teacher workforce long term? Policymakers need to act quickly and strategically to address the mounting crisis..........

......One-third of those who left teaching reported working 56 hours or more per week, and one-third held second jobs while teaching. A full 64% of respondents said their pay wasn’t sufficient to merit the risk or stress.......

https://learningpolicyinstitute.org/blog/teacher-shortage-what-can-states-and-districts-do

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 10 Reasons Why There’s a K-12 Teacher Shortage

"......

Supply and Demand

1. More Students: The National Center for Education Statistics reports record-level increases in student enrollment every year since 2013, with this trend expected to continue until 2026.  

2. Student-to-teacher ratios: As educators know, the lower the student-to-teacher ratio, the better for students and teachers. As schools see funding gradually increase to pre-recession levels, many are looking to improve their ratios. Consider that some states are averaging as high as 24:1, much higher than the national 16:1 average.

3. Decline in teacher education enrollment: Just as student population levels have reached record highs, since 2011, teacher preparation programs have reported annual declines. While the steepest decline has been in alternative programs, traditional bachelor’s degrees in education have also decreased despite increases in bachelor’s degrees in all other substantial fields of study.

4. Decline in re-entrants: Teachers returning to the profession after temporary leave (maternity/health/personal leave) used to account for almost one-half of the year’s supply. However, a decline in re-entrants has hurt the availability of qualified educators.

Teachers Leaving the Profession

1. Stress: In a recent study, over 60 percent of educators and school staff indicated that they felt their work was “always” or “often” stressful. Factors included “stressful workload, the feeling of having to be ‘always on,’ the lack of resources, and the burden of ever-changing expectations.” A sometimes-overlooked contributor to teacher stress is the nationwide substitute teacher shortage. Without reliable substitute teacher coverage, full-time teachers may not be able to take the time off they need for illness, preparation, or professional development.

2. Lack of career preparation: Because of the incredible demand for teachers, some schools and districts have resorted to hiring college graduates without the proper certification or experience in the classroom that is usually required. The majority of teachers who participated in this Association of American Educators survey “felt they were not prepared for the realities of the classroom.” As the Washington Post reports, beginning teachers without adequate support are 2.5 times more likely to leave the classroom after just one year.

3. Lack of autonomy: In a Gallup poll, teachers ranked the lowest in feeling their opinions mattered in their profession. A professor in the education school at the University of Pennsylvania put it this way: “Teachers in schools do not call the shots. They have very little say.”

4. Inadequate compensationThough the cost of living has steadily increased, the average pay rate for teachers has actually decreased since 2000 — in some states by as much as 17 percent.

5. Lack of relevant professional developmentAt any given time, almost one-half of teachers are actively looking for a different job. Many teachers report that a lack of professional development and growth opportunities causes them to leave their positions. Even schools that have a reliable substitute teaching pool and budget for professional development may not take into account teachers’ individual growth and development needs. Ensuring teachers remain engaged is crucial to preventing burnout.

6. Overemphasis on test scoresIt is both a criticism and a goal to be known as a teacher who “teaches to the test.” On the one hand, it implies a sort of uninspired emphasis on benchmarks rather than on real learning; on the other hand, students and administrators feel pressure to perform on standardized tests and want to know the skills they’ll need. In an NEA study, 72 percent of teachers felt there was too much emphasis on test scores in their classrooms, leaving them little space for creativity and customization of learning.....

https://swingeducation.com/resources/10-reasons-why-k-12-teacher-shortage/

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Schools across the country are struggling to find staff.

Here’s why

"Paying students to serve lunches during school hours. Bringing retired teachers back to the classroom. Hiring bus drivers for janitorial duties. Shortening in-person instruction to four days a week.

Across the country, these are some of the short-term solutions to a nationwide shortage of school staff at all levels – teachers, administrators, food workers, custodial staff, bus drivers and more – school districts have put into place as they struggle with a combination of sick outages brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, a wave of teacher retirements, employee burnout and back-and-forths with unions.

The crisis will worsen as some states begin to head into colder temperatures and flu season, begins, administrators in Midwestern districts say. ........

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/education/schools-across-the-country-are-struggling-to-find-staff-heres-why

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  • mr6666 changed the title to Why is there such a Teacher shortage now ?
10 hours ago, mr6666 said:

Here’s what’s driving the nationwide teacher shortage

The staffing crisis has permeated all levels of the profession, creating vacancies in nearly all capacities.
 
  • Burnout continues to be a driving force behind a nationwide teacher exodus that has left the industry with around a half a million fewer teachers.

  • But COVID-19 has only exacerbated a nationwide shortage that is decades in the making.

  • The current staffing crisis is compounded by a massive decline in undergraduate degrees in teacher education programs, low pay, expanded opportunities for women and lack of teaching degrees in STEM fields.

https://thehill.com/changing-america/enrichment/education/3276034-heres-whats-driving-the-nationwide-teacher-shortage/

 

I think this says more than all the talk of CRT, LGBTQ, etc.  However, those factors certainly don't help.

There has always been a teacher shortage in America.  My wife and I met as teachers in 1971 - neither of us were certified or had completed required teacher education courses.  I had taken three as electives in college.  The state issued us warrants because we had four year degrees.  They were good for three years during which we were to complete the necessary teacher courses.  I did, but my wife didn't.  Ironically she taught longer than I did.  Of course neither of us had student teaching either.  The three years was to substitute for student teaching.  My two years in the military counted for two years of my student teaching, so that after completing one year of teaching and two education courses I became fully certified.  The two I had originally lacked were art history and health.  I was a history teacher.

I made more than my wife because of my two years of military "experience."   We both made less than new secretaries at International Paper Co. mill in same town.

On the other hand, most government employees in many occupations are underpaid.

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"According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, around 600000 teachers in public education quit between January 2020 and today......"

Are teachers quitting 2022?
 
 
survey last month found that about one-third of teachers and principals said they were likely to leave their current job by the end of the 2021-2022 school year. The survey follows an American Federation of Teachers' member poll that found that the this academic year was “one of the worst yea ...Jul 16, 2022
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How about paying them more? People don't want taxes raised to address the issue , want something for nothing!

According to the National Educational Association, Kentucky ranks 42nd in the nation for starting salaries, with new teachers averaging about $37,000 per year.

 

Teacher salaries rarely reflect the importance of their job. Why don’t we pay them enough

https://teachertaskforce.org/blog/teacher-salaries-rarely-reflect-importance-their-job-why-dont-we-pay-them-enough

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12 hours ago, mr6666 said:

"According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, around 600000 teachers in public education quit between January 2020 and today......"

Are teachers quitting 2022?
 
 
survey last month found that about one-third of teachers and principals said they were likely to leave their current job by the end of the 2021-2022 school year. The survey follows an American Federation of Teachers' member poll that found that the this academic year was “one of the worst yea ...Jul 16, 2022

Wonder how many are just deciding to retire rather than continuing to work but getting counted in the quitting category?  In S.C. a teacher can retire after 28 years.

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On 8/24/2022 at 6:30 PM, hamradio said:

Some people never notice the silly emoji.

Having fun with the English language - LIGHTEN UP!!

We don't need to lighten up,   instead you need to grow up.      That post is an insult to those born the way they were.

But if you're going to insult people with such traits at least be funny.     Your jokes just fall flat.     We might lighten up if they were funny.

 

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