Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Vivien Leigh


Arteesto
 Share

Recommended Posts

I only saw the opening moments of GONE WITH THE WIND last night, but I watched most of WATERLOO BRIDGE  (1940) again though I planned not to watch that heart-breaker.   I then watched at least an hour of THAT HAMILTON WOMAN (1941).  She is wonderful. 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/27/2022 at 4:38 AM, Arteesto said:

Found this breath taking photo of Vivien Leigh...

No actress could do her justice in a biographical movie..

Only Vivien Leigh could portray herself..and she's not available...

Here Comes Vivien! | Vivien Leigh & Laurence Olivier

Natalie Dormer is planning a biopic with herself as the star. But, really, it seems an impossible task.

Putting in my fave VL pic...

228660_1050208980362_2391_n (1).jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/27/2022 at 4:38 AM, Arteesto said:

Found this breath taking photo of Vivien Leigh...

No actress could do her justice in a biographical movie..

Only Vivien Leigh could portray herself..and she's not available...

Here Comes Vivien! | Vivien Leigh & Laurence Olivier

EXCEPT, for MAYBE Gal Gadot here...

Gal+Gadot+Wallpapers+34.jpg

(...yep, but she'd be the only one)

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of Vivien Leigh's day, I only watched THE ROMAN SPRING OF MRS. STONE.  (Have seen the other films many times.)   I'm morbidly fascinated by this one, such a depressing, chilling movie, the more so as I get older.   Her career slipping, husband dead, looks fading (though she is clearly still beautiful and impossibly chic, just not Jill St. John  shiny), new circle of grasping, opportunistic, motley "friends,"--I guess Mrs. Stone feels that Rome is the end of the line  for her, especially with Paolo's rejection after the home movies as he takes up with Jill St. John's character.  (I love how Mrs. Stone iced her earlier in the movie  by saying she'd seen none of her pictures.)

The first times I watched, the the young  scruffy man in the coat who watches and follows her seemed so scary.  But now I wonder--is he a third-rate Paolo, a would-be gigolo, or someone out to slit her throat and steal her jewels?  At the ending of movie as he walks slowly toward her with that small, almost-smile, it is terrifying.  Or is it?  This time after watching I bought the book to see if there was more to the story that didn't make the cut.  I'd like to picture Mrs. Stone and her new friend--maybe now sporting a vicuna coat--strolling down the Via Veneto arm in arm.  I guess that would be a revisionist ending.  But it's fun to imagine!  And I suspect probably not what Tennessee Williams had in mind.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, TheGayDivorcee1 said:

Of Vivien Leigh's day, I only watched THE ROMAN SPRING OF MRS. STONE.  (Have seen the other films many times.)   I'm morbidly fascinated by this one, such a depressing, chilling movie, the more so as I get older.   Her career slipping, husband dead, looks fading (though she is clearly still beautiful and impossibly chic, just not Jill St. John  shiny), new circle of grasping, opportunistic, motley "friends,"--I guess Mrs. Stone feels that Rome is the end of the line  for her, especially with Paolo's rejection after the home movies as he takes up with Jill St. John's character.  (I love how Mrs. Stone iced her earlier in the movie  by saying she'd seen none of her pictures.)

The first times I watched, the the young  scruffy man in the coat who watches and follows her seemed so scary.  But now I wonder--is he a third-rate Paolo, a would-be gigolo, or someone out to slit her throat and steal her jewels?  At the ending of movie as he walks slowly toward her with that small, almost-smile, it is terrifying.  Or is it?  This time after watching I bought the book to see if there was more to the story that didn't make the cut.  I'd like to picture Mrs. Stone and her new friend--maybe now sporting a vicuna coat--strolling down the Via Veneto arm in arm.  I guess that would be a revisionist ending.  But it's fun to imagine!  And I suspect probably not what Tennessee Williams had in mind.

Let us know how the book differs or if it does. I think Viv won the NY Critics award for it, but didn't get an Oscar nomination. Depressing movie and it had to be depressing acting in it with many similarities to her own age and career. I just finished a book about her and Olivier (Truly, Madly) which went into great detail about her manic/depressive episodes. So terrible. It's amazing she lived as long as she did or had the career she did.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think that Leigh's performance as Scarlett is, arguably, the most enduring performance of any actress in a 1930s film, a huge statement, I know, but try to name another film of that decade as big (well, there was none, of course) that depended for its success so much upon its lead character.

At the same time she was sensitive and touching in Waterloo Bridge and, arguably, never looked more beautifully photographed than in That Hamilton Woman.

But she had a spotty film career after these early Hollywood triumphs, eventually going on, of course, to play the second most famous southern belle after Scarlet in A Streetcar Named Desire. Brando's performance in that film continues to be the most hailed, I suspect, but Vivien's mentally fragile, deteriorating characterization matches his. Unfortunately that mental fragility was also reflective of the actress herself.

I have thought, too, of Peter Finch, supposedly a friend of Laurence Olivier. Some friend, romancing his wife while making Elephant Walk with her. In that respect he can compare to Sinatra, friend of Bogart, romancing Bacall while Bogie was on his death bed.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I watched That Hamilton Woman this time around. She is so good in it and so beautiful. I hadn't seen it in a long time. I didn't see the 70's version with Finch and Glenda Jackson, though I wanted to.  Would be interesting to compare them. You can thank Olivier for Vivien's spotty film career (after GWTW). He wanted them to concentrate on the stage, which she did. Later as her illness got worse, that probably factored in too. (film work). Having to be replaced on Elephant Walk am sure made Hollywood reluctant to cast/finance a film with her in it. There's a big gap in the 50s in her film career.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Vivien Leigh is one of my most admired actresses.  I love her in "Waterloo Bridge" but her performance as Blanche DuBois in "A Streetcar Named Desire" is one of the rare memorable performances that I will never forget.  As her character, she conveys pity and terror.  Blanche has worked out a careful network of illusions that come crashing down when the animalistic Stanley (played by Marlon Brando) attacks her.  Her desperation and instability are very authentically portrayed.

image.jpeg.fa80654d2e5e4017fe5ad28d2b6996e7.jpeg   image.jpeg.33592fa2df103a791ad6e95bc7fa9bed.jpeg    7 Blanche Dubois ideas | streetcar named desire, vivien leigh, dubois

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, TomJH said:

I think that Leigh's performance as Scarlett is, arguably, the most enduring performance of any actress in a 1930s film, a huge statement, I know, but try to name another film of that decade as big (well, there was none, of course) that depended for its success so much upon its lead character.

 

I'd say THE WIZARD OF OZ depended a lot on the lead character of Dorothy to be sufficiently sympathetic for it's success.  And JUDY GARLAND did Dorothy more justice than anyone else probably could have.  Yes, even Shirley Temple.

But this isn't meant to  dilute the belief of Vivian Leigh's talent and skills as an actress.  And really, as much as I liked her GWTW performance, I was more dazzled by her Blanche DuBois  than her Scarlett.  

Sepiatone

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0047978/mediaviewer/rm1227319040/?ref_=tt_ov_i

 

One film I'd like to see (and there's little chance) is the 50s British film The Deep Blue Sea a film adaption of a Terrence Rattigan play.. The film is considered "lost" and the BFI owns the only known copy. How could this happen? This was the only film Leigh made after Streetcar in the 50s.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Driving back from the Academy Awards after Vivien won for Best Actress in GWTW, Olivier grabbed her Oscar out of  jealousy because he lost for Best Actor to Robert Donat's performance in Goodbye Mr. Chips.  Laurence was nominated for Wuthering Heights.  Olivier admitted that grabbing Vivien's Oscar was a way of restraining himself from hitting her.  How mature it would have been to be happy for Vivien.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, cinemaspeak59 said:

Driving back from the Academy Awards after Vivien won for Best Actress in GWTW, Olivier grabbed her Oscar out of  jealousy because he lost for Best Actor to Robert Donat's performance in Goodbye Mr. Chips.  Laurence was nominated for Wuthering Heights.  Olivier admitted that grabbing Vivien's Oscar was a way of restraining himself from hitting her.  How mature it would have been to be happy for Vivien.

Sad. :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Hibi said:

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0047978/mediaviewer/rm1227319040/?ref_=tt_ov_i

 

One film I'd like to see (and there's little chance) is the 50s British film The Deep Blue Sea a film adaption of a Terrence Rattigan play.. The film is considered "lost" and the BFI owns the only known copy. How could this happen? This was the only film Leigh made after Streetcar in the 50s.

You usually can't go wrong with a movie from a Rattigan play.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, cinemaspeak59 said:

Driving back from the Academy Awards after Vivien won for Best Actress in GWTW, Olivier grabbed her Oscar out of  jealousy because he lost for Best Actor to Robert Donat's performance in Goodbye Mr. Chips.  Laurence was nominated for Wuthering Heights.  Olivier admitted that grabbing Vivien's Oscar was a way of restraining himself from hitting her.  How mature it would have been to be happy for Vivien.

The couple relationship was very strained by Leigh's mental illness,she was promiscuous and hard to control,Olivier was relieved Peter Finch had an affair with her,he was relieved it was Finch than any other bum, Warren Beatty also had an affair with her during the Roman Spring of Mrs Stone filn,I think he should  had passed on the offer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Fading Fast said:

You usually can't go wrong with a movie from a Rattigan play.  

He even wrote the screenplay. Odd the film is forgotten and lost!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, nakano said:

The couple relationship was very strained by Leigh's mental illness,she was promiscuous and hard to control,Olivier was relieved Peter Finch had an affair with her,he was relieved it was Finch than any other bum, Warren Beatty also had an affair with her during the Roman Spring of Mrs Stone filn,I think he should  had passed on the offer

Yes, but that wasn't the case during the Oscar incident. Her sexual drive was in overdrive during her manic periods. She'd go days without sleeping; partying; drinking; hysterical outbursts etc...

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, nakano said:

Warren Beatty also had an affair with her during the Roman Spring of Mrs Stone

I cannot stand WARREN BEATTY in that part.  A tawdry subject with last gasp Hollywood baloney, how much better might it have been with a young Italian actor playing the part... RENATO SALVATORE...?  SERGE REGGIANI...?   ALAIN DELON playing Italian (which he's done) would've been better.  The gossip to me is merely that. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/30/2022 at 9:51 AM, Hibi said:

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0047978/mediaviewer/rm1227319040/?ref_=tt_ov_i

 

One film I'd like to see (and there's little chance) is the 50s British film The Deep Blue Sea a film adaption of a Terrence Rattigan play.. The film is considered "lost" and the BFI owns the only known copy. How could this happen? This was the only film Leigh made after Streetcar in the 50s.

This isn't the best copy, but the film appears to have no copyright holder. The copy the BFI cobbled together restored it to some degree, but I'm not sure they had a negative to work with.

This may be Leigh's least-effective film post GWTW.

She was never quite as effectively used in British films for me as she was in her US films.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Leighcat said:

This may be Leigh's least-effective film post GWTW.

She was never quite as effectively used in British films for me as she was in her US films.

I dunno about that here, Leighcat. Ya see, after watching this copy of the film you've just graced us with here, I have to say I thought Vivien gave a very good performance in it, and in fact would even go so far as to say that she might've been better cast in this FILM (operative word here) version of this story than if the originator of this character on stage, Peggy Ashcroft, would've been.

And I say this because of the idea that I got the idea that the Hester character was supposed to be so attractive in appearance that the Freddie character just couldn't resist pursuing her affections. And so with the idea of the medium of film containing close-ups of the actors' faces, and something the audience in stage productions never see, AND with the idea that even as great an actress as Peggy Ashcroft was, I've never thought of her being any sort of "stunning beauty" and as was Vivien Leigh(and yes even by the time of this film's production), and so I think this aspects alone adds to the credibility of this film.

(...whoa...how was THAT for one long run-on sentence there, HUH?!)  ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...