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Katharine Hepburn - my hero!


Toto
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Recently, I enjoyed watching "The African Queen" (1951) starring Katharine Hepburn as Rose and Humphrey Bogart as Charlie.  I had seen this film as a kid and felt that Katharine Hepburn played Rose as a courageous, intelligent, caring character that I admired - in fact felt like a hero to me.  Rose shows strength as she works alongside Charlie on the rickety boat and never panics.  It is her that initiates the heroic plan to sink the German ship against all odds.  She also helps Charlie think up a way of building torpedoes and suggests welding the ship's rudder when it breaks.  I love when she breaks down her prim and proper missionary exterior and gives her heart to Charlie.

As in many of her roles, Katharine Hepburn shows intelligence and maturity.  I also love her in "Holiday" (1938) where she played Linda alongside Cary Grant.  Linda was defiantly not interested in the social niceties and rigid manners of her family.  Another favorite Hepburn film is Stage Door (1937).  Hepburn's character ultimately wins the respect of fellow actresses when she moves to New York to break into Broadway.  Then there's the amazing films with Spencer Tracy.  Hepburn plays characters that can go head-to-head with the Tracy characters.  As a child, I felt Hepburn's characters portrayed great possibilities for a woman as having intelligence, strength and heart.

How about your classic film heroes? 

Hepburn and Humphrey Bogart in The African Queen 

   Spencer Tracy and Hepburn in Woman of the Year

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24 minutes ago, Toto said:

How about your classic film heroes? 

The first person to pop into my head in answer to this question of yours here Toto, would be:

James-Stewart-1.jpg&ehk=ABrrCUoycWxrT1ne

I've always admired this man not only for being a great "naturalistic" actor, but also for every aspect of the man including his life led off-camera as well.

(...he's what I've always felt would personify as the best example of what the American male should hope to be)

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Barbara Stanwyck  is my hero in film after film.  Stella Dallas is my favorite.  She plays a lower class girl who sets her cap for the factory manager, an upper-class guy who thinks he will change her, but fails when up against a stronger personality.  She ultimately sacrifices her own role as active mother so the daughter she loves more than anything in the world can go live with her father and step-mother and marry the upper-class boy she wants.   Whether she's controlling  the men in film noir like "Double Indemnity," and "The Strange love of Martha Ivers,"  using men to get to the top in "Baby Face," or falling in love with them in "Remember the Night,"  she never  loses herself.

Barbara Stanwyck - Rotten Tomatoes

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"Hero" in these cases is difficult to  asignate.

It could mean, as Dargo mentioned, a "classic" film "hero" could be so based on the type of off-camera life he led.  OR could mean the type of person he/she usually portrayed in movies.

In the former case, I'd go with darg's choice of Jimmy Stewart.  And too,  Jimmy's best friend HENRY FONDA fits the latter case.  And SPENCER TRACY fits somewhere in between. 

And that's in total disregard for their personal politics.

But a third case, that of movie "hero" being defines as one who usually played a hero in movies then I'm sure many, in that instance, woup pick either JOHN WAYNE or RANDOLPH SCOTT. 

So define, Tot, what you mean by "classic" movie hero and our choices might be easier to make.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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Edit: never mind. I realize I just posted actors I like, rather than the OP's request for "your heroes".

I honestly don't believe I've ever had any "heroes" as it's commonly defined, and certainly not among actors.

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1 hour ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

My choice is Leslie Howard:

Great choice, he not only played heroes he actually was a war hero in real life.

His Ashley Wilkes in "Gone with the Wind," is my idea of the perfect man.  Good morals, loyal to his wife even with Vivian Leigh "waitin' for him like a spider,"  Intelligent,  gentlemanly, and quietly brave without the bravado.

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41 minutes ago, AndreaDoria said:

Great choice, he not only played heroes he actually was a war hero in real life.

His Ashley Wilkes in "Gone with the Wind," is my idea of the perfect man.  Good morals, loyal to his wife even with Vivian Leigh "waitin' for him like a spider,"  Intelligent,  gentlemanly, and quietly brave without the bravado.

You clearly understand why I selected Leslie Howard.   Most people don't.      Sad that he died during WWII while serving his country,  but at least we have all the great movies he was in.  Thus he will never be forgotten.

 

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Edit: never mind. I realize I just posted actors I like, rather than the OP's request for "your heroes".

I honestly don't believe I've ever had any "heroes" as it's commonly defined, and certainly not among actors.

Now Lawrence, don't forget that there a bit of a difference here in regard to viewing someone as being a "hero" of sorts to you, AND with that of the idea of "hero worshiping". And as if your "hero" would be someone whose you-know-what would never give off any trace of a foul odor, so to speak.

You know, like say a certain someone around here who'll occasionally press the idea how he feels about John Wayne?  ;)

And so surely there's GOT to be at least one or two actors you could point to and say you feel as being a "hero" or at least holding some messure of admiration of yours, BUT who you still would  never "worship", isn't there?

(...I mean, even I know Jimmy Stewart's you-know-what would've probaby stank as much as anyone elses, ya know!)

LOL

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5 hours ago, Dargo said:

The first person to pop into my head in answer to this question of yours here Toto, would be:

James-Stewart-1.jpg&ehk=ABrrCUoycWxrT1ne

I've always admired this man not only for being a great "naturalistic" actor, but also for every aspect of the man including his life led off-camera as well.

(...he's what I've always felt would personify as the best example of what the American male should hope to be)

Jimmy Stewart is a great choice for onscreen heroes.  He often played characters with integrity such as in "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington", "It's a Wonderful Life" and "You Can't Take it With You".  He also played characters struggling to do the right thing such as in "Rear Window".  Not to mention - Stewart is a brilliant actor.

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2 hours ago, Dargo said:

And as if your "hero" would be someone whose you-know-what would never give off any trace of a fowl odor, so to speak.

I'm just guessing, but I think someone's "you-know-what" would smell fowl after someone consumed fowl.

I suspect that you meant "foul," as in foul balls.

On that note, poultry genitalia is a fascinating subject. See the groundbreaking scientific study and recipe by Harland Sanders in Farm Animal Report, May 1944.

Copy-of-Do-Chickens-Have-Balls-Rooster-M

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Just now, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

I'm just guessing, but I think someone's "you-know-what" would smell fowl after someone consumed fowl.

I suspect that you meant "foul," as in foul balls.

On that note, poultry genitalia is fascinating subject. See the groundbreaking scientific study and recipe by Harland Sanders in Farm Animal Report, May 1944.

Copy-of-Do-Chickens-Have-Balls-Rooster-M

LOL

Thanks for the correction here, EPM.

Believe it or not, I did know better than this.

(...and will now go back up there and corrrect it)

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

"Hero" in these cases is difficult to  asignate.

It could mean, as Dargo mentioned, a "classic" film "hero" could be so based on the type of off-camera life he led.  OR could mean the type of person he/she usually portrayed in movies.

In the former case, I'd go with darg's choice of Jimmy Stewart.  And too,  Jimmy's best friend HENRY FONDA fits the latter case.  And SPENCER TRACY fits somewhere in between. 

And that's in total disregard for their personal politics.

But a third case, that of movie "hero" being defines as one who usually played a hero in movies then I'm sure many, in that instance, woup pick either JOHN WAYNE or RANDOLPH SCOTT. 

So define, Tot, what you mean by "classic" movie hero and our choices might be easier to make.  ;) 

Sepiatone

Great question!  I was thinking with my post the type of person he/she usually portrayed in movies.  Henry Fonda is a great choice especially in roles like "Mister Roberts", "The Grapes of Wrath" and "12 Angry Men".  For me, Henry Fonda became Tom Joad in "The Grapes of Wrath" and it gives me chills when he delivers these lines:

“I'll be all around in the dark. I'll be everywhere - wherever you can look. Wherever there's a fight so hungry people can eat, I'll be there. Wherever there's a copbeating up a guy, I'll be there.”

talking to Ma about leaving to help people in need

However, if people feel inspired to mention how an actor or actress is a hero (or not a hero) off the screen that's okay too.

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck....Is tom Joad a hero? - WriteWork

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2 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

I'm just guessing, but I think someone's "you-know-what" would smell fowl after someone consumed fowl.

I suspect that you meant "foul," as in foul balls.

If I had seen Dargo's post, I would have tried to find the Youtube version of this:

astrait3.jpg

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2 minutes ago, Fedya said:

If I had seen Dargo's post, I would have tried to find the Youtube version of this:

. . . which begs the question: W-h-y is Leo Krause (George Kennedy) about to decapitate a rooster?

I wasn't aware that people ate roosters. Sadly, they do (people will eat anything!).

astrait3.jpg

Rooster: "Where's Rooster Cogburn when I need him?"

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Btw hereToto, and regarding the following...

2 hours ago, Toto said:

For me, Henry Fonda became Tom Joad in "The Grapes of Wrath" and it gives me chills when he delivers these lines:

“I'll be all around in the dark. I'll be everywhere - wherever you can look. Wherever there's a fight so hungry people can eat, I'll be there. Wherever there's a copbeating up a guy, I'll be there.”

You should hear my Henry Fonda impression, and one I always do while reciting those very lines.

(...and I hate to brag here, mind you, but I never run afowl..ahem..I mean, run afoul while I'm doing it)

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23 minutes ago, Mr. Gorman said:

@JAMES AND THY JAZZY GUITAR: 

Leslie Howard isn't dead.  He was reincarnated as golfer LUKE DONALD!   I swear! 

Well, ya know, Mr.G. The LEAST you could've done here was to now show us a pic of this golfer you claim is Leslie Howard's doppelganger!

Alright. I'll do it for ya here...

dee8996fea65272b00866b5fa8e26ef6

Yeah, I suppose there's some resemblance here.

(...but I'd say not NEARLY as much as an older Johnny Weissmuller looks like you-know-WHO, anyway!) 

LOL

 

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One of my favorite Katharine Hepburn performances is her portrayal of Alice Adams.

James Stewart has always been one of my "all-timers," with L.B. "Jeff" Jefferies in Rear Window at the top of my list.

Both Barbara Stanwyck as Jean Harrington and Henry Fonda as Charles Pike shine in the Preston Sturges screwball comedy The Lady Eve.

Leslie Howard  is superb as the club-footed Philip Carey who enrolls in medical school in 1934's Of Human Bondage.

 

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25 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

I think I saw the "Six Million Dollar Man" in this movie. Does anybody else remember seeing him?

Yep, Princess. Lee Majors has an uncredited role in Strait-Jacket...

strait15.jpg&ehk=1dNJTgJhZhVFcu7CvNlV8Az

63strait16july3.jpg

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Errol Flynn was known as a movie hero, of course, but, having being raised on his swashbucklers as a boy on television, he still remains my favourite actor, certainly during his prime years before his self destructive lifestyle lead him to a career decline and early death.

Aside from being devilishly handsome and having screen charisma and charm to spare, Flynn's easy going, understated acting style doesn't date. His film heroes still seem credible to me, part of the reason for that being that Errol always made it seem so natural and easy on screen (undoubtedly a reason for his acting to be dismissed during his lifetime as he persuasively played larger than life heroics on screen).

There were even subtle differences in his four big screen swashbuckling portrayals. In Captain Blood he is bitter and out for revenge; in Robin Hood, while seeking justice, he is a laughing rogue defiant of authority; as Jeffrey Thorpe in The Sea Hawk Flynn is understated as a courtly gentleman; finally, as Don Juan, he brings a cynicism and world weariness to his characterization.

Flynn is still regarded as the screen's greatest swashbuckler by most, I suppose, but I think it goes beyond that. In the history of films I can't think of another actor who was credible as an action hero in costume dramas, westerns and war dramas. That makes Errol Flynn a pretty unique performer in my estimation. Many actors may have mastered two of those film genres but who else, aside from Flynn, could do all three?

Having said that, my favourite Flynn performance is not in any of those action films but, instead, in Gentleman Jim, where his high energy performance and charm, combined with an opportunity to show his flair for humour, makes boxer Jim Corbett, a strutting turn of the century c ock of the walk a winning protagonist one can root for.

Gentleman Jim (1942) -- (Movie Clip) This Is A Break For Me - Turner  Classic Movies

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