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Alan Ladd.


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  Couple days late unfortunately.  This Guy Deserves All the attention in the world, whenever possible in my opinion.

  As of September 3rd, Happy One-Hundred and Ninth Birthday to this awesome charismatic immersive Fellow.  Born September 3rd 1913. Hot Springs Arkansas. Passed away January 29th. Palm Springs California.

 Personally have Never seen a performance of his I did Not Like. Personal favourite is This Gun For Hire; with Shane being a (Very) close second.

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I also love the movie "Shane" (1953), directed by George Stevens and starring Alan Ladd in the title role and Jean Arthur.  On the surface, this is a western about farmers standing up to the rule of the gun in the old west but the story is more complex than just this.  Ladd plays Shane, a lone rider who helps a farmer's family stand up to hired thugs and keep their land but in addition, there is an attraction between Shane and the farmer's wife (played by Jean Arthur) and Shane is touched by the affection and admiration of the farmer's son Joey.  Shane has a past as a hired gunman but wants to leave his past behind when he moves in with the farmer's family.  Joey sees Shane absorb insults and punishment from thugs in a saloon who want the farmer's to tear down their fences and let their cattle roam free.  Shane knows if he defends the farmer's family, he'll have to leave the valley.   Shane finally has to act to defend the family. 

"There's no living with a killing," Shane tells Joey, after shooting three men dead in the saloon. "There's no going back from it. Right or wrong, it's a brand, a brand that sticks."

Alan Ladd does a wonderful job playing Shane.  He has a slighter build but a quiet strength.

Shane - Variety

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I liked Shane too. I assume you are aware of the controversy over whether or not he dies in the end. Many say he rode off into the sunset. Others say he slumped over dead in the saddle. I like to believe he survived.  Either way the movie is a classic.

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The ambiguity of Shane's final scene adds to the film's legendary status.

The gunfighter's arm hangs stiffly by his side as he rides into the mountains (after neglecting to get any medical attention for a wound received in a gunfight).

Whether or not Shane dies as a result of that wound he is a man living beyond his time. And he knows it.

How Shane captured the shifting mood of postwar America - Little White Lies

Alan Ladd may have been a limited actor but he brings a haunting quality to the role of an outsider who tries, but fails, to become a part of a family unit. The actor always had an aura of sadness about him, that sadness playing a key role in his effectiveness in the title role.

Another Ladd western well worth viewing: The Proud Rebel, directed by Michael Curtiz, in which he plays an ex reb in post Civil War America searching for a doctor to help his mute son. It's a character driven western, with memorable contributions from Olivia de Havilland as a farm woman and, in a film stealing performance, Ladd's real life son David (who later became a film producer and is still with us today at 75) as his boy.

The Proud Rebel (1958) - Once Upon a Time in a Western

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ARI, you failed to mention that Ladd passed away on Jan. 29, 1964!  As you wrote it some might get the idea he just died this past January.  ;) 

I really don't have a Ladd favorite as for me to do that would  be difficult.  I always liked Ladd in a variety of movies and the legends surrounding them.  Like having the diminutive Ladd either standing on an unseen riser or costars standing in unseen ditches in order to have him at eye level or taller than leading ladies or other co stars.   And he certainly did seem to come a long way from CITIZEN KANE, didn't he?  ;) 

Sepiatone

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32 minutes ago, TomJH said:

The ambiguity of Shane's final scene adds to the film's legendary status.

The gunfighter's arm hangs stiffly by his side as he rides into the mountains (after neglecting to get any medical attention for a wound received in a gunfight).

Whether or not Shane dies as a result of that wound he is a man living beyond his time. And he knows it.

Yeah, but ya know MY favorite part in Shane are all those times Alan Ladd does that whole gun twirling thing as he places that trusty ol' six-shooter o' his back into his holster.

Yep, I think that sort'a thing he does there just adds that little extra bit of pizzazz to his character.

(...doncha agree, Tom?!) ;)

LOL

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14 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Yeah, but ya know MY favorite part in Shane are all those times Alan Ladd does that whole gun twirling thing as he places that trusty ol' six-shooter o' his back into his holster.

Yep, I think that sort'a thing he does there just adds that little extra bit of pizzazz to his character.

(...doncha agree, Tom?!) ;)

LOL

Ya got quite the memory, doncha, Dargo?

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

ARI, you failed to mention that Ladd passed away on Jan. 29, 1964!  As you wrote it some might get the idea he just died this past January.  ;) 

I really don't have a Ladd favorite as for me to do that would  be difficult.  I always liked Ladd in a variety of movies and the legends surrounding them.  Like having the diminutive Ladd either standing on an unseen riser or costars standing in unseen ditches in order to have him at eye level or taller than leading ladies or other co stars.   And he certainly did seem to come a long way from CITIZEN KANE, didn't he?  ;) 

Sepiatone

I was really interested and looked up Ladd's role in Citizen Kane.  He had a small role as a pipe-smoking reporter.  I have to look for him next time I watch Citizen Kane.  I haven't seen "This Gun for Hire".  I'll check it out.

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ARITOSTHENES,  couldn't agree more with your assessment of the wonderful Alan Ladd.   You said exactly what I was thinking--  have never seen a performance of his I did not like.    He's a complex presence on screen, with quiet magnetism.

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In 1965 I was stationed on a ship that visited Kaohsiung (Formosa) for a few weeks. One day my "girlfriend" wanted me to take her to a movie.  Yea, Alan was in it.  I did not understand a word. my Chinese being a little, uh, rusty.. All i remember is that Ladd was fighting on the top of a snowy mountain.  Any Ladd-ites out there know it?

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2 hours ago, laffite said:

Any Ladd-ites out there?

Yeah, I'm one of those people who think advancing technology will prove to be the bane of the working man. So what OF it, laffite?!!!

(...sorry...jus' couldn't resist this one)  ;)

2 hours ago, laffite said:

All i remember is that Ladd was fighting on the top of a snowy mountain.

Looking at Ladd's filmography, I'm thinking it was probably 1960's All the Young Men...a Korean War movie that he co-starred in with Sidney Poitier...

MV5BNzkxNDcxOTYzN15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNDI1

 

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Alan Ladd was somewhat limited as an actor.   I few him more as a movie star than an actor due to his screen persona that is both charming with a hint of danger.

My favorite 10 films of his in chronological order are:

This Gun For Hire,     The Glass Key,  and Lucky Jordan (all 1942),   Salty O'Rourke (1945),  Two Years Before the Mast,   The Blue Dahila (both 1946),   Chicago Deadline (1949),  Appointment with Danger (1951),  Shane (1953),   and The Proud Rebel (1958).

       

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On 9/5/2022 at 11:10 AM, Sepiatone said:

ARI, you failed to mention that Ladd passed away on Jan. 29, 1964!  As you wrote it some might get the idea he just died this past January.  ;) 

I really don't have a Ladd favorite as for me to do that would  be difficult.  I always liked Ladd in a variety of movies and the legends surrounding them.  Like having the diminutive Ladd either standing on an unseen riser or costars standing in unseen ditches in order to have him at eye level or taller than leading ladies or other co stars.   And he certainly did seem to come a long way from CITIZEN KANE, didn't he?  ;) 

Sepiatone

Yes Indeed.

    Mny Thanks for that Audible, Seeps.

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On 9/5/2022 at 12:24 PM, lilypond said:

ARITOSTHENES,  couldn't agree more with your assessment of the wonderful Alan Ladd.   You said exactly what I was thinking--  have never seen a performance of his I did not like.    He's a complex presence on screen, with quiet magnetism.

That is a Absolutely Sweet Heart Comment Lily. (Along with a Grateful Doff of the cap for Seeps) Thank You

  There are Very, Very Very Few Performers and Artists Indeed, Past or Present; where I actually LIKED (Not Just Tolererated, but Enjoyed and Admired) Each and Every of their Performances (to the best of my memory).  I would also definitively Include Yvonne De Carlo, Maureen O'Hara, Elisha Cook Jr., Vincent Price, and Dorothy MaGuire within the parameters of this observation.

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3 hours ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

Alan Ladd was somewhat limited as an actor.   I few him more as a movie star than an actor due to his screen persona that is both charming with a hint of danger.

My favorite 10 films of his in chronological order are:

This Gun For Hire,     The Glass Key,  and Lucky Jordan (all 1942),   Salty O'Rourke (1945),  Two Years Before the Mast,   The Blue Dahila (both 1946),   Chicago Deadline (1949),  Appointment with Danger (1951),  Shane (1953),   and The Proud Rebel (1958).

       

This Gun For Hire is most likely a gumshoe-in for top ten of Best Crime Thrillers for me

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On 9/5/2022 at 9:52 AM, Hoganman1 said:

I liked Shane too. I assume you are aware of the controversy over whether or not he dies in the end. Many say he rode off into the sunset. Others say he slumped over dead in the saddle. I like to believe he survived.  Either way the movie is a classic.

Yes Indeed. Thank You, Very Much. 

  I LOVE Films where such a "choose your ending" card is presented on the table.  Those (films) that do this, to varying degrees of magnification and specification; often end up being VERY Very Special Indeed.

   Offhand; the more recent likes of Memento, Sucker Punch, the Brothers Bloom, the Batman, the Whistlers, Powder Blue, Perfect Sense, and 3,000 Years of Longing are (subjectively) rather Fantastic - Stellar - Exquisite further and additional examples of this.

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On 9/5/2022 at 10:54 AM, TomJH said:

The ambiguity of Shane's final scene adds to the film's legendary status.

The gunfighter's arm hangs stiffly by his side as he rides into the mountains (after neglecting to get any medical attention for a wound received in a gunfight).

Whether or not Shane dies as a result of that wound he is a man living beyond his time. And he knows it.

How Shane captured the shifting mood of postwar America - Little White Lies

Alan Ladd may have been a limited actor but he brings a haunting quality to the role of an outsider who tries, but fails, to become a part of a family unit. The actor always had an aura of sadness about him, that sadness playing a key role in his effectiveness in the title role.

Another Ladd western well worth viewing: The Proud Rebel, directed by Michael Curtiz, in which he plays an ex reb in post Civil War America searching for a doctor to help his mute son. It's a character driven western, with memorable contributions from Olivia de Havilland as a farm woman and, in a film stealing performance, Ladd's real life son David (who later became a film producer and is still with us today at 75) as his boy.

The Proud Rebel (1958) - Once Upon a Time in a Western

Yes Indeed. Thank You, Very Much Tom. I mentioned as much to Hogan Man but also wanted to make mention as well directly to Yourself If there be an Interest.

  I LOVE Films where such a "choose your ending" card is presented on the table.  Those (films) that do this, to varying degrees of magnification and specification; often end up being VERY Very Special Indeed.

   Offhand; the more recent likes of Memento, Sucker Punch, the Brothers Bloom, the Batman, the Whistlers, Powder Blue, Perfect Sense, and 3,000 Years of Longing are (subjectively) rather Fantastic - Stellar - Exquisite further and additiinal examples of this.

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