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Those Television Thrills Of Yesteryear


TomJH
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8 minutes ago, miltk said:

https://archive.org/details/PDTV0261/The+Untouchables+-+001+-+The+Empty+Chair+-+1959-10-15.mp4

 

not all i think but if i like the taste i might get the whole kaboodle

 

And just think here, milt?!

By watchin' it HERE, you then don't have to worry about that secretary you're havin' a fling with becoming concerned that she'll miss watching Bob Stack on this series, IF at the last minute C.C. Baxter tries to change the night to use his apartment for this sort'a thing to a Tuesday!

(...oh the advantages of modern conveniences, eh?!)  ;)

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12 hours ago, TomJH said:

As a boy watching early television in the fifties I can still recall the excitement I felt over various adventure or western TV series. There may be a few that I saw in syndication after their original broadcast as I eagerly looked forward to each episode

It seems to me that it was always on Saturday mornings that I faithfully tuned into two favourites, The Cisco Kid, with Duncan Renaldo and Leo Carillo ("Oh, Cisco! Oh Pancho!"), as well as Wild Bill Hickok, with a clean cut Guy Madison who looked nothing like the real Hickok, of course, along with Andy Devine as his bulbous sidekick, Jingles. These two shows both fell into the category of kiddie fare. Perhaps a few adults watched them, as well, but only, I rather suspect, because they were flickering on their living room boob tube.

I definitely got into the merchandising in those days, proudly possessing a Wild Bill Hickok lunchbox and thermos when I went to school. In fact I still have that lunchbox today but it's pretty scratched up, now containing an assortment of nails and screws. The thermos disappeared long ago to wherever TV series inspired thermoses go.

Horses That Old Western Stars of B-Films and Their Sidekicks Rode -  ReelRundownSold Price: Clean Wild Bill Hickok Tin Lunch Box - July 3, 0119 10:00 AM EDT

Years later my parents look me to the circus when it came to Toronto's Maple Leaf Gardens, the highlight of which, for me, was when the Cisco Kid rode around the ring on his faithful horse Diablo (similar to those seeing Hopalong Cassidy do the same thing in De Mille's Greatest Show On Earth). I recall getting in a long excited lineup of kids with my Dad to meet Duncan Renaldo, who was handing out Cisco Kid photographs of himself. My Dad, who had been born and raised in Mexico, spoke Spanish to Renaldo for about twenty seconds or so, one of the few exchanges of that kind, I'm sure, that the actor had that day. (There wasn't exactly a lot of Spanish spoken in late 50s, early 60s Toronto).

The Cisco Kid (TV series) - Wikipedia

It wasn't just the western frontier that seized my television viewing childhood imagination, though. There were also those wild jungles of Africa (as seen through cardboard studio backdrops) in Ramar of the Jungle, featuring Jon Hall. For a while the series changed location to India but it was still the same studio stuff done on the cheap (which my little eyes always failed to notice). I recall my parents buying me a Ramar of the Jungle marble game. It was a circular plastic half bowl through which you had to use your manual dexterity to have a marble travel without getting stuck in a trap. Along the way of the jungle trail, of course, there were colourful painted depictions of crocodiles, lions, elephants ready to stampede, etc.

Ramar of the Jungle, The New Jungle Game | Board Game | BoardGameGeek

Disney drew my adolescent attention, of course, with two of my TV favourites, one of them Davy Crockett (a five part miniseries on Disneyland, my favourite when Davy had to take on Mike Fink and the river pirates). For obvious reasons I didn't much like it when Davy went to the Alamo. Fess Parker became my newest hero, a decade or so later to largely relive the similar frontier adventures, only this time in the form of Daniel Boone. And, yes, I had a Davy Crockett coonskin hat which I proudly wore.

Sometimes I lie awake at night... — Davy Crockett, King of the Wild  Frontier (1955) ...  1950s BOY DRESSED IN COONSKIN HAT & FRINGED VEST LIKE DAVY CROCKETT  OUTDOORS IN BARN WINDOW Stock Photo - Alamy

Also with Disney, of course, were two seasons of the exciting adventures of Zorro, featuring dashing Guy Williams in his pre-Lost in Space days. Still with the merchandising, I bought a Zorro plastic toy (err, action figure) who, if I recall correctly, had a horse with him, as well.

Guy Williams Posed wearing Zorro Outfit With Sword' Photo - Movie Star News  | AllPosters.com  1950s Lido Walt Disney 4.5 Mounted Zorro Black Plastic - Etsy Canada

Not long after this I would be deep into weekly viewings of The Rifleman, with Chuck Connors and that loop lever winchester that Connors always looked so great spinning and rapid firing (with amplified sound effects). Talk about cool!

The Rifleman Intro GIF | Gfycat

I later wondered about Lucas McCain's death toll because it seems to me that he was reluctantly pushed into mowing down at least three or four bad guys in close to every episode. Of course, there was also Johnny Crawford as his son Mark. Lucas could get a bit patronizing with his stern morality lecturing to Mark much of the time, especially for someone who had gunned down more people than Billy the Kid, Jesse James and Doc Holiday combined. But, as a kid, I never thought about this kind of stuff. Connors was definitely hero worshipped in my young eyes. I think I even had a Rifleman rifle for a while as a kid. My parents forked out a small fortune to keep me happily immersed in TV merchandising.

Now a lot of these shows are currently available on DVD and even some television stations. The early kiddie stuff, such as Cisco Kid, Wild Bill Hickok and Ramar, is probably best left to my rose coloured childhood imagination. However, I've seen some of the Disney stuff, as well as episodes of The Rifleman and they still hold up pretty well to my eyes. In fact I recorded the entire Rifleman series when Encore Westerns broadcast it ten or fifteen years ago.

So anyone else with nostalgic recollections of television series from the '50s or early 60s?

I always wonder who Lucas McCain was shooting at. Surely he didn't want to get rid of the audience. But that's where the gun is pointed. It's a good thing he was friends with the local sheriff, Micah or he might have gotten in some trouble doing that sort of stuff.

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4 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

I always wonder who Lucas McCain was shooting at. Surely he didn't want to get rid of the audience. But that's where the gun is pointed. It's a good thing he was friends with the local sheriff, Micah or he might have gotten in some trouble doing that sort of stuff.

Actually, if I recall correctly, Lucas came to Micah's assistance with that rifle on countless occasions. One of my favourite Rifleman episodes, for example, was called Gunfire and  featured Lon Chaney as a notorious gunfighter incarcerated by a nervous Micah. Chaney kept laughing and gloating behind the bars, confident that his gang would show up in town to get him out of jail. Chaney is genuinely creepy is his role (his then craggy features adding to it). It was nice to see a TV western offer him  a good villainy opportunity at a time in his career when he was appearing in a lot of ultra cheap horror films. Anyway, Lucas would be there with his rifle to assist Micah when the gang arrived, of course. That episode ended with a good explosion of what its episode title promised.

The Rifleman & Other TV Westerns - General Discussions - TCM Message Boards

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As well as being Bill Hickock's sidekick Andy Devine also had Andy's Gang on Saturday mornings. It was stupid fun for kids the way Rocky and Bullwinkle were later, a little subversive in just the right way for kids. Froggy the Gremlin was a great mischief maker and all the kids rooted him on. The way Andy interacted with Froggy and Midnight the Cat must have been a reference point for Pee-Wee's Playhouse years later. I never cared all that much for Howdy Doody, but I adored Andy's Gang.

I grew up watching the Boston stations and I don't know what it was like elsewhere, but wrestling was a big thing (Killer Kowalski was the local hero/villain.) and also bowling, of all things, which our family somehow became addicted to, even though we never bowled ourselves. 

 OIP.np4mjCGNQnDQJq1IZyR58QAAAA?w=170&h=1

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I have memories of watching The Mickey Mouse Club on TV on  weekly basis as a kid

M I Ceee

K E Yyyy

Why? Because we like you!

M O U S E

800px-Mickey_Mouse_Club_Mouseketeers_195

The Mouseketeers, with leader Jimmie at the top

 

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The truth is I would soon outgrow Mickey, who I found pretty sappy as a character. In fact I felt the same way about all the Disney cartoon favourites, even Donald Duck.

On the other hand I never lost my love for this cwazy character who I also grew up with on television.

gameraboy: Is there a doctor in the house? ... / aslan karatsev supremacy

I can still put on a good Bugs Bunny cartoon, such as Rabbit Fire (full credit to Daffy Duck on this one, of course, along with Bugs' other frequent teamings with him) or Bugs Bunny and the Three Bears and get just as big a kick out of it as I did as a kid.

Duck Season Fire GIFs | Tenor

 

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Never cared for Mickey Mouse Club shows.  I do recall the westerns of the late 50's/early 60's era though.  Riverboat is one that sticks in my mind, although it did not last too long. 

Most of these are available on YouTube or Tubi now.  Free with ads just like in the good old days.  But ad placement is kind of weird.

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21 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Man! You cats are O-L-D!

I was in swaddling clothes when the programs you listed were broadcast. I caught some of them as reruns (Sky King was shown on Saturday mornings on L.A. TV during the 1960s).

I wasn't much of a Westerns fan. My Boob Tube tastes ran toward Horror and Science-Fiction TV shows. Like for instance:

 

One Step Beyond
To me, One Step Beyond had the eeriest TV theme ("Weird" composed by Harry Lubin) I've ever heard!

hmuit3puybp11.png

 

 

Man!  I LOVED ONE STEP BEYOND  Which was the precursor to THE TWILIGHT ZONE, which was precursor to THE OUTER LIMITS and the rest.

I still have the old vinyl LP of "Music From" the show.  Actually my introduction to the Theremin.

 

21 hours ago, johnpressman said:

In the Late 1950s and early 1960s the TV airwaves were dominated by Western shows.  Each one had a theme song, I can still remember most of words of of the various songs even after these many years.  The "Jim Bowie" show was unique in that, besides a theme song ( "Jim Bowie, Jim Bowie, he was a bold and adventurous man!")  it also had a male chorus accompanying the title character's movements!

Yeah.  And too bad I can't recall offhand ALL the lyrics to some of 'em.  But here goes..

"Back when the west was very young/  There lived a man named Masterson/"

"He wore a cane and derby hat/  They called him Bat...Bat Masterson."  

 

*************************************************

"Wyatt Earp, Wyatt Earp/

Brave, Courageous and bold!/"

"Long live his fame, and long live his glory/

And long may his story be told."  

**************************************************************

"Lawman.  The lawman came with the sun/

There was a job to be done/ And so they sent for the badge and the gun/

Of the LAWMAN."

:) 

There's other verses to the Bat Masterson theme song, but I never got them down.

21 hours ago, Dargo said:

And re the 1950s television westerns...

Because I was always SO much more mature than my contemporaries back then (cough cough) I have to say that my favorite western back then was the more adult-oriented Maverick.

(...Garner was just too darn cool...and funny...not too many of the western leads back then played at being funny, ya know)

That's true.  Same goes with another favorite of mine , HAVE GUN WILL TRAVEL.   Maverick's big draw was not only Garner's good looks but the humor angle of a western TV series, while the difference in HGWT  was Richard Boone's Paladin being a well-read and educated man of good taste and intelligence. Something also not seen in many western heroes.  Plus, as you know, my favorite gimmick of that cool gun belt with the little derringer hidden by the belt's buckle.  ;) 

Sepiatone

 

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I particularly loved the series that took place in Africa and India: Jungle Jim, Ramar, and Sheena. Many of these programs ended with everyone laughing as some chimp antic.

cast.jpg

ramar3.jpg?fit=1845,1410&ssl=1

 

actress-irish-mccalla-as-sheena-in-telev

I also loved The Last of the Mohicans, with Lon Chaney Jr. as Chingachgook. 

sddefault.jpg

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, TomJH said:

I have memories of watching The Mickey Mouse Club on TV on  weekly basis as a kid

M I Ceee

K E Yyyy

Why? Because we like you!

M O U S E

If Julie London had been on The Mickey Mouse Club, I probably would have tuned in to it.

 

Kinda makes one want to commit an unnatural act with one's television set, don't it?

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14 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

If Julie London had been on The Mickey Mouse Club, I probably would have tuned in to it.

 

Kinda makes one want to commit an unnatural act with one's television set, don't it?

I find the album title more intriguing: Nice Girls Don't Stay for Breakfast.  A song previously unknown to me...

It was written by her husband, Bobby Troup, along with Jerome Leshay, who was also a TV director.  And, of course, both Troup and London were on Emergency!  Troup also wrote the theme to Route 66.

The lyrics:

Nice girls don't stay for breakfast
That's what they all say
From New York to Rome
 
Emily Post would surely say to her host
I've dug the evening the most
But please take me home
 
Nice girls don't stay for breakfast
And I'm a nice girl
You know that I am
 
If you're impressed
With these words I professed
I have just one small request
 
Pass the jam
Please pass the jam
Pass the jam

 

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2 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

If Julie London had been on The Mickey Mouse Club, I probably would have tuned in to it.

 

Kinda makes one want to commit an unnatural act with one's television set, don't it?

Whoa BABY!!!!

Perhaps another case of that whole "great minds thinking alike" thing coming up here EPM, but within the Noir Alley thread the other day I asked if Vince Edwards always played nothing but "sullen" and included my memory of him even playing his most remembered character Ben Casey in this manner.

Vautrin then replied to my comment by saying he never watched those old hospital-themed shows, and after he did I'll now admit I came THIS close to replying back to him with something along the lines of: "Really, Vautrin? Not EVEN that Jack Webb-produced one "Emergency" that starred that sexy and sultry as all hell Julie London???"

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I recall (unfortunately) a day time TV show called Queen For A Day (which had originated on radio). It consisted of four ordinary women talking to host Jack Bailey before a live audience. Each had to tell Bailey the troubling, sad circumstances of their lives and tell him what it would take to help them.

Towards the end of the show the four women would sit in a row and the audience would clap, with an "applause meter" registering the winner with the one receiving the loudest applause (invariably the woman with the saddest story). The winner would then be draped in a robe and have a crown placed on her head to the sounds of Pomp and Circumstance being played over a speaker. She, the Queen, would then win whatever she asked for plus a slew of other prizes. The other three contestants wound up with nothing.

I always found it degrading for a show to blatantly exploit the misery of four women's lives as they would, essentially, grovel in public to win a prize. Many of the women would break down in tears as they told their stories. And the host, Bailey, trying to keep things up beat, I suppose, always came across to me, instead, with the loud mouthed sensitivity of a carnival barker. Here's one episode:

 

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38 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I recall (unfortunately) a day time TV show called Queen For A Day (which had originated on radio). It consisted of four ordinary women talking to host Jack Bailey before a live audience. Each had to tell Bailey the troubling, sad circumstances of their lives and tell him what it would take to help them.

Towards the end of the show the four women would sit in a row and the audience would clap, with an "applause meter" registering the winner with the one receiving the loudest applause (invariably the woman with the saddest story).

Oh yeah, I remember sitting in front of that Philco TV set and watching this lame show as a wee tyke myself, Tom.

Yep, I'll never forget that time this one woman wearing a mink stole walked on stage and told Jack Bailey about the time she had misplaced the keys to her Cadillac and it taking 15 minutes for her to find them before she could drive herself to the beauty salon and so being late for her appointment.

And even at only 6 years old, I knew SHE probably wasn't going to become "Queen for a Day"!

(...naaah, not really...jus' kiddin'...but I DO remember watching that lame show, nonetheless)

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18 hours ago, TomJH said:

I have memories of watching The Mickey Mouse Club on TV on  weekly basis as a kid

M I Ceee

K E Yyyy

I remember seeing truncated MMC reruns syndicated in the 70's, and it wasn't until seeing the two DVD boxsets turn up as Disney+ streaming choices that I ever learned the original 50's episodes were an hour long.

(And showed actual Disney cartoons, rather than the 30's Silly Symphonies that the 70's reruns always showed because the famous characters were too guarded an IP.)

-----

While staying in the 50's, I dug up a DVD boxset of This is Your Life (the US version, rather than the UK version that ran with their own obscure celebs for 30 years), and--putting all memories of Sid Caesar and a hundred other variety-show parodies of it aside--found it completely addictive.  From the days when we actually liked celebrities, and seeing them go all giddy over reunions (and seeing Boris ready to stop the show just to chat with his old school chum) is actually less sappy than it sounds:

And on YouTube, became hooked on rare lost-kinescope broadcasts of Your Hit Parade from 1951-1955.   No guests, no sketches, just songs, and watching them come up with a different production-number premise for the same running hit five or six weeks in a row, and whether their repertory could meet the challenge:

(I'd first run into it in a short-lived summer 70's reboot, and had been looking for reruns of those ever since.)

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6 hours ago, Dargo said:

Oh yeah, I remember sitting in front of that Philco TV set and watching this lame show as a wee tyke myself, Tom.

Yep, I'll never forget that time this one woman wearing a mink stole walked on stage and told Jack Bailey about the time she had misplaced the keys to her Cadillac and it taking 15 minutes for her to find them before she could drive herself to the beauty salon and so being late for her appointment.

And even at only 6 years old, I knew SHE probably wasn't going to become "Queen for a Day"!

(...naaah, not really...jus' kiddin'...but I DO remember watching that lame show, nonetheless)

Queen For A Day was really a ghastly exercise in bad taste. I was surprised, in viewing that episode of the show that I posted above, that Jeanne Cagney, Jimmy's sister, appeared on it, not as one of the sad women trying to win a prize, but as an announcer of some models who were wearing the latest fashions. Jeanne had had a brief Hollywood career as an actress, having a handful of roles, including playing George M. Cohan's sister in Yankee Doodle Dandy. It goes to show how her show biz career had obviously fallen off the map by 1960 when she appeared in Queen for a Day (I suspect, with her presentation on this episode, that she was actually a regular on the show).

1958 QUEEN FOR DAY TV SHOW - JACK BAILEY, JEANNE CAGNEY - video Dailymotion1962 Jeanne Cagney Jack Bailey HandKercheif - Historic Images

Jeanne Cagney List of Movies and TV Shows - TV Guide

That's Jeanne, to Cagney's right behind him, in the highlight film of her career.

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3 hours ago, EricJ said:

I remember seeing truncated MMC reruns syndicated in the 70's, and it wasn't until seeing the two DVD boxsets turn up as Disney+ streaming choices that I ever learned the original 50's episodes were an hour long.

(And showed actual Disney cartoons, rather than the 30's Silly Symphonies that the 70's reruns always showed because the famous characters were too guarded an IP.)

-----

While staying in the 50's, I dug up a DVD boxset of This is Your Life (the US version, rather than the UK version that ran with their own obscure celebs for 30 years), and--putting all memories of Sid Caesar and a hundred other variety-show parodies of it aside--found it completely addictive.  From the days when we actually liked celebrities, and seeing them go all giddy over reunions (and seeing Boris ready to stop the show just to chat with his old school chum) is actually less sappy than it sounds:

And on YouTube, became hooked on rare lost-kinescope broadcasts of Your Hit Parade from 1951-1955.   No guests, no sketches, just songs, and watching them come up with a different production-number premise for the same running hit five or six weeks in a row, and whether their repertory could meet the challenge:

(I'd first run into it in a short-lived summer 70's reboot, and had been looking for reruns of those ever since.)

Didn't care much for This is Your Life and vaguely recall Your Hit Parade.   In 1954 we didn't have a TV.

Wonder if Sterling-Cooper (Mad Men) had something to do with that Lucky Strike commercial?  This was back in the day when cigarettes were good for you.

It also was a period when it took two companies to sponsor one TV show.  Even when Route 66 came out in 1960, Chevrolet only sponsored every other week.  I have some DVD's of commercials from the 50's and later that are fairly interesting.  Watch them while I ride my exercise bike - don't require much attention and can stop whenever I want.

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I've read that Stan Laurel was annoyed when he and Oliver Hardy were caught unexpectedly by This Is Your Life. This was, I believe, the only time the comedy team appeared live on television (in 1954).

 

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4 hours ago, EricJ said:

I remember seeing truncated MMC reruns syndicated in the 70's, and it wasn't until seeing the two DVD boxsets turn up as Disney+ streaming choices that I ever learned the original 50's episodes were an hour long.

(And showed actual Disney cartoons, rather than the 30's Silly Symphonies that the 70's reruns always showed because the famous characters were too guarded an IP.)

-----

While staying in the 50's, I dug up a DVD boxset of This is Your Life (the US version, rather than the UK version that ran with their own obscure celebs for 30 years), and--putting all memories of Sid Caesar and a hundred other variety-show parodies of it aside--found it completely addictive.  From the days when we actually liked celebrities, and seeing them go all giddy over reunions (and seeing Boris ready to stop the show just to chat with his old school chum) is actually less sappy than it sounds:

And on YouTube, became hooked on rare lost-kinescope broadcasts of Your Hit Parade from 1951-1955.   No guests, no sketches, just songs, and watching them come up with a different production-number premise for the same running hit five or six weeks in a row, and whether their repertory could meet the challenge:

(I'd first run into it in a short-lived summer 70's reboot, and had been looking for reruns of those ever since.)

I didn't know Hit Parade had a TV show. Thanks for posting this. The opening number made me think of Hellzapoppin with all those devilish dancers. Love the home permanent commercial too!

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15 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

If Julie London had been on The Mickey Mouse Club, I probably would have tuned in to it.

By the time I was old enough to properly appreciate the provocative  Ms. London I was past watching the Mickey Mouse Club.

And Annette  Funicello  was good enough for me.  ;) 

                                                                                                 193504__01046.1519599470.1280.1280.jpg?c

 

                                           But then too, as I got older.....

                                                                                        ANNETTE-FUNICELLO-WOW-8X10-PHOTO.jpg

 

                                                                                                                                          So did she.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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5 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

I didn't know Hit Parade had a TV show. Thanks for posting this. The opening number made me think of Hellzapoppin with all those devilish dancers. Love the home permanent commercial too!

By the time it had been on the air long enough, Steve Allen, on his show, did a parody of YHP's live-TV production-number premises:  🤣

(Although I haven't seen enough of Steve Allen to comment on that for a 50s-TV thread.  ☺️ )

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6 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

By the time I was old enough to properly appreciate the provocative  Ms. London I was past watching the Mickey Mouse Club.

And Annette  Funicello  was good enough for me.  ;)

Flo (Mark Volman) and Eddie (Howard Kaylan) quipped about tuning in to The Mickey Mouse Club and watching Annette Funicello's breasts develop.

41hXYoOW+3L._AC_.jpg    2c1f836eeb9c2d1fc6b785b22576686e.jpg     6ef3b06bb41bc9f09b97eacc922068a7.jpg

s-l500.jpg     il_1140xN.3276686461_9mcq.jpg   5592c001638e3fec39562d0b4956a2d8.jpg    

floeddie.jpg&ehk=tFItebc6UgRaTTD1GEC+P

Why? Because we like 'em!

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On 9/7/2022 at 1:52 PM, EricJ said:

By the time it had been on the air long enough, Steve Allen, on his show, did a parody of YHP's live-TV production-number premises:  🤣

(Although I haven't seen enough of Steve Allen to comment on that for a 50s-TV thread.  ☺️ )

I love Martha Raye, don't you? Yeah, so anyway, you got me hooked on the Hit Parade Show. I love the music and the premise. Great fun!

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On 9/7/2022 at 12:39 PM, Sepiatone said:

 193504__01046.1519599470.1280.1280.jpg?c

Annette was a home town gal for us Upstate NYers. Glad she kept her ethnic name. Utica is now an empty shell of a cracktown. The only survivors are Utica Club Brewery & Italian Food manufacturers (which are yummy)

Well I must be just a tad younger (YAY!) than you guys based on your recollections. I pretty much watched THE WILD WILD WEST and STAR TREK because that's what my older brother watched. Apparently that developed my attraction to tough Bantam built guys, haha.

Bewitched was the show I'd watch every week & my brother had to watch it, like it or not. While Barbara Eden was adorable, I thought I Dream Of Jeannie was stupid, at least Jeannie was stupid for kowtowing to "Master" (Soo=Future Feminist)

At 9, Sesame Street was too juvenile for me- thank goodness for After School Specials! I've revisited some of those & they're pretty good, kind of like Hallmark movies having pretty good actors & good production values. I hated any Schwartz productions like Gilligan's Island and The Brady Bunch-even as a child found them insipid & insulting. 

I still find kids shows/movies pandering....didn't WE all watch adult TV/movies? We may not have completely understood some adult nuances, but we still watched & enjoyed them. (I live by that and as a teacher NEVER talked down to my 3rd graders) It's one reason why WB cartoons endure through the ages, the very definition of "classic".

I still love catching these shows on TV although I have them on DVD. There is something about turning on your TV and not choosing the episode, it's random and exciting when you recognize "it's THIS episode!" I think all this streaming and "on demand" watching can be a bore. People brag about binge-watching a series and to me that reduces my enjoyment of watching & savoring each new episode on it's own.

Some people enjoy taking their time and others like quickies, heh.

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