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Is greed the reason college is so expensive?


Marysara1
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Harvard To Pay Elizabeth Warren $400,000 To Teach Class On Why College Is So Expensive | Babylon Bee Some colleges pay over $100,000 for certain people to give a speech. Biden earned up to $200,000 for paid speeches after leaving office: report | The Hill If the democrats are so worried about student debt. Why didn't they do things for less money?  Isn't it enough compensation to better youth's minds?

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6 hours ago, Marysara1 said:

Harvard To Pay Elizabeth Warren $400,000 To Teach Class On Why College Is So Expensive | Babylon Bee Some colleges pay over $100,000 for certain people to give a speech. Biden earned up to $200,000 for paid speeches after leaving office: report | The Hill If the democrats are so worried about student debt. Why didn't they do things for less money?  Isn't it enough compensation to better youth's minds?

Good question, but this is a mere trickle in why colleges cost so much.  

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Why Is College So Expensive?

https://thebestschools.org/resources/college-finances/why-is-college-expensive/

Why is college so expensive? There are a lot of reasons — growing demand, rising financial aid, lower state funding, the exploding cost of administrators, bloated student amenities packages. The most expensive colleges — Columbia, Vassar, Duke — will run you well over $50K a year just for tuition. That doesn't even include housing! 

 

This is why I took a correspondence course - NTS  (National Technical Schools) during the early 1970's.  

Advantage is the low cost but disadvantage you don't get the hands on experience.  They offered TV / radio repair, air conditioning / cooling, industrial electronics.  There were other NTI, Bell & Howell.

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Another thing one could take are trade schools", one learned a craft.

4 REASONS WHY HIGH SCHOOL GRADS SHOULD CONSIDER GOING TO A TRADE SCHOOL

https://www.thetrainingcenterofairconditioningandheating.com/hvac-career/4-reasons-high-school-grads-should-go-to-trade-school/

 

My high school had it's own trade school which was free - course started during the 10th grade - it included carpentry, electrician, construction. 

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15 minutes ago, hamradio said:

Another thing one could take are trade schools", one learned a craft.

4 REASONS WHY HIGH SCHOOL GRADS SHOULD CONSIDER GOING TO A TRADE SCHOOL

https://www.thetrainingcenterofairconditioningandheating.com/hvac-career/4-reasons-high-school-grads-should-go-to-trade-school/

 

My high school had it's own trade school which was free - course started during the 10th grade - it included carpentry, electrician, construction. 

Back in the '60's there was big push for states to offer super low cost post-secondary technical/vocational schools.  They were very successful and industries and businesses helped provide the training for people they would hire.

Now they have all become community colleges and at many (most?) the number one major is college transfer so they can transfer to a four year college.  No vocational or technical (job) training.

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32 minutes ago, ElCid said:

Back in the '60's there was big push for states to offer super low cost post-secondary technical/vocational schools.  They were very successful and industries and businesses helped provide the training for people they would hire.

Now they have all become community colleges and at many (most?) the number one major is college transfer so they can transfer to a four year college.  No vocational or technical (job) training.

The Vo-Tech campus opened in my hometown in the early 1960s, originally as an alternative to the more academic offerings of the local high school.  It's still a Vo-Tech center (now renamed Career Technology Center), but has expanded to include neighboring school districts and offering more opportunities to adults . 

My brother went there his junior and senior years of HS, taking drafting classes (this was the early 1970s, before the rise of CAD/CAM).  He spent half a day there, and the other half at the HS.  They also offer classes to adults in the evenings.  My Dad took a woodworking class there.  They offer classes in a broad range of vocational areas: auto technologies, aviation, police, biotech, construction/architecture, computing & robotics, cosmetology, dental hygiene, nursing, media.  They also work with local businesses to develop training programs for their employees.

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The OP begins with a link to the Babylon Bee....

In case anyone here doesn't know, the Babylon Bee is the conservative answer to The Onion. In other words, it's a "humor" site, and the headlines are fabricated jokes.

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2 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

The Vo-Tech campus opened in my hometown in the early 1960s, originally as an alternative to the more academic offerings of the local high school.  It's still a Vo-Tech center (now renamed Career Technology Center), but has expanded to include neighboring school districts and offering more opportunities to adults . 

My brother went there his junior and senior years of HS, taking drafting classes (this was the early 1970s, before the rise of CAD/CAM).  He spent half a day there, and the other half at the HS.  They also offer classes to adults in the evenings.  My Dad took a woodworking class there.  They offer classes in a broad range of vocational areas: auto technologies, aviation, police, biotech, construction/architecture, computing & robotics, cosmetology, dental hygiene, nursing, media.  They also work with local businesses to develop training programs for their employees.

Not what I was referring to.  School districts also offer vocational-technical schools as adjunct to regular high school education.  I was referring to vocational-technical schools for students after graduating from high school.  These were to teach more employment related, direct entry type jobs.

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1 hour ago, ElCid said:

Not what I was referring to.  School districts also offer vocational-technical schools as adjunct to regular high school education.  I was referring to vocational-technical schools for students after graduating from high school.  These were to teach more employment related, direct entry type jobs.

That school serves both functions.  They offer career training programs for adults, and tailored programs for specific industries.

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Like most businesses colleges charge what the freight  can  bear. Our local two-year community college is very vocation orientated.

Now  that craft  beer brewing is such a big deal around here they have classes for that. If a concentration camp opened..........

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2 hours ago, ElCid said:

Not what I was referring to.  School districts also offer vocational-technical schools as adjunct to regular high school education.  I was referring to vocational-technical schools for students after graduating from high school.  These were to teach more employment related, direct entry type jobs.

Where I went to high school, they always offered opportunities for students to attend the regular vo-tech school after they completed or while they completed their required high school diploma courses.

And they still do.

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Guess I mislead some people.  My post re: vocational/technical post high school schools is referring to the community colleges no longer really emphasizing training for direct entry into jobs.  Instead they have become preparatory schools for four year colleges.  And this adds to the excessive cost of college educations  by creating more "customers" for their high priced educations.

State governments need to get back to offering cheap vocational/technical educations both in high schools and post  high school.  Then clamp down on state supported schools on costs.  It may even require states to set limits on how many students each state supported school can admit or penalize them for students not completing a four year program.

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