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Jean-Luc Godard (1930-2022)


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One of the unforgettable moments of Godard's "Bande à Part" (1964) was a café dance sequence  featuring his muse Anna Karina and co-stars Claude Brasseur and Sami Frey.  The film became a favorite of Quentin Tarantino's. The American filmmaker even named his production company A Band Apart, and created a memorable dance scene for his acclaimed 1994 picture "Pulp Fiction."

 

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His films not only jumped off the screen, but you wished you could leave your seat and walk into the screen and be part of that exhilarating experience. The video from Bande à Part Jakeem  posted is what I’m talking about. Godard’s work still retains that wonderful spontaneity.

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Director Jean-Luc Godard dies aged 91 as fans pay tribute to the godfather of France's New Wave cinema who inspired Tarantino and Scorsese

Director Jean-Luc Godard dies aged 91

Film director Jean-Luc Godard died on Tuesday aged 91. The legendary Franco-Swiss movie-maker was one of the world's most acclaimed directors, known for French New Wave films Breathless and Contempt, which inspired a generation of directors including Quentin Tarantino and Martin Scorsese. Friends close to Godard revealed his death on Tuesday in French newspaper Liberation. A cause of death is yet to be revealed.

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1 hour ago, nakano said:

Assisted suicide,legal in Switzerland ,he lived there almost his whole life.

Nah, that was Alain Delon who said he wanted to kill himself recently. Godard was just an old fook or else the CIA killed him for his pro-Putin stance.

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29 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Coca-Cola and  capitalism are  still  around. Sometimes life just isn't  fair. 

Well western Capitalism and NATO too in particular. It was Donetsk and Luhansk he really fought for in his final years. They probably usurped the place in his heart he had for Mao.

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1 hour ago, Sukhov said:

Well western Capitalism and NATO too in particular. It was Donetsk and Luhansk he really fought for in his final years. They probably usurped the place in his heart he had for Mao.

Yeah, Mao hasn't exactly worn  too well over  the last  forty years. I   haven't  seen too many of Godard's  later films, but I  enjoyed  many of  his

1960s films, especially  the ones with a groups of  young  and  amateur guerillas running around.   Alphaville is funny. A  deadpan Eddie Constantine

looking like he's in an  American  gangster film when he isn't.  Tout  Va Bien with Jane Fonda was the most boring Godard film I ever saw.  Just  get

it over with.

 

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2 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Yeah, Mao hasn't exactly worn  too well over  the last  forty years. I   haven't  seen too many of Godard's  later films, but I  enjoyed  many of  his

1960s films, especially  the ones with a groups of  young  and  amateur guerillas running around.   Alphaville is funny. A  deadpan Eddie Constantine

looking like he's in an  American  gangster film when he isn't.  Tout  Va Bien with Jane Fonda was the most boring Godard film I ever saw.  Just  get

it over with.

 

My favorite might be "The Carabiniers" or at least I consider it his most underrated. I find it to be a very silly parody of the mercenary like nature of the army and it is much more deprecating than most anti-war movies which tend to make light of war itself. I think in the foreign language thread I listed that film in my top ten of the 60s but I do not remember exactly.

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5 hours ago, Sukhov said:

This Instagram feed is one of the last appearances of Godard as far as I can tell.

Here's a version of the same interview with English subtitles.  Seems to have been filmed near the beginning of COVID (based on the conversation at the beginning).

 

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3 hours ago, Sukhov said:

My favorite might be "The Carabiniers" or at least I consider it his most underrated. I find it to be a very silly parody of the mercenary like nature of the army and it is much more deprecating than most anti-war movies which tend to make light of war itself. I think in the foreign language thread I listed that film in my top ten of the 60s but I do not remember exactly.

I  liked  that one, though I haven't seen it  in a  long time. I'm looking forward  to the TCM tribute to Godard, which I presume they  will be

doing.

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1 hour ago, Princess of Tap said:

Yeah, but you can be happy that the International Herald Tribune is now defunct.

I always thought that name was funny as  the New York Herald Tribune was no longer in business  after 1966.

Of course it made no difference to me, though Jean  Seberg is  now out of a job.

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