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Actors or actresses who do short impressions(imitations) of other famous actors or actresses (usually to get a laugh...OR not) during the course of a movie.


Dargo
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Marion Davies spoofs Garbo during a party scene in BLONDIE OF THE FOLLIES (1932).

And one might argue that Carole Lombard's entire performance of a woman masquerading as Scandinavian royalty in THE PRINCESS COMES ACROSS (1936) is a cheeky satire of Garbo.

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There is a form of imitation in: Kelly's Heroes (1970). Clint Eastwood, Telly Savalas and Donald Sutherland are walking abreast to confront the commander of the Tiger tank which is protecting the bank. The music changes to that of a spaghetti western and the sound of jingling spurs is heard despite no one wearing spurs. It is Clint Eastwood imitating Clint Eastwood in: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966).

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In the film Stalag 17, actor/comedian Jay Lawrence (and brother of Larry Storch) is given a few scenes in which he does impressions of James Cagney, Ronald Colman, Clark Gable, and yes and even though not an "actor", a very funny one of Adolf Hitler...

 

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17 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

Spencer Tracy mimics Katharine Hepburn's accent for a line or two in Guess Who's Coming to Dinner.

Anthony Hopkins modeled Hannibal Lecter's accent off of Katherine Hepburn's.

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Cloud Atlas.  - Practically/Pretty Much Most, if not the Entire Cast for the Entire Film.

Blade Runner 2049.  - This One's a Three-way; during one scene - quite literally. Perhaps even a four-way at times. Ryan Gosling in a Career Performance, Ana De Armas, Mackenzie Davis, and Harrison Ford.

The Master.  - Towards the end of said film; Phoenix and Seymour-Hoffman are Conversing.  As the Discussion and Conversation Continues - Hoffman starts softly singing and Phoenix (subsuquently, after a bit)  starts crying.     While subjective; during the entire duration of this scene there are overtones of Marlon Brando and "I Could Have Been a Contender" at play.

Dreamland.  - Margot Robbie and Finn Cole, as Bonnie & Clyde.

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52 minutes ago, Sukhov said:

Anthony Hopkins modeled Hannibal Lecter's accent off of Katherine Hepburn's.

From what I could find about this on the internet Sukhov, it appears Hepburn was just one of his inspirations for the accent he used. 

Here's an excerpt from one source I was able to find:

As the actor explained to Vanity Fair, Hannibal's voice and demeanour was directly inspired by drama teacher Christopher Fettes at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. "There was a teacher we had, a Stanislavsky method teacher, and he was lethal. He would just take you apart intellectually," he explained. "He'd just smirk, and he'd say, 'No. Do it again'... I based it on him: 'No, Clarice.'"

Hopkins also described Fettes as a man with "a cutting voice" that could "slice you to pieces" -– a perfect attribute for a serial killing cannibal (via Empire ). "His analysis of what you were doing was so precise; it's a method that stayed with me for all of my life." But it wasn't just his drama teacher that influenced the voice, Hopkins used a combination of three specific accents to perfect Hannibal's tone -– that of Katharine Hepburn, Truman Capote, and H.A.L. from "2001: A Space Odyssey".

(...but if you ask me after just now also watching the famous "Chianti and fava beans" scene on YouTube, it almost sounds to me as if he was doing a bit of a Brando impression as well)

 

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25 minutes ago, Aritosthenes said:

Cloud Atlas.  - Practically/Pretty Much Most, if not the Entire Cast for the Entire Film.

Blade Runner 2049.  - This One's a Three-way; during one scene - quite literally. Perhaps even a four-way at times. Ryan Gosling in a Career Performance, Ana De Armas, Mackenzie Davis, and Harrison Ford.

The Master.  - Towards the end of said film; Phoenix and Seymour-Hoffman are Conversing.  As the Discussion and Conversation Continues - Hoffman starts softly singing and Phoenix (subsuquently, after a bit)  starts crying.     While subjective; during the entire duration of this scene there are overtones of Marlon Brando and "I Could Have Been a Contender" at play.

Dreamland.  - Margot Robbie and Finn Cole, as Bonnie & Clyde.

But do these actors at some point in these films actually attempt to do vocal impressions of famous actors in these films, Ari?

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44 minutes ago, Dargo said:

But do these actors at some point in these films actually attempt to do vocal impressions of famous actors in these films, Ari?

While not ironclad, I think that could be argued in the affirmative.   If, a respective actor or actress is Immersive "Enough", they can become another performer in more than one way. 

  I think - the magnification (and thus the similarities) has the propensity to change and fluctuate with respect to the script, storyline, performers, and/or even possibly the Director.

  With (respect to) Your example Dargs; there is absolutely a (strongly) visual and audible similarity at play. With that said, Tony Curtis and Cary Grant (obviously) have two Very distinctive different unique voices, in pitch and timbre.  One can Definitely differentiate.  Yet the similarities; as You astutely point out, are still (undeniably) there. 

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Plus he imitates Fred Astaire's dance style while dancing on the bar.

And while Frances Dade imitating the Count's "weird" foreign accent in Dracula (1931) became the first person ever to imitate Bela Lugosi onscreen, she can't hold a candle to Fred Astaire's dead-on replication, as a "Russian" ballet star, in Shall We Dance (1937):

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Buster Keaton parodied William S. Hart in The Frozen North (1922).

Raymond Massey in Arsenic and Old Lace (1944) channeled Boris Karloff, who had played the role onstage.

Tony Curtis has said that his character of "Josephine" in Some Like it Hot (1959) was a mixture of his mother, Grace Kelly, and Eve Arden.  (The voice was dubbed by Paul Frees.)

Jean-Paul Belmondo famously rubs his thumb across his lips in Breathless (1960), in imitation of / tribute to Humphrey Bogart (who had died just a few years previously).

Diane Keaton imitates Marlon Brando as Stanley Kowalski in Sleeper (1973).

Daniel-Day Lewis's distinctive accent in There Will Be Blood (2007) seems to be a blend of John Huston and Adela Rogers St. John.

Alan Alda imitated Groucho Marx in an episode of M*A*S*H.

Nathan Lane and Robin Williams memorably imitated John Wayne in The Birdcage (1996):

 

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3 hours ago, Fausterlitz said:

Nathan Lane and Robin Williams memorably imitated John Wayne in The Birdcage (1996):

 

 Your John Wayne entry, Fausterlitz, reminded me of the Animal Mother/Private Joker exchange in Full Metal Jacket (1987).

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3 hours ago, Fausterlitz said:

Re: "Alan Alda imitated Groucho Marx in an episode of M*A*S*H."

 Since you dropped a television episode, Fausterlitz: Charlie Chaplin and the Keystone Cops in "DEATH IN SLOW MOTION" (BATMAN)...

 The episode fittingly featured Francis X. Bushman in, I think, his next-to-last acting appearance.

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