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COUNSELLOR AT LAW (1933) JOHN BARRYMORE BEBE DANIELS


Allhallowsday
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Watched COUNSELLOR AT LAW (1933)  tonight starring JOHN BARRYMORE  and BEBE DANIELS ... directed by WILLIAM WYLER and it showed a talented director's touch!  Wonderful cast!  I laughed, I was riveted, I thrilled to the snappy rapport.  I had not seen this one before, but I love JOHN BARRYMORE and he was a delight. 

330px-CounsellorAtLawPoster.jpg

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3 hours ago, TomJH said:

Barrymore has a truly remarkable moment when his character contemplates suicide at an open window of a high rise. He looks like a man staring into an abyss.

John Barrymore's suicide scene in Dinner at Eight...is heartbreaking..

He was indeed a wonderful actor...capable of great emotional depth...

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11 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

Watched COUNSELLOR AT LAW (1933)  tonight starring JOHN BARRYMORE  and BEBE DANIELS ... directed by WILLIAM WYLER and it showed a talented director's touch!  Wonderful cast!  I laughed, I was riveted, I thrilled to the snappy rapport.  I had not seen this one before, but I love JOHN BARRYMORE and he was a delight. 

330px-CounsellorAtLawPoster.jpg

First time I saw the film and it was good,   but that ending was so typically 30s;    Ok,  we are running out of film,  we need to end this  thing!

I liked the fact that Wyler gave that American commie that long speech about the working man and how the Barrymore character had sold out his fellow working man.   Then of course the commie dies.    The lawyer pays the mom $500 dollars and for the funeral,  but to me that came off as just being more of a sell out.  

I think it was great that TCM featured Bebe Daniels.    Stayed up late and watched The Maltese Falcon. 

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On 9/15/2022 at 6:15 AM, TomJH said:

He looks like a man staring into an abyss.

Like his heart-breaking part in DINNER AT EIGHT ...

On 9/15/2022 at 10:23 AM, Arteesto said:

John Barrymore's suicide scene in Dinner at Eight...is heartbreaking..

He was indeed a wonderful actor...capable of great emotional depth...

Without reading you immediately above my post, I wrote the same thing...

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13 hours ago, Terrapin said:

This one is quite a treat, an early masterpiece from Wyler featuring some snappy dialog delivered at a frenetic pace.  Barrymore is terrific, as are Daniels and Douglas.  

Yes, that fast paced dialog! You had to be on  your toes to follow it and get the humor. I hadn't seen this one before. Glad I caught it. Isabel Jewell was a hoot! It was very much a filmed stage play, but it didn't hurt the film  at all. Loved the art deco sets.

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After completing Councillor at Law Barrymore made a B at RKO, Long Lost Father. After completing that film he was called back to Universal to do one more scene for Councillor at Law (with actor John Qualen). Barrymore was tired that day and had had two beers. He blew his lines on the first take, and made a comic face that got some laughter on the set. But then he blew the scene on the second take. There was no laughter. Barrymore's mental block of his dialogue then rattled Qualen who blew his own lines upon which he had been previously letter perfect. Barrymore kept trying, blowing take after take. He started perspiring and got angry in his frustration. It was after about 25 blown takes that director William Wyler called the day's proceedings to a halt.

But the word got out that Barrymore couldn't remember his dialogue and his reputation for reliability as an actor became stained in Hollywood. Who knows what terrors the actor faced with his mental confusion as he started to lose one of the most precious possessions of an actor, his memory. Many people thought it was because of drink, an impression that Barrymore encouraged with time. Better to be considered a drunk than someone going senile.

COUNSELLOR AT LAW, John Qualen, John Barrymore, 1933 Courtesy Everett  Collection PUBLICATIONxINxGERxSUIxA

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

After completing Councillor at Law Barrymore made a B at RKO, Long Lost Father. After completing that film he was called back to Universal to do one more scene for Councillor at Law (with actor John Qualen). Barrymore was tired that day and had had two beers. He blew his lines on the first take, and made a comic face that got some laughter on the set. But then he blew the scene on the second take. There was no laughter. Barrymore's mental block of his dialogue then rattled Qualen who blew his own lines upon which he had been previously letter perfect. Barrymore kept trying, blowing take after take. He started perspiring and got angry in his frustration. It was after about 25 blown takes that director William Wyler called the day's proceedings to a halt.

But the word got out that Barrymore couldn't remember his dialogue and his reputation for reliability as an actor became stained in Hollywood. Who knows what terrors the actor faced with his mental confusion as he started to lose one of the most precious possessions of an actor, his memory. Many people thought it was because of drink, an impression that Barrymore encouraged with time. Better to be considered a drunk than someone going senile.

COUNSELLOR AT LAW, John Qualen, John Barrymore, 1933 Courtesy Everett  Collection PUBLICATIONxINxGERxSUIxA

Wow. Sad. It was nice to see Qualen w/out an accent.

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3 hours ago, Hibi said:

Yes, that fast paced dialog! You had to be on  your toes to follow it and get the humor. I hadn't seen this one before. Glad I caught it. Isabel Jewell was a hoot! It was very much a filmed stage play, but it didn't hurt the film  at all. Loved the art deco sets.

Yea,  I was sitting down to dinner with my wife and it made it hard to follow what was happening due to the fast paced dialog.   Yea,  Isabel Jewell was a hoot,  and  I wish she had a few more scenes.    The art deco office was the bomb.     I loved it but that commie didn't!  (ha ha).

 

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So how many viewing Councillor at Law realized that this boy . . .

Wyler, William

was future director Richard Quine, director of, among other films, Bell Book and Candle and The Solid Gold Cadillac, while the Commie . . .

Counsellor at Law (1933) - Turner Classic Movies

was Vincent Sherman, eventually director of The Hard Way, Mr. Skeffington and Adventures of Don Juan

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32 minutes ago, Allhallowsday said:

Good stuff!

Other very good films directed by Vincent Sherman while under contract with Warner Bros. were The Dammed Don't Cry  (Crawford \ Kent Smith),   The Young Philadelphians (Newman \ Barbara Rush),  the Bogart film All Through the Night,  and Nora Prentiss.  

Until I read it here I didn't know it was Sherman playing the commie in the Barrymore film.   

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1 hour ago, Allhallowsday said:

"... You  die  by  the knife...!"  :D

Flynn was a huge Barrymore fan. I have to wonder about any conversations he may have had with Vincent Sherman while making Don Juan with him about the latter's acting with the Great Profile in Councillor at Law.

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5 hours ago, Tikisoo said:

...and their successor Jack Cassidy. All cut from the same cloth-Cassidy from the remnants. 

Who was not their successor was John Drew Barrymore,  son of John.      I was watching Rawhide,  the Clint Eastwood T.V. western yesterday and John Drew was playing an Indian.    

The role would have been difficult for any non-Indian actor to pull off but with John Drew limitations,  the entire look,  persona and speaking was real bad.   Indian my foot!

    

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