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♠ Movies you used to like more than you do now ♠


Mr. Gorman
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I was pondering this question to myself after watching STAND BY ME (1986) a while back and then I noticed it was due for another airing on TCM.  I still like the movie -- don't get me wrong -- but there's an awful lot of cuss words in a movie that takes place in the late '50s.  I enjoy the nostalgia angle of the movie, too, but in truth I like it less now than I did 15 years ago just because the more times I watched it the more I felt all the bad words weren't necessary and weren't 'period authentic'.  Having grown up in the 1980s I was used to hearing cuss words all the time . . . but was it really like that in 1959?  → Did '50s kids really talk like they all frequented smoke-filled local pool rooms where the adults were cussing all day?  

So who else among the forum readers have a movie or two they used to like more than they do now and why. 

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love this topic. it especially applies to my music as well

"wuthering heights" i've seen more than any other fillum EVER,,,,to the point where i'm not so moved. but i remember when i saw it in a revival house in manhattan on the uws. there were people crying openly in the audience. i don't get teary eyed anymore. in fact, merle oberon wore out her welcome

"audition". seats were flipping up as people rushed out in droves with pure disgust and the women saying "ugh - eww" - the men stayed though. now that i know what to expect, it's not the same 

"the graduate". it was the thing back then but it didn't have the legs for me. i liked the acting but i never connected.

"the exorcist". it's shock value decreased over time.  "blazing saddles" - same

"way of the dragon" and "enter the dragon" . i only skip to the fight scenes now

 

and i agree with "stand by me"

 

 

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4 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

there's an awful lot of cuss words in a movie that takes place in the late '50s

Agreed. Nice people did not use those kinds of words, it was a sign of low class upbringing. If a middle class suburban kid cussed, their mouth would be washed out with soap.

I also agree with the OP that movies do not stand the test of time well because of previously unseen "contemporary" issues. When seeing Disney's ALADDIN '92, my friends raved about Robin Williams voicing the Genie and all I could think was: so many of the jokes/quips were political encompassing contemporary issues, how many would still be relevant or funny 20 years later?

Guess Who's Coming To Dinner? '67 is an often cited movie about "modern irrelevance" since younger people don't understand what interracial marriage could mean in 1960's American society. Just yesterday I heard a news story about a kid offended by a teacher not addressing him/her using the correct pronouns-kids today don't understand social pressure to fit in, instead it's all about society accommodating their "special needs".

Then there's the whole, "I'm not the same person at 55 that I was at 15" reaction to a movie. Watching classic movies as a teen, I didn't always "see" the POV the same as the character. Stella Dallas or Lady For A Day are two stories of self-sacrificing Moms that I wholly understand as an older woman, but thought rather stupid in my teens. This is why I often re-watch films to see if I like them better another time.

The movie doesn't change, you do.

 

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1 hour ago, Tikisoo said:

Then there's the whole, "I'm not the same person at 55 that I was at 15" reaction to a movie. Watching classic movies as a teen, I didn't always "see" the POV the same as the character.....

The movie doesn't change, you do.

 

Right, especially if drugs were involved. I found a cheap DVD of Zardoz (1974) a few years ago and finally got around to watching it. I'd seen it stoned when it was released and was captivated by all the moody theatrics, but this time it just seemed like a big manipulative mess. I was a fairly casual user, mostly for movies, but I can now see how easily I fell for shiny objects. Though some shiny objects, like the docking scene with the space station to the tune of The Blue Danube in 2001: A Space Odyssey, which I saw on acid in a Cinerama theater, have stayed with me to this day. And a few others, like Performance and The Man Who Fell to Earth, I still appreciate even without the drug-induced spell under which they were originally seen in my youth, but now I scratch my head about why I ever thought something like Zabriskie Point was "meaningful" and the answer is, of course, drugs.

Aladdin had its share of problems. The original introductory segment which was shown in theaters was widely criticized for racial stereotyping, so by the time the VHS came out it had been replaced and was gone forever. (The famous Disney "vault" must have some weird stuff along with all their classics.)

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2 hours ago, Tikisoo said:

Agreed. Nice people did not use those kinds of words, it was a sign of low class upbringing. If a middle class suburban kid cussed, their mouth would be washed out with soap.

I also agree with the OP that movies do not stand the test of time well because of previously unseen "contemporary" issues. When seeing Disney's ALADDIN '92, my friends raved about Robin Williams voicing the Genie and all I could think was: so many of the jokes/quips were political encompassing contemporary issues, how many would still be relevant or funny 20 years later?

Guess Who's Coming To Dinner? '67 is an often cited movie about "modern irrelevance" since younger people don't understand what interracial marriage could mean in 1960's American society. Just yesterday I heard a news story about a kid offended by a teacher not addressing him/her using the correct pronouns-kids today don't understand social pressure to fit in, instead it's all about society accommodating their "special needs".

Then there's the whole, "I'm not the same person at 55 that I was at 15" reaction to a movie. Watching classic movies as a teen, I didn't always "see" the POV the same as the character. Stella Dallas or Lady For A Day are two stories of self-sacrificing Moms that I wholly understand as an older woman, but thought rather stupid in my teens. This is why I often re-watch films to see if I like them better another time.

The movie doesn't change, you do.

 

all the jane fonda topical movies are relegated to the trash bin. china syndrome,,,coming home

as per your "guess who's coming,,,,,"  it's not just change in zeitgeist but also topical movies are locked into the era that seeded them

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BROADCAST NEWS (1987) seems rather dated because now reporters and 'journalists' have no shame about faking tears, faking stories, faking anything else.  Back then I reckon it was still mainly not a proper thing to do . . . but now there's no shortage of fakery from my observations.   I doubt I could watch it again simply because, well, I don't see the point unless I've got a hot nut for '80s "news movies".   Or I could just watch ABSENCE OF MALICE instead; I don't feel it dates as much as "Broadcast News" and still has relevance to today's world.  My 2¢ worth.

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9 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

I was pondering this question to myself after watching STAND BY ME (1986) a while back and then I noticed it was due for another airing on TCM.  I still like the movie -- don't get me wrong -- but there's an awful lot of cuss words in a movie that takes place in the late '50s.  I enjoy the nostalgia angle of the movie, too, but in truth I like it less now than I did 15 years ago just because the more times I watched it the more I felt all the bad words weren't necessary and weren't 'period authentic'.  Having grown up in the 1980s I was used to hearing cuss words all the time . . . but was it really like that in 1959?  → Did '50s kids really talk like they all frequented smoke-filled local pool rooms where the adults were cussing all day?  

So who else among the forum readers have a movie or two they used to like more than they do now and why. 

Love the film Stand By Me- but growing up in Oregon in the 80's, that was pretty par for the course as well as loving The Goonies.  The kids in Stand By Me were all from bad households and considered the 'bad kids'.  The main character wasn't so much, but he was the forgotten child at home, once living in the shadow of his older brother who was the football star and then later in the shadow of his passing.  His parents neglect him and he takes refuge in his friends.  So that might explain the bad language to a certain degree.  I've read the novella a few times and it reinforces a lot of this and explains the abuse the kids face at home and how they're ostracized by their teachers who have given up from them.

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Ach!  Kids cussing in the '50's isn't news.  I don't think kids cuss more now than then.  But it's shown in movies now more than then.  Of course, most kids with at least some smarts were careful of WHERE they cussed, as doing so within my Mother's range of hearing would result in a thorough mouth cleansing with Fels-Naptha(MY Mom's choice, anyway)

But as to movies I used to like more than now, It would be some specific contemporary flicks, as far as when they were made.  Like all those American-International motorcycle gang flicks of the late '60's.  WILD ANGELS,  HELL'S ANGELS ON WHEELS, etc.  It's not that I don't like them any more.  I still do.  But they're more nostalgia about MY past than the times.(if you get my drift). And often good for a laugh or two.

BILLY JACK too, seems more camp now to me than the "revolutionary film making" example I thought back then.  :rolleyes:

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Outside of the Kill Bill films and True Romance, i no longer love Tarantino films as much as i did growing up.  Probably because Tarantino was always considered hip and now i hear some of the dialogue inPulp Fiction and find it laughably bad- like a nerdy kid trying to come across as a gansta.

But still love True Romance.  The only tattoo i have related to a film (the angel tattoo that the main characters get when getting married- with a u2 lyric in the banner she holds).

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9 hours ago, skimpole said:

I liked Das Boot right up until critic Stuart Klawans snarked that its message was that "Nazi sailors were just regular guys."

I guess that's kind of the rub with that film and Stalingrad, which i like better than Das Boot.  It's been over a decade since I've seen Stalingrad but from what i recall it sort of takes the Nazism out of the Nazis they show, and present them as soldiers who are following orders they know will lead to their death and show how they've been abandoned by their leaders and are in a hopeless situation.  For me when i first saw it, it was a different view from what i was used to seeing.  Obviously in this war there was no question or gray area on who the bad guys were, but i still found it very powerful.

Ironically, some of the best war films that i've seen are from the point of view of the 'enemy' such as All Quiet on the Western Front, Come and See, Das Boot and Stalingrad.  (For war films from the American viewpoint i'll still pick The Thin Red Line and Platoon even though Oliver Stone has been falling out of favor for me as time goes on.  Schindler's List is in my personal top 25, but i don't consider it a war film as much as a Holocaust film.)  Sorry, went a bit off topic here...

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15 minutes ago, Shank Asu said:

I guess that's kind of the rub with that film and Stalingrad, which i like better than Das Boot.  It's been over a decade since I've seen Stalingrad but from what i recall it sort of takes the Nazism out of the Nazis they show, and present them as soldiers who are following orders they know will lead to their death and show how they've been abandoned by their leaders and are in a hopeless situation.  

 

That pretty much sums up all soldiers and many "leaders" in times of war.  And as it's been stated that not all Russians in the Soviet union were communists, the same goes for Germans in Germany during the Nazi party reign.  I would imagine that not all soldiers in the German army believed in the Nazi stance about aryan superiority and the hatred of Jews, but did have their own feelings of patriotism for their homeland, as do Americans about America.  And if you've seen any of the Ken Burns documentary of THE HOLOCAUST the other day on PBS you'd discover that Americans were no less anti-semitic  in general than most Germans at the time.

Sepiatone

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On 9/20/2022 at 9:15 AM, Mr. Gorman said:

BROADCAST NEWS (1987) seems rather dated because now reporters and 'journalists' have no shame about faking tears, faking stories, faking anything else.  Back then I reckon it was still mainly not a proper thing to do . . . but now there's no shortage of fakery from my observations.   I doubt I could watch it again simply because, well, I don't see the point unless I've got a hot nut for '80s "news movies".   Or I could just watch ABSENCE OF MALICE instead; I don't feel it dates as much as "Broadcast News" and still has relevance to today's world.  My 2¢ worth.

Watched Broadcast News earlier this year and hated most everything about it.  The new(er) Léa Seydoux film, France, IMO was much better.  Not sure it was in the theaters but it's on the Criterion Channel and worth a watch.

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42 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

That pretty much sums up all soldiers and many "leaders" in times of war.  And as it's been stated that not all Russians in the Soviet union were communists, the same goes for Germans in Germany during the Nazi party reign.  I would imagine that not all soldiers in the German army believed in the Nazi stance about aryan superiority and the hatred of Jews, but did have their own feelings of patriotism for their homeland, as do Americans about America.  And if you've seen any of the Ken Burns documentary of THE HOLOCAUST the other day on PBS you'd discover that Americans were no less anti-semitic  in general than most Germans at the time.

Sepiatone

I didn't know Burns had a doc on the Holocaust.  Will definitely look for that.  

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I used to love Now, Voyager as one of my favorite Bette Davis movies. However, because of some personal things that happened in my life that drastically altered me, I grew less and less fond of Jerry and the romance. As a character, I much prefer Dr. Jacquith to him, because Jerry just doesn't seem like a good man. For a long time I couldn't stomach watching the film at all, but was finally able to watch it this month. It wasn't giving me the same negative reactions it had before, but it was no longer a super romantic film to me. Bette is still phenomenal though, as is Claude Rains. 

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Re: what Nazi soldiers thought:  it's a quick read by Alphons Heck THE BURDEN OF HITLER'S LEGACY.  He was a Hitler youth, as a teen led an army group of boys to resist the oncoming Americans.  Went to Nuremburg to hear the trials, over time regretted what happened and most astonishing did a lecture tour and tv appearances with a survivor of the death camps.  Most shocking while sitting next to the survivor on stage (sorry I forget her name) he was asked would he have shot her back in Germany.  He had the courage to finally answer, to audiences horror If I was told to, yes I would have.  It is a good read, how people reacted to him when he immigrated to Canada, then US and while he  toured with I remember her name was Helen Waterford

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@SEPIATONE:  I just can't help but feel like kids of 1959 didn't have the overall 'toilet mouth' of kids from the '80s on to today.  "F" bombs a-plenty and every other 'cuss word'. 

I reckon kids of 1959 enjoyed the thrill of saying various "forbidden words", but I just can't get my head around the majority of '50s young adults spewing forth as many bad words as kids of when I was growing up.  I was one of those "Latch-Key Kids" of the '80s, btw.  I remember that term being bandied about in the not-too-distant past. 

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9 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

Ironically, some of the best war films that i've seen are from the point of view of the 'enemy' such as All Quiet on the Western Front, Come and See, Das Boot and Stalingrad. 

And in this same vein here Shank Asu, there's...

wlzaxdzp4nwcefq6istr.jpg

(...and which has somehow become one of Peckinpah's forgotten and under-appreciated  films)

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2 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

@SEPIATONE:  I just can't help but feel like kids of 1959 didn't have the overall 'toilet mouth' of kids from the '80s on to today.  "F" bombs a-plenty and every other 'cuss word'. 

I reckon kids of 1959 enjoyed the thrill of saying various "forbidden words", but I just can't get my head around the majority of '50s young adults spewing forth as many bad words as kids of when I was growing up.  I was one of those "Latch-Key Kids" of the '80s, btw.  I remember that term being bandied about in the not-too-distant past. 

Can't speak for the 1950s, but I was in school from 1970 to 1982.  Maybe it was just the kids I hung around with, but "cussing" was not a thing in everyday conversation.  I didn't utter an F-bomb myself until I was 14 or 15, when a football player got mad for me sitting at the "wrong" table in the cafeteria (they had just switched around everyone's lunch schedules due to overcrowding in the cafeteria).  I told him to F himself, and continued eating.  He challenged me to a fight after school, but he never showed.   He's still an !@#$% today, BTW.

Even as an adult, I rarely use salty language.  IMO, if you use it all the time, what are you going to do when you get really mad?  The words lose their effectiveness if overused.  But that's just my 2 cents, and that's about all it's worth.

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

He challenged me to a fight after school, but he never showed.   He's still an !@#$% today, BTW.

I have to ask here, Tex.

So, after 40 years, how would you still know this?

(...wait...he didn't turn out to be that governor of yours down there, did he?!)  ;) 

LOL

 

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10 hours ago, Dargo said:

I have to ask here, Tex.

So, after 40 years, how would you still know this?

(...wait...he didn't turn out to be that governor of yours down there, did he?!)  ;) 

LOL

 

HS class reunions, social media, etc.  Our class keeps in fairly close contact with one another.

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15 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

@SEPIATONE:  I just can't help but feel like kids of 1959 didn't have the overall 'toilet mouth' of kids from the '80s on to today.  "F" bombs a-plenty and every other 'cuss word'. 

I reckon kids of 1959 enjoyed the thrill of saying various "forbidden words", but I just can't get my head around the majority of '50s young adults spewing forth as many bad words as kids of when I was growing up.  I was one of those "Latch-Key Kids" of the '80s, btw.  I remember that term being bandied about in the not-too-distant past. 

Maybe not down in "Jaw-Jah"  but here in the Detroit area  kids spoke freely when out of the range of danger.  Most of us had a  "Do as I say, not as I do"  upbringing.  I grew up hearing all the "standard" cuss words( except the "F-bomb" and,  that nasty "C" word).  Mom was very expressive.  But as she would point out,  she was GROWN UP enough to use that language, and WE WEREN'T.  And one funny thing, that F-word was only something I'd hear teens and other kids use.  Never knew of any grown-ups to use it.  To the point I actually thought it was MY generation that invented it! :D    Until one night, while watching a Red Wings hockey game,  Pete Mahovlich was skating furiously toward the Red Wing zone.  My Dad didn't realize he was probably attempting to re-group, and got excited and upset and loudly said, "Where the f**k does he think HE'S going?"  😲

I was shocked.  Surprised that he even knew the word!  ;)   But Mom, who never could abide anyone using that word, threatened to poison his coffee if he ever DARED to utter that filth in HER house again!  :lol:

Sepiatone

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23 hours ago, mr6666 said:

 

I was thinking it would be a forward documentary on the Holocaust.  So being that the title is The US and the Holocaust, what exactly does this focus on?

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